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Old 02-08-2006, 01:08 PM
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gapeach gapeach is offline
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Default The Unthinkable has happened...

Carey bit Maggie (our daughter) on the face yesterday. First of all Maggie is ok, she has a scrape over her eyelid and two on her cheek with some bruising. Next, those of you who don't know me, Carey is a fantastic dog. Yes she has food aggression and it was my fault. We bought Carey a treat ball for Christmas, she had been locked up earlier in the day (two baby gates in the kitchen, lots of space) because she has seperation anxiety and will tear things up. We had come back from my mom's (Carey too) and I had forgotten to pick up the treat ball from earlier that day, Carey picked it up and before I get get to them Maggie tried to take it, Carey dropped the ball and bit Maggie on the face. We struggled with the decision of putting her to sleep and have decided not to, she is a beloved part of our family. And a loving, protective dog. But we must make certain this never happens again. Carey has always been very dominant, at times trying me, by not letting go of a toy or such. When Maggie gets to rough, she does a low grunt or growl. She has nipped at Maggie before as a warning, but in no way did I ever think she would bite her like she has. My problem is, we have to find a way to show Carey that even though Maggie is smaller, she is dominant over Carey. Those of you who know, please advise us on how to do this. I must also say that we have always taught Maggie to be gentle with animals, but she is very high spirited and like any two year old doesn't listen sometimes. She is punished and sits in time out but still has lots of learning to do in this area. Please Help!
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Old 02-08-2006, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
She has nipped at Maggie before as a warning, but in no way did I ever think she would bite her like she has.
Why not? Once a dog warns or bites and finds out it works, she's more likely to bite again, and you may not get so lucky next time. (I'm so glad your daughter was not severely wounded or killed)

I strongly advise you to find a certified and reputable behaviorist who uses fair and unharsh methods to modify this dog's behavior as well as your own. There is clearly a leadership problem here, where your dog does not know it's place in your family. Once it gets to the point where your dog is biting, you need professional help. It is not safe for you to rely on help from the Internet.

I doubt that it is necessary to put the dog down, but you might consider finding a home with someone who is really in the know about how to handle this situation. I know you love your dog, but if you don't get help and this escalates, you may have to resort to putting her down and that is not in the dog's best interest as long as there is a possibility of re-habilitating her and turning this around. It has a very good chance of escalating to a more severe bite next time. Please be careful.
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Old 02-08-2006, 02:01 PM
Gempress Gempress is offline
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I agree with doberluv about finding a good behaviorist immediately. I think that the problem is fixable, with time and patience. In the meantime, really start using NILF and spending more time on obedience training.

But I do not agree with rehoming Carey. It is not a good idea to rehome a dog with any type of aggression problem. You can be held liable if the new owners are bitten/injured. As sad as this may sound, you should have Carey euthanized if the training does not work.

I feel so bad for you. I've been in that situation. I really hope you find a good trainer, because I think that Carey can get over this.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:13 PM
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Julie Julie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gapeach
Carey bit Maggie (our daughter) on the face yesterday. First of all Maggie is ok, she has a scrape over her eyelid and two on her cheek with some bruising. Next, those of you who don't know me, Carey is a fantastic dog. Yes she has food aggression and it was my fault. We bought Carey a treat ball for Christmas, she had been locked up earlier in the day (two baby gates in the kitchen, lots of space) because she has seperation anxiety and will tear things up. We had come back from my mom's (Carey too) and I had forgotten to pick up the treat ball from earlier that day, Carey picked it up and before I get get to them Maggie tried to take it, Carey dropped the ball and bit Maggie on the face. We struggled with the decision of putting her to sleep and have decided not to, she is a beloved part of our family. And a loving, protective dog. But we must make certain this never happens again. Carey has always been very dominant, at times trying me, by not letting go of a toy or such. When Maggie gets to rough, she does a low grunt or growl. She has nipped at Maggie before as a warning, but in no way did I ever think she would bite her like she has. My problem is, we have to find a way to show Carey that even though Maggie is smaller, she is dominant over Carey. Those of you who know, please advise us on how to do this. I must also say that we have always taught Maggie to be gentle with animals, but she is very high spirited and like any two year old doesn't listen sometimes. She is punished and sits in time out but still has lots of learning to do in this area. Please Help!
I guess I am just overly cautious with my children, but even if one of my dogs growled at my children I would not tolerate it. To me you got off lucky with this bite, but what if it happens again, but the next time leaves permanent scars? or worse......I love my dogs and I know you love Carey but our children have to be our first priority.....regardless.
And I see you are expecting....congrats.......but that will be yet another child to be cautious of.
I wish you the best, but I would have to say for me, rehoming would be my decision. Into a home without children. With someone very familar with dog behaviour. That would be hard to find.....but maybe some rescue organizations could help find one, if you change your mind of course.

