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Old 09-14-2012, 09:49 PM
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skittledoo skittledoo is offline
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Default Leash time is NOT play time!

Ahhh Joey... you crazy pup you...

Ok... I knew what I was getting into with getting an Ibizan Hound. They are STUBBORN! I knew I was going to be dealing with a stubborn dog, especially considering he's a young male.

I need to teach him that leash time is not play time. When you're walking him he loves to grab the leash to try and play tug. He'll grab stuff along the way (sticks, fallen branches, rocks, etc) to play with and hit me with while we're walking. He walks on leash (which I'm praising him a ton for when he isn't trying to be a tard) but all of a sudden he'll start bouncing around me and it's everything I can do to get him to get his focus off play and back on walking.

The above is when I'm walking him alone. Now add in Cricket. I've mostly been walking them alone so I can get a better feel for him and get an idea what kind of stuff we need to work on. This morning I had to walk him with Cricket because I was kind of rushing to get to work on time. The entire walk he kept trying to play with Cricket and grab at her leash. He's a big goofball and I know he's just trying to have fun, but OMG it made for a terrible walk. I was constantly trying to get his focus back on walking, but let's face it, walking on the leash just isn't quite as fun as pouncing on the dog next to you.

He knows sit, lie down, stay, wait, leave it etc.... but will only do it when he wants to and not necessarily always when you want him to... unless of course you have a BIG reward for him and even then it still seems to be when he feels like it. So he's definitely going to take some work and I'm not sure how much structure and training he had in his previous homes.

I introduced the clicker to him the other day. I'm not sure if anyone has ever used a clicker with him and he seemed interested in it, but he was more interested in trying to take the clicker out of my hand then that shredded chicken I was trying to give him. oh boy...

On the subject of teaching him not to be a nutter butter when he is on leash... what are some tips, tricks and ideas you think I should try with him? I'm trying him out with different types of food rewards to see what he likes, doesn't like much, etc. He seems to be pretty darn toy motivated, but I don't want to amp him up too much with a toy especially when I'm trying to teach him that when he is on leash and we are walking that it's not play time.

He is getting lots of play time in (at work, dog park and home) and he does seem to have a pretty good off switch as well and it content to chill out and gnaw a bone. I've been working on some mental exercises with him mainly doing some basic sits, downs, stays, leave it, drop it as well as trying to teach him how to play some games (find the hidden toy is a fav).

But he has to learn to walk on a leash properly without bouncing around like he has ants in his pants because it's just pure annoying when he pounces on Cricket in play onleash or grabs his leash suddenly and starts play growling and tugging.
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Old 09-14-2012, 10:43 PM
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Ugh - we went through the same thing just this past spring. Kat walked fine for a little while then right outta the blue...mouthing, lunging, bodyslamming, and going berserk.

I'd suggest redirecting to a toy/chewie if you can - if the toy doesn't work try jogging/picking up the pace to get his mind focused back onto the walk rather than spazzing out. Make the walk as interesting as possible - lots of change of paces, sits and stays at different junctures, practice things etc; it's fun for everyone and a much more productive activity than the alternative to say the least

Try this while walking with just him first and see how it goes. Best of luck and keep updating!
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:23 PM
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You do have access to large enclosed areas right? I would start trying to teach him to walk nicely with you off leash and see if you can transition the leash in there. For a quick fix, would dousing the leash with bitter apple help?
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:43 PM
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I guess what I would try first is finding an awesome food reward that he likes, and then getting a chain leash temporarily (usually found at the dollar store). As soon as he becomes bouncy, give a correction such as freezing in place and ignoring him, or shortening up on the leash and requiring a sit. Either way, wait for 5 seconds of calm, and calmly continue the walk, clicking and treating after only a step or two of good walking. And then again after a few more steps, and then again and again and again.

