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Old 03-05-2004, 04:28 AM
bertbrownbear bertbrownbear is offline
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Unhappy Help My dogs pee!

Can anyone offer some advice on my dogs peeing?

They are perfectly house trained when it come to going out, its when they come back in.

Sometimes if its wet or muddy and they have dirty paws and I want to give them a quick wipe with a towel they start looking nervous and just squat and pee! (They are both female) its becoming a bit of a nightmare.


Just this morning I let one out and when she came back in I dried her feet with a towel and she was ok, but when I turned round the other one had just peed all over the floor! we now seem to be in a vicious circle where they get nervous and start to pee, I get "don't pee, don't pee" they get more nervous well it ends in pee

Help most welcome

I have never type pee so much
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  #2  
Old 03-05-2004, 07:43 AM
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Renee750il Renee750il is offline
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It sounds like you've got a couple of girls with very submissive natures. Try crouching down with the towel and using it as a toy, letting them smell it and tug on it a bit. Play with them with the towel while you're drying their feet off, talk baby talk to them, pet them and generally make it a fun, play experience. Remember, to a dog, giving a paw to another is a gesture of abject submission, so you've got to remove that aspect of the operation. Make sure you're squatted down to their level while you're doing it, and instead of being really thorough on each foot, take little swipes at each foot, going back and forth several times from one foot to the other and from one dog to the other. It will take some time to clean their feet this way, but eventually they'll get better with it and it will go more quickly. Besides, it's not as time consuming as cleaning up all that pee!

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
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Old 03-07-2004, 05:01 PM
Brattina88 Brattina88 is offline
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I know quite a few people who've taught their dogs to wipe there own feet by teaching them to walk in a couple quick circles or dig on command a rug, of course. Its less work for people, but you can never be %100 they got all of the mud off. Just a suggestion
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Old 03-18-2004, 06:25 AM
bertbrownbear bertbrownbear is offline
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Thanks for everyones help, I have kinda given up on cleaning their feet when they come in. I just give them lots of fuss and attention and hoover the carpet when the mud dries!

Bert Brown Bear
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Old 03-18-2004, 08:35 AM
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Renee750il Renee750il is offline
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A large cocoa fiber mat outside the door might help cut down on the vaccuuming. Get the biggest one you can find so they can both stand on it before you let them in. The fibers are fuzzy, but stiff enough to actually do some good, but they're soft enough not to hurt your dogs' feet or make them try to avoid standing on it.

My Bimmer has a kiddie pool in the yard that he gets into and washes off before he comes in if he's been out in the mud. I didn't teach him that, he just does it. Shiva, on the other hand, has to spend some time in the laundry room to de-slob herself before she comes in. She can carry a ton of mud on those huge webbed feet of hers!
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