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  #11  
Old 11-14-2012, 12:02 AM
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I'll definitely suggest that to him to try.
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  #12  
Old 11-14-2012, 12:20 AM
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A singleton could end up being extra large, and not whelping easily. Otherwise, there's no reason why a singleton should have any more trouble with survival than any other puppy.

I have heard of them having behavioral issues. My Tess was raised as a singleton (there were 5 other pups, but only Tess survived past 36 hours), and she is fine, no problems. Not a lot of impulse control, but she's a Stafford, they aren't a breed that is good at impulse control anyway. She's a little uncomfortable with other dogs, but still mostly appropriate. She tends to just not know how to handle dogs that are behaving inappropriately towards her.

I did do some extra stuff with her that I might not have otherwise done, ie; when she got old enough to motor around by herself, I'd roll her over on her back and hold her gently with one hand, to get her used to being frustrated. I don't know if the breeders of this dog would be willing to do that kind of stuff. If not, other pups to mingle with would be a really good idea.

The one other thing I'd say is that I think there may be some breed differences in how dogs deal with being a singleton. My Tess is not the only singleton Stafford I've known, and all of them were fine. I heard once from someone who bred Deerhounds, though, that it caused a lot of problems. I suspect that in breeds that are intended more as pack dogs, it might be more of an issue.
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:32 AM
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Hmmm, that's definitely something to consider.

If he DOES end up taking this pup, do you think doggie daycare would be a good idea once it's older? I'm not sure what length the breeder is willing to go to to work with him on this, I'll find out if possible, but I have access to a really great daycare (I used to work there) to utilize once pup reaches four months old (minimum age for this place to attend) but four months is such an old age to start learning about interaction I'd think.

And too, I guess it all depends on this pups natural temperament as well. If it's a really pushy pup to begin with, four months might be too little too late.

I don't know. I think if it was me, I'd probably pass on this puppy. Which is probably what I'll tell him, but he's just as hardheaded as I am, so he'll end up doing whatever he thinks is best, but I'm just not sure.
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Old 11-14-2012, 02:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyinsbt View Post
The one other thing I'd say is that I think there may be some breed differences in how dogs deal with being a singleton. My Tess is not the only singleton Stafford I've known, and all of them were fine. I heard once from someone who bred Deerhounds, though, that it caused a lot of problems. I suspect that in breeds that are intended more as pack dogs, it might be more of an issue.
It's interesting that the one fine singeton I knew was also a staffy.

Sighthounds physically don't develop right if they're singletons. Even past 8-9 weeks. They don't exercise properly without another similarly sized dog to romp with and even the best bred dogs can end up roachy, easty westy, and slab sided. It's really common for people to take a loaner grow out companion puppy/sibling until their pup catches up to any older dogs it's going to live with.
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Old 11-14-2012, 06:32 AM
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Rose was a singleton. She is the antithesis of pushy dog. Genetics is going to be more important than how many pups were in a litter.

Singletons happen a LOT in toy breeds. Small litter size to start with and all that. So it's completely normal to me and wouldn't phase me one bit.
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:20 AM
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The only two singletons I know or have known personally were Flatcoats (there are probably others, but I didn't know they were singletons). Both were raised as singletons but with extra early exposure to appropriate other dogs and a lot of attention as pups. Both grew up to be confident, mannerly, affectionate dogs who were safe with people and canines. One is the dog with whom we intend to breed Mira -- when I met him the guy just had a charming and rock-solid temperament, and those who knew him when he was younger say the same...he was a fan favorite.

But these are Flatcoats, and ones of excellent breeding at that. The genetics were already lined up for enthusiastic, level-headed, socially oriented dogs. Being a singleton did not prevent that from developing.
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  #17  
Old 11-14-2012, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
Singletons happen a LOT in toy breeds. Small litter size to start with and all that. So it's completely normal to me and wouldn't phase me one bit.
I do think it's interesting that medium/big dog breed folks worry so much over singleton litters while toy breed folk are used to it and don't even raise an eyebrow.
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  #18  
Old 11-14-2012, 07:41 AM
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Auggie's brother is a singleton. LOL it sounds weird to say that, but they did the breeding once and it only produced Quigley, so they repeated the breeding and that resulted in Auggie's litter which was four puppies.
I am pretty much obsessed with Quigley as a dog, love him to pieces, he is amazing. As far as temperament goes he often reminds me of Payton who was also in a litter of four.

It does seem slightly odd to me that they want to keep the puppy if it's a multiple but won't keep it if it's a singleton, but that's the only thing that seems bizarre. Otherwise nope, I wouldn't worry about it.
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  #19  
Old 11-14-2012, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shai View Post
I do think it's interesting that medium/big dog breed folks worry so much over singleton litters while toy breed folk are used to it and don't even raise an eyebrow.
From a reproductive health standpoint, singletons and small litters from natural breedings are a bit concerning, especially if it happens repeatedly. Except in toys, where it is considered normal. From a behavior standpoint, I do think people tend to worry a bit too much about it.

I would not take the puppy to daycare or over expose the puppy to wild, free for all group play in an attempt to make up for not having littermates. Especially considering the dog is an APBT mix. I think exposure to and play with friend's dogs is good or one on one play with another well matched puppy. And socialize as normal.

I have known breeders who wouldn't keep singletons because they like to be able to compare puppies to littermates in their choosing. I think that is a bit strange but I've come across that thinking more than once.
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  #20  
Old 11-14-2012, 08:08 AM
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I knew one singleton puppy...parent's friends had their beagle artificially inseminated and turned out one pup.

She was a bit wild, but had no aggression issues, bite inhibition issues, was great with kids and other dogs. But:

a) this was a beagle, not really prone to DA
b) she lived her whole life with her mother
c) she was a little "off" (my mom said mentally retarded) but not in a bad way at all. They thought it was because she needed to have CPR done at birth to get her breathing...looking back I think it's because she was much higher energy than their other dog and they just didn't get that.
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