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  #1  
Old 01-02-2006, 05:37 AM
lucille lucille is offline
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Default GSD puppy is jumping up

How should I get him to not do that, lately when I take him outside he will jump up on me. I know when he is older I can have him sit/stay but I would like to begin work on this issue now since he is getting bigger. Any suggestions please?
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Old 01-02-2006, 08:47 AM
Hyper-Lab Hyper-Lab is offline
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What i was taught in k9 training and behaviour about dogs jumping up when people got home or visiters turned up or any type of jumping up onto a human was:

(I'll use an example of say you arriving home)

When you walk inside and he jumps up on you, turn around and face the other direction so that he no longer has his front paws on you, then turn around and completly ignore him, this means no looking at him, no touching him and no talking to him, if dogs jump up on you and you push them off, they have gotten what they wanted, attention>pat, do the above untill eventally the behaviour will cease, but everyone that he jumps up on, no matter where you or they are, you must do the above and be consistant with it.

You can pat him when he has calmed down and when the bad behaviour has stopped.
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Old 01-02-2006, 09:36 AM
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DanL DanL is offline
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You could keep his leash on him, and stand on the leash so he can't jump up.
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  #4  
Old 01-02-2006, 09:52 AM
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Debi Debi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyper-Lab
What i was taught in k9 training and behaviour about dogs jumping up when people got home or visiters turned up or any type of jumping up onto a human was:

(I'll use an example of say you arriving home)

When you walk inside and he jumps up on you, turn around and face the other direction so that he no longer has his front paws on you, then turn around and completly ignore him, this means no looking at him, no touching him and no talking to him, if dogs jump up on you and you push them off, they have gotten what they wanted, attention>pat, do the above untill eventally the behaviour will cease, but everyone that he jumps up on, no matter where you or they are, you must do the above and be consistant with it.

You can pat him when he has calmed down and when the bad behaviour has stopped.

unless you have a dog that doesn't have a problem with jumping on your back! work on the 'DOWN, SIT' commands endlessly. when I'm walking my GSD, just once in awhile...he'll turn around and want to jump up on me. this was so strange the first time it happened, because it is not his usual behavior. in my case, I found that when he does that he is trying to tell me he is uncomfortable with something. sounds silly I know, but everyone knows their dog....for us, it has been when we are walking in the woods. I think he senses something (animal?) and wants to go another direction. when we turn, he is fine. NOW, when my hubby tries to walk him...he ALWAYS turns to jump, and I can tell you that is entirely because my hubby does the walking so seldom that Hammie has no respect....it's all a big game. I would swear that Hammie is even laughing. could just be bouncey puppy energy...which will diminish with maturity and training.
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  #5  
Old 01-02-2006, 10:59 AM
RedyreRottweilers
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You must change the power relationship to prevent or stop jumping up. When the puppy is jumping up, he is usually advancing and controlling the moment.

You must turn the tables.

Walk directly INTO the dog, picking your knees up high and stamping your feet. At the same time, smile and say GET BACK. Have a treat ready, and as the dog begins to move away from you and stop jumping, put the treat on the nose and ask for a sit. Reward. Repeat as necessary.
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  #6  
Old 01-02-2006, 05:46 PM
Hyper-Lab Hyper-Lab is offline
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Well, back front or sideways (what ever way the dog jumps) shouldnt affect the outcome of the procedure, turning is still knocking (if you will) the pup and or dog off your body, what ever part of your body that the dog has jumped up on doesnt affect the ignoring rule of it and it does work, my 12 year old dog had a bad habbit of jumping up on people (their front and side) and with the quick turn + no touching/talking/looking at him soon made him realize that the behaviour would not get him the attention he wanted (the touching (the push off) and talking to him when he jumped). A friend also did this with his Poddle pup which had the worst jumping up habbit that i have ever seen, this pup did it every chance it got and did it to everyone (kids included) the whole family and everyone that came over was told by them what to do when the Poddle jumped, also the pup learned pretty quickly that that type of behaviour would not get him what he wanted.

