Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dog Food and Recipes


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-25-2012, 03:08 AM
UpTheIrons's Avatar
UpTheIrons UpTheIrons is offline
Active Pup
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Jersey
Posts: 28
Default Best Food for Dog Prone to Bladder Stones?

My mother's dog had surgery to remove stones in her bladder many many years ago. The vet told my mother to purchase Science Diet, and of course she did as the vet said. She has not had any bladder stones on Science Diet, but I would prefer her to go on a better quality food. What would you suggest for her to switch over to thats of higher quality but still helps prevent stones from forming?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-25-2012, 06:35 AM
StephyMei1112's Avatar
StephyMei1112 StephyMei1112 is offline
Blackout
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: No fixed abode.
Posts: 922
Default

I'm unsure of a food that specifically is designed for that (I could be wrong of course) - but off the top of my head, Halo is worth a try - it's very gentle and really good for sensitive dogs or dogs prone to alot of allergies. Firstmate is a good quality food with very limited ingredients - it has a lower protein content though so just be ok with that before you try it.

Good luck and hope your mom's dog is doing better!
__________________
Feudin' and fightin' and a-fussin,'
That's all that's goin' on with us'n!
We are such neighborly people, peaceful and sweet!
All except when we happen to meet.


Stories, Poetry, and Musings
http://inugami1112.wordpress.com/

"And it's all been lost before, so there's nothing to lose..."


"There are those that love dogs insanely and those that don't. But once you like a dog, you're sunk. You're a dog person for life."

UKC Kuvasz Standard
AKC Kuvasz Standard
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-25-2012, 08:36 AM
Barb04's Avatar
Barb04 Barb04 is offline
Love my pets
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 27,145
Default

From what I'm reading, it says to make sure the dog gets plenty of water to flush out their system. Some vets were saying to feed canned food so they get lots of moisture in their system. There are many high quality food out there. I wonder if a grain free food would be best. I would talk to your vet and do some more research.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-25-2012, 08:38 AM
Brattina88 Brattina88 is offline
treehugging clicker freak
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: OH
Posts: 12,848
Default

I think I read wet food is good... But not my area of expertise. Personally I would do raw. You could always float the kibble.
__________________

Maddie CGC .:. Cocker Spaniel .:. 12 y/o
Bailey CGC .:. Shetland Sheepdog .:. 5 y/o
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-25-2012, 07:10 PM
houlahoops's Avatar
houlahoops houlahoops is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 783
Default

Liberty has specialized canned food but it's really expensive. I'll check the name etc tonight.

Also make sure the dog is staying hydrated as that can also be a contributing factor.
__________________
Emily and Pippa v. Johnson-Haus
"Well, don't let me be the moldy cheese in your refrigerator of hope." - Justin McKee



http://ejfoden.wix.com/efinkart
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-25-2012, 09:59 PM
elegy's Avatar
elegy elegy is offline
overdogged
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 7,706
Default

what kind of bladder stones?
__________________
ARCHX Luce CD CD-H RA RL3 RLV RL2X RL1X CGC TT
Steve RA RL1 CL1-R CL1-F ONYX
Bean FDCh-G
and Hambone, flyball hopeful
Save the pit bull, Save the world
Are you Unruly?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-25-2012, 10:28 PM
UpTheIrons's Avatar
UpTheIrons UpTheIrons is offline
Active Pup
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Jersey
Posts: 28
Default

I dont think my mother knows what kind. i will ask her though. Chloe had them probably 7 or 8 years ago, and it has not happened since. The vet said she needs low protein food to keep it from happening again. Thanks everyone for their replies so far.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-25-2012, 10:50 PM
Greenmagick's Avatar
Greenmagick Greenmagick is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 3,086
Default

http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/iss...s_16215-1.html

excerpt
Quote:
Fact or fiction?
All of the following statements are believed by many veterinarians and their clients. Yet none of them are true. Which have you heard before?

1. Urinary struvite crystals represent disease and require treatment.

2. Struvite crystals require a change in diet, usually to a prescription diet like c/d, u/d, or s/d.

3. Dogs prone to forming struvite stones should be kept on a special diet for life.

4. The most important treatment for dogs with a history of struvite stones is a low-protein diet.

Here’s why these common beliefs are misconceptions.