Otherwise, just be very careful. Good Luck,
Julie.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:25 PM
RedyreRottweilers
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Keep in mind that dogs bite in the face with INTENT TO HARM.

You need help and you need it now.

Meantime, ZERO access of dog to kid.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:32 PM
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What a terrible situation you are in. I'm so sorry. However, I think you must be realistic. Two young children will be even more overwhelming for your dog and it's impossible to watch them all the time.

I have a very good friend who has two boys. She had an airedale terrier who had never shown any aggression. But one day, one of the children was crawling and cornered the dog. The dog lashed out and severely injured the boy's face. He needed more than 50 stitches and even now, at 24 years of age, he still has a scar. My friend loved that dog. They decided to give him to her parents, the grandparents of the children. That way, the dog was away from the children in a childless home, and when they went to visit Grandma, the dog was locked in a kennel outside. My friend could still see her dog whenever she wanted. It worked out ok.

Just my opinion, but I think it would be a mistake to keep Baxter around your baby. It's such a sad situation. I wish you good luck with your decision.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:32 PM
brock23
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I have a nice bruise on my leg from getting in between Otto and my parents beagle this weekend over a food dispute. I socialized him with some little kids on Sunday and he did great, but I have the bite mark to prove that he still has some demons. I would not let him around kids right now without me being there standing directly over him though.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:48 PM
corsomom corsomom is offline
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I am sure you love your dog and feel bad for you but I think this is a disaster waiting to happen.personaly I would never keep a dog that bit my child in the face.Good luck to you with what you chose to do. Again I feel for you knowing that you love your dog.
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Old 02-08-2006, 03:54 PM
scob89 scob89 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gempress
I agree with doberluv about finding a good behaviorist immediately. I think that the problem is fixable, with time and patience. In the meantime, really start using NILF and spending more time on obedience training.

But I do not agree with rehoming Carey. It is not a good idea to rehome a dog with any type of aggression problem. You can be held liable if the new owners are bitten/injured. As sad as this may sound, you should have Carey euthanized if the training does not work.

I feel so bad for you. I've been in that situation. I really hope you find a good trainer, because I think that Carey can get over this.
I agree there. Find a trainer to work with Carey and not let him around your kid any more until the problem is fixed.
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  #10  
Old 02-08-2006, 03:59 PM
tainted_870 tainted_870 is offline
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Everyone's going to disagree with what I say here, and I'm probably even going to get yelled at.

I don***8217;t know much about dogs, but I know the basics. I too have a Ridgeback (and by the photos, I***8217;m guessing that's what your dog is) and she has never gone for me, or anyone in my family.

I am nice to my dog, don***8217;t get me wrong. But I don't take any sh*t from her either. The very first time my dog ever attempted to be aggressive towards me (to get her own way), I came down on her like a ton of bricks. She has never tried anything since, and she knows that our family (or me at least) are the dominant people in the 'pack'.

I agree in praising dogs and all when they are doing the right things, but it comes to some extent when you've got to show them that your not a complete pansy, otherwise they will walk all over you (and end up biting you, like yours did).
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