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  #11  
Old 01-02-2006, 12:58 PM
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Gilshuman Gilshuman is offline
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Is this only when you are putting your shoes on? My border collie does the same thing, but will back off when told - but usually it just makes me laugh. I cant get my shoes on when I cant see what I am doing because he is in my face. I dont think you have a dominant dog problem. More likely is "OMG shes putting her shoes on = going outside= for a walk.. IM HERE , IM HERE, take me with you!" Only you can know if your dog is being dominant, but what you wrote sounds so similar to what Gil does. He only does it in the morning, knowing for sure when I put my shoes on we are going outside to play frisbee. I really think the getting in your face is "notice me". Gil is the most submissive border collie, I have ever owned and I have been graced with sharing my life with 4 and other breeds too.

Your dog sounds a lovely dog and you pushing him back could be taken as a game. Retraining him into a down before you take him out - should help if you find it a problem.

Last edited by Gilshuman; 01-02-2006 at 01:10 PM.
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2006, 06:30 PM
stina3246 stina3246 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanL
How is neutering him going to help? This is a training issue, not a hormone issue. Your dog is not full grown yet. Most people recommend you don't fix a GSD till they are full grown but it's your choice.

I think most GSDs are like yours. Mine is, I sit down to put on my shoes and he's right there investigating and giving out some love. I don't mind it and it's easy to put him in a down/stay to do what I need.
Well......Actually I've just always heard that you were supposed to neuter a dog ASAP. If that isn't the case I don't feel as guilty! I kinda felt like a bad dog mom.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2006, 06:33 PM
stina3246 stina3246 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilshuman
Is this only when you are putting your shoes on? My border collie does the same thing, but will back off when told - but usually it just makes me laugh. I cant get my shoes on when I cant see what I am doing because he is in my face. I dont think you have a dominant dog problem. More likely is "OMG shes putting her shoes on = going outside= for a walk.. IM HERE , IM HERE, take me with you!" Only you can know if your dog is being dominant, but what you wrote sounds so similar to what Gil does. He only does it in the morning, knowing for sure when I put my shoes on we are going outside to play frisbee. I really think the getting in your face is "notice me". Gil is the most submissive border collie, I have ever owned and I have been graced with sharing my life with 4 and other breeds too.

Your dog sounds a lovely dog and you pushing him back could be taken as a game. Retraining him into a down before you take him out - should help if you find it a problem.
Quinn does it ANYTIME we are at that level regardless of what we are doing. No...It isn't an agressive thing......he just wants to be there. It seems like most everyone is saying it is simply a training thing......which is good....I thought maybe he had a face fetish. LOL
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2006, 06:34 PM
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All my dogs did this but we taught them the down stay and after we finish putting our shoes on or dressing the kids whatever we are doing...we release with the word OK and they get a cookie if they held the down stay on the first command. Which now Hope adn Yukon do, Faith is 5 weeks old so she will need a little more time to get it all figured out.
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2006, 08:18 PM
stina3246 stina3246 is offline
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Is it just a german shephard thing that makes them want to be that close to you? or a dog thing. I've had puppies before, although not in a very long time. Quinn is the first young dog I've had in about 15 years (I usually get older dogs...my last one was an australian shephard who just passed away...he was 22!! But I don't remember any puppy doing this....Quinn is my first german shephard.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2006, 12:31 AM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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Mine do it, especially my Doberman. He respects me just fine as a leader. I don't believe it necessarily means he's being "dominant." I think that mentality about labeling every behavior a dog does in terms of pack behavior is overdone, personally. He sniffs sometimes to find out what I just ate. Or to be friendly. His ears go back, he wags his tail...his whole body language is being friendly. He sometimes gives a kiss and if I've had enough, I just say, "away." Or "enough." And he does. It's his way of greeting me. My Chihuahuas do this too. I invite them to because I like dog kisses. But they also will quit after a greeting. Licking our faces can also be construed as a submissive gesture if one wants to chalk this all up to pack behavior. Licking under the chin of a higher ranking dog is an acknowledgement of the lickers subordinate position to the lickee.

So, while I do see many behaviors as relating to instincts from being wild animals, I think perhaps trying to find a deep meaning to every behavior a dog does, gets us bogged down sometimes.