1. The presence of urinary struvite crystals alone does not represent disease and does not require treatment. These crystals can be found in the urine of an estimated 40 to 44 percent of all healthy dogs and are not a cause for concern unless accompanied by signs of a urinary tract infection. According to the Merck Veterinary Manual (2005), “Struvite crystals are commonly observed in canine and feline urine. Struvite crystalluria in dogs is not a problem unless there is a concurrent bacterial urinary tract infection with a urease-producing microbe. Without an infection, struvite crystals in dogs will not be associated with struvite urolith formation.”(Our emphasis.)

Whether your struvite-crystal dog has a urinary tract infection is the key question. Researchers estimate that more than 98 percent of all struvite stones are associated with infection. Failing to eradicate the original infection and prevent new bacterial infections is the main reason struvite uroliths recur. A recurrence rate of 21 percent was recorded in one study, but the risk can be significantly reduced through increased surveillance and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. In one study, dogs were infected with an experimental Staphylococcal urinary tract infection, and their infection-induced struvites grew large enough to be seen on X-rays within two to eight weeks.

2. Struvite crystals do not require a change in diet. Because struvite crystals do not pose a problem unless the dog has a urinary tract infection, there is no required treatment for crystals, including dietary changes. If the dog does have a urinary tract infection, a prescription dog food will not cure it.

If your veterinarian finds struvite crystals in the urine and suggests a diet change, you’d be well advised to find a new vet. You have to wonder how many other things he or she is misinformed about. It isn’t just a case of not keeping up with newer research; this recommendation is just plain wrong.

3. Dogs prone to forming struvite stones should not be kept on a special diet for life. Struvites almost always form because of infections, for which dogs with a history of stones should be closely monitored and properly treated. No long-term dietary change is required, nor will a special diet prevent the formation of infection-induced struvites. However, short-term changes may help speed the dissolution of stones.

4. Low-protein diets do not prevent stone formation. A low-protein diet can speed the dissolution of struvite stones -when accompanied by appropriate antibiotic treatment -but it is not necessary for the prevention of struvite formation in dogs who are prone to this problem. For almost all dogs, controlling infections will prevent more stones from forming.

The lowdown on low-protein
Several prescription dog foods are marketed as a treatment for struvite crystals and struvite stones. These are called calculolytic foods or diets, and nearly all of them are severely protein-restricted, phosphate-restricted, magnesium-restricted, highly acidifying, and supplemented with salt to increase the patient’s thirst and fluid consumption.

While a low-protein diet is not required to dissolve struvite stones, it can speed their dissolution (when accompanied by appropriate antibiotic treatment). Protein provides urea, which bacteria convert or “hydrolyze”into ammonia, one of the struvite building blocks. However, this approach is not a long-term solution and will not prevent the formation of infection-induced stones. Feeding a low-protein diet to an adult dog to help dissolve stones is acceptable for short periods. Because they are not nutritionally complete, however, low-protein foods are harmful to adult dogs if used for more than a few months, and they should never be fed to puppies.

If stones are not present, there is no reason to feed a low-protein diet. According to Dr. Chew, “No studies exist to show that a specific diet is helpful for the prevention of infection-related stone development.”

In general, the benefits of a meat-based diet far outweigh the risks posed by protein’s ammonia generation. Plus, by feeding your dog a home-prepared diet of fresh ingredients, you can provide food that is higher in quality and much more to your dog’s liking than diets that come out of cans or packages.

Other prescription pet food strategies -such as keeping the diet low in fiber so that fluids are not lost through the intestines, using highly digestible ingredients for the same reason, and increasing the dog’s fluid intake by adding salt to the diet -can be better accomplished with a home-prepared diet and management techniques that encourage the dog to drink more water. The more concentrated the urine, the more saturated it becomes with minerals that can precipitate out, so extra fluids, which dilute the urine, reduce the risk.

Urinary acidifiers are not used to dissolve or prevent stones caused by urinary tract infections, since acidification does not help while an infection is present.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-26-2012, 01:11 AM
UpTheIrons's Avatar
UpTheIrons UpTheIrons is offline
Active Pup
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Jersey
Posts: 28
Default

Thanks for posting that Greenmagick! I will be sure to show this to my mother, and suggest to her to look for a new vet!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-26-2012, 07:27 AM
elegy's Avatar
elegy elegy is offline
overdogged
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 7,706
Default

However, other types of stones/crystals (ie Calcium Oxylate) are different.
__________________
ARCHX Luce CD CD-H RA RL3 RLV RL2X RL1X CGC TT
Steve RA RL1 CL1-R CL1-F ONYX
Bean FDCh-G
and Hambone, flyball hopeful
Save the pit bull, Save the world
Are you Unruly?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:26 PM.


©1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site