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Old 06-22-2012, 10:26 PM
JessLough JessLough is offline
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Default I don't know if we have any members near Sudbury, but it's a Parvo epidemic...

If anybody's near Sudbury, please be careful and be sure your dog(s) is vaccinated. I already know 3 people whose dogs have been affected

http://www.northernlife.ca/news/loca...c-sudbury.aspx
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Old 06-23-2012, 03:10 AM
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Thanks for sharing, I live in Sudbury and never pay attention to the news. Are the 3 people you know with affected dogs in Sudbury?
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Old 06-23-2012, 03:17 AM
JessLough JessLough is offline
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Thanks for sharing, I live in Sudbury and never pay attention to the news. Are the 3 people you know with affected dogs in Sudbury?
No, but one was visiting in Sudbury, so they can't say for sure where where it came from, as she was diagnosed once she got back home.

And no problem, a rescue group I'm somewhat with posted it on Facebook so I just grabbed it off there
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Old 06-24-2012, 03:45 PM
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Yikes! Thanks for the heads up. I was planning on bringing my new girl with me to visit family that way. I will triple check that she has had her parvo shots first.
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Old 06-24-2012, 05:00 PM
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Were your friend's dogs vac'd or is this a resistant strain
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Old 06-24-2012, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Keechak View Post
Were your friend's dogs vac'd or is this a resistant strain
The "new vaccine resistant strain of Parvo" is a bit of an internet myth. There is cross-immunity with different strains of Parvo, so much so that a feline distemper vaccine is effective against the "new strain" of Parvo (which affects cats as well).

This talks in depth about the strains, new and old of Parvo:

http://sheltermedicine.com/node/246

Most notably:

Quote:
The research to date shows that all currently available vaccines protect against all known strains of CPV, including the newer CPV-2c strain 1,2,3. Some of the evolution of the CPV appears to give new strains small selective advantages in nature, and in some cases those can eventually replace the old variants. For example the original CPV-2 strain from 1978 is not found in nature today as it was replaced in 1980 by the CPV-2a variant. The CPV-2a is still the common virus circulating in the USA and around the world, and the CPV-2b and CPV-2c variants essentially differ from that 1980 virus at a only one or two amino acid positions 4,5.

There is no evidence that CPV-2c is a more serious threat to either shelter or owned dogs than the other CPV strains. It is not possible to distinguish CPV-2c from CPV-2b or -2a isolates based on clinical signs or parvo snap tests. CPV-2c causes similar clinical signs as the previously known strains, including mucoid or hemorrhagic diarrhea, leukopenia, and lymphopenia. Although a few reports suggest that CPV-2c may cause more severe clinical signs than -2a and -2b, others describe less-severe disease and lower mortality rates in CPV-2c infected dogs. There is no evidence, nor reason to believe, that the susceptibility of CPV-2c to disinfectants is different than other strains of parvovirus. All parvoviruses are environmentally persistent and resist inactivation by some common disinfectants, including quaternary ammonium compounds and alcohol. However, all strains can be reliably inactivated by correctly applied disinfectants documented to inactivate parvoviruses, including sodium hypochlorite (household bleach diluted at 1/2 cup per gallon) and potassium peroxymonosulfate (e.g. Trifectant ).

CPV-2c is not known to be a particular diagnostic challenge, and is expected to cross react with commonly used ELISA tests just as other strains do10. To distinguish the CPV-2c from CPV-2a/2b requires DNA sequence analysis or PCR 3; however there seems to be little or no clinical use for these tests, as vaccine or management principles are not different.
Also Veterinary Partners discusses it briefly here:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Con...?P=PRINT&A=583

Quote:
The most common form of the virus is called CPV-2b. Virtually all dogs can be considered to have been exposed to it at least to some extent, which means that most adult dogs, even those inadequately vaccinated, can be considered to have at least some immunity. It is also worth mentioning the new particularly virulent strain of parvovirus: CPV-2c, which is rapidly becoming the second most common form of canine parvovirus. CPV-2c was discovered in the year 2000 and is able to infect cats. Cats vaccinated against feline distemper can be considered protected. Currently available vaccines cover all variants of canine parvo including CPV-2c as do all the commercially available diagnostic test kits.
And much more detailed on this FAQ that is all about CPV-2c (the "new" strain of Parvo):

Quote:
Q:

Is there a vaccine for CPV-2c?

A:

Although there is no vaccine to specifically prevent CPV-2c infection, studies have shown that all of the currently available vaccines produced by the five major vaccine manufacturers (Fort Dodge Animal Health, Intervet, Merial, Pfizer and Schering-Plough), when administered appropriately, provide excellent immunity to all variants of the canine parvovirus.

Puppies should receive a dose of canine parvovirus vaccine between 14 and 16 weeks of age, regardless of how many doses they received earlier, to develop adequate protection.
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:47 PM
JessLough JessLough is offline
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Originally Posted by Keechak View Post
Were your friend's dogs vac'd or is this a resistant strain
Depends who you ask. Dog was a private rehome, old owners say that yes, she had the vaccine.

Honestly, I think this is a great example of "herd immunity". People don't get their dogs/kids/themselves vaccinated against something, because "everybody else is vaccinated, so it's not a problem". Which it's not... until there IS a problem -- then it's a huge problem.
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Old 06-24-2012, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by JessLough View Post
Depends who you ask. Dog was a private rehome, old owners say that yes, she had the vaccine.

