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  #1  
Old 01-23-2005, 06:51 PM
Bucket Bucket is offline
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Default Have you treated your dog for Yeast infection

I may have posted this question before and I do appreciate the info and I have visited the http://www.greatdanelady.com/article...tter_foods.htm and then linked to the site for Nzymes. Its a great site full of info. But the products reccomend are Soy protein based and my big concern is that the products are Soy Protein based and Soy is an Allergin. So I would prefer to not use something Soy based.

Does anyone know of other products or ever hear of Berte's.

Thanks so much
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  #2  
Old 01-23-2005, 09:36 PM
Saje Saje is offline
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I don't know what Berte's is but yogurt is the greatest thing to help with yeast infections (dogs and people). There is both dairy and soy (it's true) so get the dairy if you're worried.
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Old 01-23-2005, 10:24 PM
Bucket Bucket is offline
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Thanks
I keep her away from dairy as it upsets her tummy. She did Yogurt for a while.
For the last 2 years she gets Prozyme mixed in with her food. Great stuff. But I wonder if a Probiotic added to the regimen would be good. Right now she is eating Canidae. She has had two ear infections which occured about a year ago and they were diagnosed as Yeast related. Since then I noticed she rubs her face and her feet really smell along with a body odor. She also has other minor symptoms that were on the list at the above sites.

Berte's has a line of Probiotic's and vitamins. Wondering if anyone has tried them.
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Old 01-23-2005, 10:37 PM
Saje Saje is offline
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Well, maybe you could by acidophilus (the good bacteria in yogurt) in capsules and break them open on his food. Or get the liquid form. I'm not positive about this but I think it would help a lot.

This website might be helpful http://www.thepetprofessor.com/secAr...ns_in_dogs.asp
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Old 01-23-2005, 10:44 PM
Bucket Bucket is offline
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Saje
That is a wonderful site that I have added to my Fav's. Thanks for sharing.
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  #6  
Old 01-23-2005, 10:47 PM
Saje Saje is offline
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Glad it was helpful.
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  #7  
Old 01-30-2005, 02:23 AM
balidog balidog is offline
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Default yeast infections

Hallo,
for yeast infection you have to change your dogs diet, stop all carbohydrates.
Best is also to stop commercial dog foods. Please see more detailed info here:
Dogs Yeast Infections

Most skin disorders are immune system related, here is a holistic supplement to boost the immune system:

nutritional vitamin supplement
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  #8  
Old 01-30-2005, 02:19 PM
crazydog crazydog is offline
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on the site that saje posted, it said to avoid feeding your dog all grains with rice, wheat, etc) so then why does alot of people on here feed their dogs rice sometimes. or am i being mistaken?
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  #9  
Old 01-30-2005, 03:27 PM
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Renee750il Renee750il is offline
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It's one of those things that vets tell you to feed when a dog is having trouble keeping food down. Personally, that's the very time I would avoid feeding it, as it isn't easily digested by dogs.

When you're battling yeast you need to take a much stricter approach to diet than you normally would, just as you must when you have a dog with food allergies.

I let mine have leftover rice from dinner from time to time as they don't have any digestive problems. Kharma, especially, has that Fila capacity to digest just about anything. Shiva gets gassy if she gets too much of the wrong thing; it's her show-dog lines on her father's side. It's really something you have to watch for with the individual dog.
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  #10  
Old 02-01-2005, 06:10 AM
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sorry to butt in, but this is a topic i feel strongly about and have a few thoughts to share.

first of all, while some of the information on the great dane lady's website is very useful, i don't agree with all the products she endorses. but she makes a profit from referrals, so i understand why she does it.

* nzymes for example are in my opinion a useless supplement. if you look at the ingredient list, you see things like "proprietary blend of Sprouted Soy Protein and RiceX ricebran", liver and beef flavoring, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium. none of these things are going to address the yeast problem itself. it's a general nutritional supplement with perocessed ingredients that may or may not contribute something useful to a dog's diet. it would be far more beneficial to feed some fresh liver and muscle meat (cooked if you absolutely must, but raw is better), pureed fresh veggies and a good, human grade vitamin C and vitamin E supplement - at a fraction of the price.
* the "bac pac" probiotic supplement is full of unnecessary ingredients, flavoring agents, stabilizers and so on and has a fairly low amount of colony forming units (cfu) - only 3.1 billion per gram, where other, better quality products have 2-4 times as many. that means you have to feed only 1/2 to 1/4 of the amount required for a truly therapeutic effect.

i generally do not recommend buying pet grade supplements, since they do not fall under the same strict regulation as human grade ones, are usually diluted by flavoring agents and are mostly quite overpriced.

on to the yogurt. it's a beneficial addition to the food, but even the best cultured yogurt does not offer enough bacteria for a therapeutic effect. it's okay for the maintenance of an animal that has no health issues but will not make enough of a difference in a problematic case.

if a dog has recurring yeast issues, there's a problem witht he diet. i'm not saying that it has to be a full blown allergy, but something in the food does not agree with the body and it is weakened enough not to have enough immune power to deal with the irritant and the yeast overgrowing.

