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  #11  
Old 06-24-2012, 11:44 AM
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lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
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Of course it does depend on context. But to me, targeting means zeroing in on an object or a specific place on the object. We often use a "target," usually a small-ish flat object like a plastic yougurt lid, or also a hand, or a bite sleeve, or whatever, to teach the dog to target - focus in on a small place. It's usually followed by some learned behavior, like a nose touch, hand touch, bite, etc.

So in service dog training, when we teach, for example, the dogs to push the lightswitch with their nose, it's really two separate behaviors: target the lightswitch (find it, go to it), and then push it. When we teach retrieve, a very important step is teaching the dogs how to deliver the item, how to target our hands and put it there. So again, that's two steps: target (find) my hand, and put the object into it.
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Old 06-24-2012, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily View Post
Neither definition is incorrect. It's just a matter of context.
As with much of the English language.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
Of course it does depend on context. But to me, targeting means zeroing in on an object or a specific place on the object.
That's pretty much my definition, too.
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Old 06-24-2012, 01:37 PM
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Thanks.

Been working on it as "touch" last few days. Apparently it was too easy. First day I worked on the idea with lure and waiting for him to do it himself. Caught on prerty quick. Later that day he offered it when I was eating a sandwich. Tried random objects yesterday.

Today...his new default behavior is to nose anything close enough when he thinks I want something.
Bacon. The great motivator.

How far can you build this? He's going to get bored and moody again soon.
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  #14  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:50 PM
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You're teaching him to touch things with his nose?

The service dogs I train use this to push doors and drawers closed, cabinet doors, refridgerator, etc. (pretty much anything that's reasonably light enough for them to move). They push light switches, automatic door buttons, even moving limbs, like when your arm or leg falls off of your wheelchair and you don't have the strength to move it back.

I think it's used in treball to teach dogs to move the balls. It's sometimes used in agility at the bottom of contact obsticles to teach dogs to stop on the contacts.

So I guess what I'm saying is, get creative!
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Old 06-24-2012, 11:03 PM
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Yep, with his nose. Making him understand he has feet is something else entirely, and he already offers 'shake' a lot, so I'll have to find a way around it to make him think with his feet...but not shake. And put a new word to it, although he's doing really well without the "touch" verbal cue, just with me pointing.

Thanks for the ideas!
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Old 06-24-2012, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Lyzelle View Post
Yep, with his nose. Making him understand he has feet is something else entirely, and he already offers 'shake' a lot, so I'll have to find a way around it to make him think with his feet...but not shake. And put a new word to it, although he's doing really well without the "touch" verbal cue, just with me pointing.

Thanks for the ideas!
Teaching descrimination between touching with their nose and touching with their feet is VERY VERY DIFFICULT. I've personally never seen a trainer succeed. The service dogs I train are pretty much never taught to paw anything, they always just use their noses. I know of other groups that teach paw only, never nosing. But I don't know of any groups that teach pawing for some things and nosing for others, because it's so incredibly difficult.
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Old 06-24-2012, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
Teaching descrimination between touching with their nose and touching with their feet is VERY VERY DIFFICULT. I've personally never seen a trainer succeed. The service dogs I train are pretty much never taught to paw anything, they always just use their noses. I know of other groups that teach paw only, never nosing. But I don't know of any groups that teach pawing for some things and nosing for others, because it's so incredibly difficult.
wow, now you have me very curious!
Bates “targets” with his feet if I put something on the ground and he “touches” with his nose if I put a sticky note on a vertical surface, but now that you mention it, he does make that vertical/horizontal distinction. Now you have me wondering if I can put a “target” object on a wall and see if he’ll use his feet or his nose.... hrm....
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