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Old 02-09-2005, 05:08 PM
retorres70 retorres70 is offline
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Default dog breeding

didn't know where to post this, is if its moved then ok.

anyway my mom has a min. Dachshund and her friend has one that she wants to breed. now this is my first time with this sort of thing.

what is the best way for us to do this? her house? his house? put them in a cage when we leave? any suggestions is helpful thanks.
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Old 02-09-2005, 05:36 PM
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Love4Pits Love4Pits is offline
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First off responsible breeding is extremly expensive. Intensive health testing on both parties should be done unless they are both perfect breeding should not take place. They must also not only have wonderful health records but also have the temporments you want to pass on to other dogs. Do you know each dogs history? Who was their sire and dam? That info also plays a key factor in wether you breed or not. Its not as important as the other two things but it helps. I pay $400 and up during this entire process (this is why I don't breed my dogs often).
Ok so say both dogs are perfect canidates for breeding. The breeding pair should be watched at all times never left alone because a female dog in heat is like a ticking time bomb and there have been instances of females attacking and killing males when in heat. It really doesent matter which house the breeding takes place. The cage depends on size if your talking a large pen then ok but other then that i would'nt advise it. I breed my dogs in the laundry room where theres plenty of room but still inclosed. Ok good deal now their bred now its a question on wether you want to know for sure if your ***** is pregnant or be surprised. If you want to know you can have your dog blood tested or sonogramed (also costs money).

Ok now you know that your dog is definatly pregnant either by tests or her ever growing belly. Now consider again what all you will need for the puppies arrival. A welping bed a doggy first aid kit for birthing puppies towels, heated water bottle, snot sucker, scissers, rubber bands, and the number of the vet. A welping bed has to be a safe feeling place in a penned in area is ideal so it will be a living area for the puppies first 9-12 weeks with you. You must be prepared for still born puppies even possibly green puppies, or puppies with physical birth defects like both eyes on one side of the head or no eyes at all. This has never happened to me but I have heard horror stories. You also should be prepared for issues with the momma dog she is just as at risk of dieing as the young pups and if their is a problem during the birthing process you should rush your dog straight to the vet. You don't want to lose your dog or your pups. i would study up more on problems during the birthing process on your own because I could go on forever.

So the pups are born and growing up healthy and happy if you want again to be a responsible dog breeder I would get each pups first shots and dewormed or whatever else they need before they go to their new homes. Little check ups for them or mom inbetween just to make sure all is ok. Also its always a good idea to have homes for the puppies before their even born so you know for sure that they have great homes.
Like I have said before responsible breeding costs tons of money and you most definatly will not make it back after the puppies are sold so be prepared.

Im not going to put an personal comments because i don't want to get offensive because i like everyone on here. So this is all the infor i have for you and all i can say is if you go through with it good luck .
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Old 02-09-2005, 10:56 PM
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Couldn't have said it better! Miniatures, I'm told, also are at much greater risk for needing emergency C-sections - expensive AND risky.
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Old 02-10-2005, 09:28 AM
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I think LoveForPits has it absolutely right. You also need to be prepared for major behavioral changes in the ***** if she does become pregnant. Sometimes her behavior will do a complete 180 before she even begins to show. I've been called in for normally docile dogs who were "leaking" urine uncontrollably, biting or snarling, hiding away, nesting (long before it was time), etc. and it turned out the poor thing was pregnant! Most dogs don't go completely nuts, but it's something you need to be aware of.

Also, remember that the farther a breed gets from the physical "doggy ideal"--meaning a wolf--the more hereditary health problems that breed is likely to develop. (Think of Bulldogs, Great Danes, and Pugs, and the sort of genetic problems they experience.) Doxies are about as far as you can get physically from a wolf--back problems, blindness, luxating patellas, ear infections, hernias...you name it, they can be born with it! Even with a clean bill of health for the male and the female, it's very hard to predict which recessive genes may manifest in the pups. So you need to be prepared to make the decision that may arise; are you willing to pay for a pup's surgery, should he or she need it? Or would you have to euthanize him? That can be a really difficult choice.

And just as Renee said, with Doxies (especially minis) you have to plan for a cesarian section. Frequently the pups are just too big to move through the birth canal. This, as any surgery, poses health risks to the mother and the pups.

Now that I've gotten all my doomsaying done, if you do decide to go ahead with it, I wish you the best of luck.
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Old 02-10-2005, 10:28 AM
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Yeah, it is kind of ironic, but just a minor glitch.
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Stupid is the most notoriously incurable and contagious disease known to mankind. If you find yourself in close proximity to someone infected with stupid, walk away as soon as said infection is noted.


There are few things more nauseating than pure obedience. ~ Kvothe

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Old 02-11-2005, 11:29 PM
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bubbatd bubbatd is offline
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I agree with all of the above. Both dogs have to have a good health record and back ground. I never bred a dog, male or female, without their mate having hip/heart/eye checks......I did mine. I never had to advertise as I usually had a 2 year waiting list...therefore if my male was used I could help with the sales to make sure they had good homes. I never bred my males unless I was sure the female's family ( if unsure about the whelping ) promised to follow the rules for 7 to 8 weeks of socializing/grooming/loving etc etc etc. It very rewarding (but Expensive and time consuming to do it correctly. I'll quit now as I could vent on and on......I started breeding only because I wanted off spring of my great dogs and so did others. I have heard that doxies do have problems. Good luck, if you do.........
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Old 02-11-2005, 11:32 PM
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P.S. .....if you can't post ***** on a dog forum , can you post ******* ????
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Old 02-11-2005, 11:33 PM
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Guess you can't !
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Old 02-12-2005, 01:00 PM
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I just don't breed my dogs. Everything that comes through my doorstep is spayed or neutered right away. There are so many wonderful dogs in the world that don't have homes... It seems a shame to add fuel to the fire. If it weren't for the damned puppy mills.

But I know there are a lot of responsible breeders out there, too. (Even in Chazhound!) And they are doing a wonderful service to their breeds. I admire them because I think I only vaguely understand the kind of work they put in long before the puppies are even conceived! And I've raised a litter of puppies before who lost their mother--I admire the b*tches too!
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