it is a myth that "carbs feed yeast". you can eliminate all grains from a dog's diet, but it will still contain carbs, as long as you don't also eliminate any fruit or vegetables as well. the words "carbs" and "starch" can not be used interchangeably. furthermore, a number of processes in the body have an absolute need for glucose (a simple sugar), the brain first and foremost. the body will fuel this need, if necessary, by converting protein and/or fat to glucose. so even if you eliminate all starch from the diet otherwise, you can not eliminate sugar from the body. i see balidog's only purpose was to push a product on a website he or she is affiliated with tho. lol

another myth is that candida albicans widely affects dogs. systemic yeast infection in dogs is so rare that it makes reports in medical journals. the type of yeast most dogs are affected by is malassezia, and overgrowth causing dermatitis, otitis and other problems is triggered by an underlying cause, often a dietary problem.
http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/Diseases/de...dermatitis.htm
http://www.dog.com/vet/dermatology/05.html

before jumping into any kind of treatment, have a vet perform a test and determine what you are dealing with. treatment generally involves some sort of antifungal, but as long as the underlying cause is not eliminated, the yeast overgrowth is going to keep coming back.

rice is generally not a problem and overall a very digestible carb source, but it must be almost cooked to death before cellulose is broken down sufficiently for the dog to digest the rice. it's different in commercial pet food since it is ground and cooked sufficiently in the manufacturing process. it's pretty pointless to add it to a commercial diet tho, since they include a lot of grains already to begin with. for a home prepared diet, brown rice is more nutritious than white rice.

ok, all that out of the way, i checked out the article linked at thepetprofessor.com and i must say i'm pretty disappointed. that darleen rudnick person who wrote the article seems pretty clueless to me and much of the information on that site is totally incorrect. sadly it sseems that she does consultations and is spreading a lot of that misinformation to even more people.

i'll address the incorrect information as it appears in the article:

Quote:
One family of yeasts called, Candida albicans, live in your pet's body, and consume substances such as sugar and fats in order to survive.
contrary to common belief, systemic infection with candida albicans is not a common occurrence in dogs. as i mentioned further up, they mostly experience problems from malassezia, which overgrows due to underlying problems. once these are eliminated, the yeast returns to normal levels even present on healthy animals.

Quote:
When a pet's immune system is healthy, the body is able to destroy the yeast. However, when the immune system is weak, the yeast may produce in mass amounts causing toxins that disable the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. In this case, the immune system cannot destroy the yeast. At this point, the system becomes altered causing a host of health problems.
again, the yeast is [b]not the primary issue, it is a sumptom that surfaces because the body is not strong enough to deal with the underlying cause and the yeast overgrowth at the same time.

Quote:
Many pet owners have visited several veterinarians, and have spent hundreds of dollars without any positive results. In a large percentage of cases, a vet has ruled out a yeast infection. However, when the owner began treatment for a yeast infection, the pet responded positively.
yes, the pet may respond positively to the yeast being treated, but yet again - it's just a symptom that is addressed, not the underlying problem that causes it.

Quote:
Many different types of traditional treatments are being used to treat yeast and other skin problems. Although drugs are very effective, in most cases they do not eliminate the cause of the symptom. To get at the cause, you need to look at the whole picture. Once the cause is found, a PREVENTION PLAN can be initiated.
the only prevention that is needed is eliminating the particular food ingredients that cause problems.

Quote:
1. Change the Diet -- You Must Feed an Anti-Yeast Diet

An anti-yeast diet is one that includes meats, most vegetables and some diary. An anti-yeast diet will starve the yeast and aid in the healing process. However, diet alone will not control the problem, it is only the first step. Keep in mind a restricted diet does not have to last forever. Once your pet's health improves, you will be able to expand on what you feed.
[list of foods that are "ok" or "not ok" - i'll leave that out for sake of brevity as some of the foods listed are quite ridiculous and have nothing to do with yeast issues.]
you do not need to prepare a horribly complicated diet to get rid of the problem. and you definitely do not need to spend hundreds of dollars for various supplements to treat your dog over the course of up to a year or longer. it's all a lot of hype, especially the notion that you can get to the bottom of this by feeding a particular brand of commercial kibble (azmira is mentioned specifically).

i also question the fact that she advises to cook her recipes for homecooked pet food for 6 hours. prolonged exposure to heat destroys many nutrients and it is absolutely not necessary. even a whole chicken with meat on the bone can be simmered tender at quite low temperatures in under two hours.

Quote:
Cooking, or feeding raw is not convenient for everyone, and you should not feel guilty or feel that you will never get the problem under control. You can still feed a high quality dry or canned food. However, it will take a little longer to get the yeast problem under control.
no, you will not get a yeast problem under control permanently by feeding commercial foods. even the most simple formulations contain a good number of vitamin and mineral supplements as well as other ingredients that can contribute to the underlying cause. this is nothingbut scamming people into a prolonged, very costly treatment and will not rid your poor dog of problems as soon as possible.

Quote:
Supplementing is a Must When Treating Skin Disorders
wrong again. i'll get into more detail on that very soon.

Quote:
[a long list of products that are mostly combinations of different ingredients
and yet again, only addressing topical issues, but not the real problem at hand.


ok, now it tells me my post is too long, so i'll have to break it up.
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