Train him to be obedient and if you don't like a certain behavior, teach him that there won't be any payoff for it, give an alternative for him and be consistant and it will go away. Be a confident, decisive, fair, kind but firm leader and work on obedience skills every day a little bit. He'll look up to you as his guide.


Quote:
Your dog sounds a lovely dog and you pushing him back could be taken as a game. Retraining him into a down before you take him out - should help if you find it a problem.
Great suggestion. Also, if he's getting excited to go out and he knows what putting on your shoes means....start putting on your shoes and not going right out. (I have to do this. My dogs all act silly when we're about to go for a walk and I'm putting on my shoes) But I don't really mind that behavior.
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2006, 12:57 AM
stina3246 stina3246 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doberluv




Great suggestion. Also, if he's getting excited to go out and he knows what putting on your shoes means....start putting on your shoes and not going right out. (I have to do this. My dogs all act silly when we're about to go for a walk and I'm putting on my shoes) But I don't really mind that behavior.
It isn't just when I put shoes on....it's ANYTIME I sit low enough for him to reach my face. He does it to my husband too. If we sit on the bed, the couch or anything for any reason he will want to shove his nose in our faces. He'll seem like he's getting better about it and then regress. I wouldn't mind if he just came over to say hi and get some lovin. It's that he won't back off at all. I'll keep working on the sit stay thing though. That seems to be unananimous. He is a pretty good dog otherwise. Come to think about it.....he does this with the horses too, to the point I can't let him out if the horses are in the pasture.....he bugs them so much they kick at him and normally they don't mind dogs. My gelding always liked my Aussie's company. I'm afraid they'll hurt him......especially the mule.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:04 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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Here are a few suggestions I hope will be helpful: Teach him calmly and decisively that that behaivor will earn him NOTHING. If he can't sit/stay, put him out of the room calmly...not punishingly, but simply implimenting social isolation. Do it AFTER he attempts to get in your face. "Oh...you are too close. You'll have to leave." Remove any payoff. He likes being in your face. Make it so he can't be in your face. When there comes a moment when he greets you without being in your face, nicely sitting....(sit/stay) praise him like crazy. Show him the contrast of what behavior you like and what behavior you don't. Show him what to do instead of sticking his face in your face and reward for his sitting nicely. Give no attention or payoff for that behavior you don't like. He's trying to get your attention, I guess, when he does this. Don't give it to him....good or bad. That behavior = no payoff. Good behavior = a very good reward. I would have special treats ready in your pocket. A dog will work very eagerly for something he loves. (not something you think he should love.) Most dogs love treats. Make sure your timing is good with rewards.

Another thing you can do is practice. Ask for a sit/stay while you're sitting on the couch a couple of feet back. Don't make him stay for very long at all. Reward. Reward before he can't stand sitting there any longer. You want him to be successful. Gradually ask for more from him.... a little longer and you can practice at gradually lengthened distances as well as close up. Don't reward if he stretches his nose out to you...only reward for a nice sit/stay.

Your dog should do what you ask IF he understands. If he doesn't understand, you can't expect him to not do some unwanted behavior. NILIF is a good, kind way to show your dog who is his leader and so is obedience training. Can you get him in a class with a positive method trainer?

Why don't you take a look at this site:
http://www.dogpatch.org/obed/obpage4.cfm

Here's NILIF: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/nothingfree.htm
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2006, 05:49 PM
Jynx Jynx is offline
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My GSD's are very in your face, in your business, always "nosing" around to see what your doing. However, it sounds like your problem is more a training issue , while he may be "obedient" he obviously isn't following thru with his commands, when you say sit, that's what it means, and it means you don't move until I release you.

He is a YOUNG dog as well, and I am all for a good obedience class which will not only teach your dog, but teaches an owner as well ..Good luck, you could have worse problems !
Diane
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2006, 09:42 PM
stina3246 stina3246 is offline
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Thanks for the suggestions....we can't really afford classes right now but teaching him to sit-stay should be fairly easy....he's a smart dog. I understand positive training and timing...I train horses. I have been working on this with him in the last few days and I think I see improvment.
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