The turning is strictly there to get the dog off you without you touching it, remember that touch/talking/looking are forms of attention and when most dogs jump up on humans it is for attention...

I have a similar problem with both of my dogs and my partner, my dogs class the family pack as Mum (me) chevy (12 year old dog), Danni (3 year old Lab) and then Brett (my partner), as soon as he takes the leash for any of my dogs they make a mokery of him, Danni which is highly trained will pull Brett on the lead quite abit, constantly move out of heel posistion, sniff the ground, pull slightly to get to a fence or tree or anything else that gets his attention, if my partner tries a correction Danni will listen, but wont do the correction properly, however the instant i take the leash (or call him to heel) he knows that Mum has got him and his behaviour is perfect, if he needs a correction (which is rare) then his corrections are done flawlessly. Chevy (the 12 year old dog) will also act up alot when Brett is walking him, but as soon as i do a verbal correction he does it right away, if i leave Brett to do the correction Chevy will out right refuse to do it and Brett needs to give Chevy guidance if you will for the correction, Both dogs submitt to me, but poor old Brett is struggling to get to the top of the pack.

It makes me walking my 2 dogs hard, Danni is trained to heel on the left, whereas Chevy was always walked on my right (for 12 years) its impossible for me to step off with both feet at the same time
So lucky for me i have to train a human on how to blimmin be more dominant :P

Last edited by Hyper-Lab; 01-02-2006 at 06:00 PM.
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  #7  
Old 01-02-2006, 08:16 PM
yuckaduck
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I followed Manchesters advice with my jumpers and it stopped right away and my dogs are great with everyone now.

When they jump hold the front paws up and tap the back paws. Do nto stomp the back paws....tap. The point is to make them uncomfortable not break there feet. Worked great here, but I knwo when she suggested it there was alot of controversiary so I expect people to disagree. That's ok it worked for me and I will use it in future.
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Old 01-04-2006, 06:48 PM
MyShepherd MyShepherd is offline
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Many aren't going to like this but: A K-9 cop once suggested to me to punch my GSD in the chest every time he jumped. Hasn't worked for me since my dog's chest is so round. But might work for a younger/fatter dog. Stricking a dog is not something I'd normally suggest or do. However, a K-9 cop must know something about what he suggests.
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  #9  
Old 01-04-2006, 07:41 PM
lucille lucille is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyShepherd
Many aren't going to like this but: A K-9 cop once suggested to me to punch my GSD in the chest every time he jumped. Hasn't worked for me since my dog's chest is so round. But might work for a younger/fatter dog. Stricking a dog is not something I'd normally suggest or do. However, a K-9 cop must know something about what he suggests.

I don't think so.
It is not good reasoning to say that because he suggests it, even if he is a member of the canine police, that it is a good policy.
I just don't think hitting a dog is a good idea. I do not think the dog will associate it with jumping up, I think he will fear the hitter and perhaps not jump for that reason. But I want my dog to respect me, and to know I am the alpha, but not that kind of fear of being hit.

I can and will push him off if he is hurting me when he jumps up but I like the idea of using positive rewards. It did not work at all today since he was so excited to see me, but I finally got him settled down and used some bits of chicken and every time he sat I said sit and gave him chicken, he is a looong way from knowing what it means. But that is OK, if I start now when he is little by the time he is big enough to be really obnoxious if he jumps up, he will know what sit/stay means.
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  #10  
Old 01-04-2006, 08:03 PM
Saje Saje is offline
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I don't think punching your dog or kneeing him in the chest is the answer. What I did for Nanook was turned my back and walked away for a short period (2 seconds sometimes) I'd turn around and say sit. If she'd sit I'd get down to her level and love her but in a calm way. Getting down to their level is key because what they really want is to be close to your face. They want that direct attention. By making them sit you are asserting control and by praising them you are reinforcing the command. After Nanook started to clue in that sit=love and jumping=walking away she learned quickly and I would put her in a sit and make her hold it before I'd walk calmly over, get down to her level and love her. Now if I'm ignoring her and she wants attention I just give her a look and she sits. It's quite cute. They are so clever.
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