That's what I would try, based on the information given you could also bring a small toy along to reward him after some good walking with a little bit of the play that he's looking for-- a redirection of sorts.
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Old 09-15-2012, 08:56 AM
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When he starts going for the leash you can take his collar and drop the leash making it no fun, take collar right under his chin so he can't mouth you instead. As soon as he's calm start walking again. A harness might make this easier, he will have a harder time getting the leash if it's on his back and you can reach down and hold the back of his harness instead of his collar which will be less confrontational. BUT for trying to play with Cricket a no pull harness might be better, it's much easier to keep a dog away from the other dog if you are pulling back on their chest, turning them away from the other dog. When Tucker tries to play with Phoebe I just stop, hold him as far away as I can and wait until he stops struggling to get her. But it's probably easier given his size, but the harness prevents him from making any progress.

If he's not too quick you can also try moving the leash with him...so he grabs it and you go along with his mouth, preventing the leash from ever getting tight, so he never gets the reward of tugging. I did this with a shelter dog once and it worked great because he just held on and pulled hard, not frantic like, but it didn't work with Tucker because of his small size and because he was having zoomies and leaping into the air to grab as high as he could. If I moved my hand toward him he'd just grab so he was a cm below my hand, or he'd just get my hand.


You could also try making something like running a reward for walking nicely. So walk a few steps, run a few paces, walk a little, run a little, etc. If at any point he grabs the leash freeze and wait. Because running is what he wants, you being still is punishing. This might be something you practice at home first so he learns it before you use it on walks. Keep the running VERY short each time, maybe three paces, at first because that's when he'll have trouble resisting the leash.

Might I also suggest playing with him and then allowing a cool down period before the walk. I find with Tucker walks just rev him up a lot, they don't actually tire him at all. I walk and then play with him because he is a hellion after his walks (cat chasing mostly), but if he were causing issues on the walk I'd play then walk.
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Old 09-15-2012, 10:02 AM
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My thought is don't fight it! Engage him, play with him, use it as a reinforcer for super fast respoonses to cues. Make it a time to work and have fun! It's clear he wants to engage, so help him do it in a way you do like, by working with him!
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Old 09-15-2012, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringerLover View Post
My thought is don't fight it! Engage him, play with him, use it as a reinforcer for super fast respoonses to cues. Make it a time to work and have fun! It's clear he wants to engage, so help him do it in a way you do like, by working with him!
I totally agree! I read about his problem it thinking "aww he sounds so cute" An aspect to successful positive training is learning what rewards your dog wants, what games your dog wants to play. If he likes playing with stuff out and about more than he likes shredded chicken, then you can use that in training. Teach it as an impulse control game, if he can walk a couple steps he gets the leash to tug on or a stick to play with. Then a couple more and a couple more. Stop focusing so much on the taking a walk aspect for now and take him out to work with him instead. Especially since he's getting plenty of exercise otherwise. Take him one on one for sure and probably for quite some time, he needs and deserves one on one time now. There is plenty of time for him to learn whatever behaviors you want to teach him, focus on having a great relationship with him now and everything else will come much easier.

And stop labeling him "stubborn", there doesn't seem to be anything stubborn about his playful behavior

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Old 09-15-2012, 10:37 AM
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^^ big agreement. I totally regret not allowing Arnold to engage and play like that and having to research him how to play 6 years later.
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Old 09-15-2012, 07:40 PM
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I'm going to go against the grain and say that I like to teach dogs when to switch on/ when it is time to play and when it is time to have manners. I don't want a dog that can't walk down the street nicely on leash. I'd be going back to basic loose leash walking training to teach him what behaviour you want to see when you are out walking on the street. Teaching leash manners doesn't mean he can't learn to play with you or that it will ruin his desire to play with you.
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Old 09-15-2012, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smeagle View Post
I'm going to go against the grain and say that I like to teach dogs when to switch on/ when it is time to play and when it is time to have manners. I don't want a dog that can't walk down the street nicely on leash. I'd be going back to basic loose leash walking training to teach him what behaviour you want to see when you are out walking on the street. Teaching leash manners doesn't mean he can't learn to play with you or that it will ruin his desire to play with you.
I don't think anyone suggested not teaching him to walk...just that she could also use his love of this game he made up on walks for training and relationship building. I even suggested how she could do that and work on lww.
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