Honestly, I think this is a great example of "herd immunity". People don't get their dogs/kids/themselves vaccinated against something, because "everybody else is vaccinated, so it's not a problem". Which it's not... until there IS a problem -- then it's a huge problem.
Just because a dog has had a vaccine or multiple vaccines doesn't mean they were able to develop immunity from them. Some animals will never develop immunity, no matter how many or what kind of vaccines they are given. So it is possible that the dog did have vaccines and that was the case. Or it is possible the dog had immunity from the vaccine but for whatever reason, it was not strong enough to fight off the virus. It is also possible that the dog was never vaccinated, since it sounds like there was no record. Or it's possible the dog has some underlying immune issue that makes her more susceptible than a normal dog would be. Was a SNAP test done to verify the dog did indeed have Parvo? Or was she diagnosed based on clinical symptoms. If it's the later, the dog may not have even had Parvo, as the symptoms for it can differ greatly in individuals and are shared with many other illnesses.

In modern times it is extremely uncommon for adult dogs to develop Parvo and when they do, it is generally a much more mild form. The reason puppies are so susceptible is because Parvo attacks the rapidly dividing cells in the still developing intestinal tract of puppies. When I had a litter with Parvo, no other dog in the household developed it, including older dogs who hadn't been vaccinated for years. I had a 16 week old fully vaccinated puppy at the house too and she also did not develop symptoms. Out of my litter of 6 puppies, one puppy didn't develop any symptoms at all and the ones who did, symptoms ranged from mild to moderate to severe to fatal.

Parvo is everywhere, it would be impossible to control it even if everyone vaccinated. It affects puppies too young for vaccines most often (mine were 6 weeks old and had never left my house/yard), some dogs can't develop immunity from vaccines and wild animals such as wolves, coyotes and foxes are also affected by it. There is truth that vaccinating a large percentage of the population can be of benefit and that is already common practice. But Parvo is pretty much unavoidable and that is nothing new.

From the Veterinary Partners links I posted earlier:

Quote:
While the parvoviruses of other species have been well known for decades, the canine parvovirus is a relative newcomer. The original canine parvovirus, discovered in 1967 and called CPV-1 did not represent much of a medical threat except to newborn puppies but by 1978, a new variant, CPV-2 appeared in the U.S. This newer version seems to represent a mutation from the feline parvovirus (which is more commonly known as the feline distemper virus). Because this virus was (and is) shed in gigantic numbers by infected animals, and because this virus is especially hardy in the environment, worldwide distribution of the virus rapidly occurred. At this time, the virus is considered to be ubiquitous, meaning that it is present in EVERY ENVIRONMENT unless regular disinfection is applied.

Attempting to shield a puppy from exposure is completely futile.
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  #9  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:17 PM
JessLough JessLough is offline
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Originally Posted by Aleron View Post
Just because a dog has had a vaccine or multiple vaccines doesn't mean they were able to develop immunity from them. Some animals will never develop immunity, no matter how many or what kind of vaccines they are given. So it is possible that the dog did have vaccines and that was the case. Or it is possible the dog had immunity from the vaccine but for whatever reason, it was not strong enough to fight off the virus. It is also possible that the dog was never vaccinated, since it sounds like there was no record. Or it's possible the dog has some underlying immune issue that makes her more susceptible than a normal dog would be. Was a SNAP test done to verify the dog did indeed have Parvo? Or was she diagnosed based on clinical symptoms. If it's the later, the dog may not have even had Parvo, as the symptoms for it can differ greatly in individuals and are shared with many other illnesses.

In modern times it is extremely uncommon for adult dogs to develop Parvo and when they do, it is generally a much more mild form. The reason puppies are so susceptible is because Parvo attacks the rapidly dividing cells in the still developing intestinal tract of puppies. When I had a litter with Parvo, no other dog in the household developed it, including older dogs who hadn't been vaccinated for years. I had a 16 week old fully vaccinated puppy at the house too and she also did not develop symptoms. Out of my litter of 6 puppies, one puppy didn't develop any symptoms at all and the ones who did, symptoms ranged from mild to moderate to severe to fatal.

Parvo is everywhere, it would be impossible to control it even if everyone vaccinated. It affects puppies too young for vaccines most often (mine were 6 weeks old and had never left my house/yard), some dogs can't develop immunity from vaccines and wild animals such as wolves, coyotes and foxes are also affected by it. There is truth that vaccinating a large percentage of the population can be of benefit and that is already common practice. But Parvo is pretty much unavoidable and that is nothing new.

From the Veterinary Partners links I posted earlier:
I am quite aware that the dog may not get immunity from the shots. I doubt that numbers of dogs this high, in one area, just didn't he the immunity.

It may be "rare", but this is a lot of dogs of all ages dying from Parvo.

Regardless, if you'd like to debate the usefulness of vaccines, you can make a thread for that. I posted this solely so people who are not willing to take the chance are aware.
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  #10  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JessLough View Post
I am quite aware that the dog may not get immunity from the shots. I doubt that numbers of dogs this high, in one area, just didn't he the immunity.

It may be "rare", but this is a lot of dogs of all ages dying from Parvo.

Regardless, if you'd like to debate the usefulness of vaccines, you can make a thread for that. I posted this solely so people who are not willing to take the chance are aware.
I'm a pretty outspoken supporter of vaccinating puppies and young dogs for Parvo. Maybe you are confusing my feelings on vaccinating ferrets with my feelings on vaccinating dogs?

Your purpose of posting this doesn't mean it can't or won't result in discussion directly related to the topic, especially if misinformation is posted such as there being a "vaccine resistant strain", which is a common misconception. It is a dog discussion forum after all

Just how many is a lot of adult dogs dying of Parvo in what period of time?
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