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  #21  
Old 05-31-2012, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by nikkiluvsu15 View Post
I don't think it is for everyone, but I think it can be effective. It was effective for me and math isn't my best subject.

I also didn't learn exclusively from the video. My mom still taught me and we also had a tutor (who scored perfect on both the ACT and SAT!) who would help us if we had any questions.


The videos that I used were recorded in an actual classroom. So I was learning what the students in the classroom were, just watching via DVD instead.
Right, but if you have questions during the video, you have no one to ask unless your tutor is watching the videos with you. That would be cost prohibitive here, I think, where private tutoring runs around $75/hour for middle school math! I'd guess it's even higher at the high school level. Still cheaper than private school though, I suppose.

(I scored perfect on my SAT's (and the SAT II's) too, but I don't think that alone qualifies me to teach high school math! The SAT is capped at a 9th grade level, I think.)

Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of issues with public school. If I had a motivated kid one on one, I could teach them a year's worth of math material in 4-5 months instead of 9, thanks to the yahoos in the classroom who slow things down. I still think it's a better model for the vast majority of math learners though, unless the parent (or other teacher) is well-versed and competent in math/physics/chem/etc.
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  #22  
Old 05-31-2012, 05:13 PM
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ahh, but the normal reading age is 7....force it too early and you can ruin it for the child. Just playing devil's advocate. I know children who were forced to learn early (homeschooled and traditionally schooled) and because it was hard and a struggle, they resent it and took a really long time to learn to read for enjoyment (if they ever got to that). I also know of children who didnt start til 7,8,9 but were immediately reading WAY above their grade level, comprehending it and more importantly enjoying it. Not everyone learns at the same pace...my son was walking at 9 months, my daughter at 13. There is no set age that things magically happen.

Definitely not for everyone, but bad examples exist in both places. Schools are also changing more and more....some now dont even allow talking at lunch and there are precious few moment for "socialization".
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  #23  
Old 05-31-2012, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
Right, but if you have questions during the video, you have no one to ask unless your tutor is watching the videos with you. That would be cost prohibitive here, I think, where private tutoring runs around $75/hour for middle school math! I'd guess it's even higher at the high school level. Still cheaper than private school though, I suppose.

(I scored perfect on my SAT's (and the SAT II's) too, but I don't think that alone qualifies me to teach high school math! The SAT is capped at a 9th grade level, I think.)

Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of issues with public school. If I had a motivated kid one on one, I could teach them a year's worth of math material in 4-5 months instead of 9, thanks to the yahoos in the classroom who slow things down. I still think it's a better model for the vast majority of math learners though, unless the parent (or other teacher) is well-versed and competent in math/physics/chem/etc.
I did have my mom to ask questions, if I needed too. As well as my older siblings! But, honestly, the videos I used were SO good about explaining it. Like I said, it isn't for everyone. My siblings used it as well and they also thought it was good.

I only used my tutor for the ACT test, so it wasn't very cost prohibitive for us. I can see where it can be for others though.

Oh, I don't think scoring perfect on the SAT/ACT qualifies you either. I was just throwing that in there because I had never met anyone who had scored perfect before
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  #24  
Old 05-31-2012, 05:44 PM
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How does it affect university application? How do parents know whether they are doing a good enough job of it? When you get into high school, how can one person teach everything at a high enough level? Are co-ops basically the only viable way to do it?
It doesn't seem to affect university application in the least. Parents know the same in homeschool as they do in public school or private school. Testing, knowing the material, and here in PA you work with a mediator every year (usually you find a mediator you like and they are your mediator for your entire homeschool "career"). They come in and administer testing, you keep work examples and work completed and curriculum stuff etc etc and they look it over and help you out if you ask for help because many of them have been doing this for many years with many families. One of the more popular mediators that many people in one of our co ops use is a former public school teacher, turned homeschooler, turned mediator.

how can one person teach everything... that I'll answer in the next part of my post.

Co ops are not the only viable way but I do love our co op and plan to join a second co op this year when Hannah starts kindergarten (which she would not be allowed to do this year in public or private school because her birthday falls after the start of September... so she would not be allowed to start kindergarten until next year)

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Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
I can't imagine trying to learn higher level math or math-based sciences (chemistry, physics) from a video

Just about everything else I think would be doable. With the internet available for discussions and debates, you can mimic the classroom discussions you'd find in a traditional classroom, and with most subjects you can learn everything you need by reading tons if that's your style.

I just can't see the vast majority of people being successful learning algebra or calculus from a video or a textbook. The Khan academy model (watch a video, apply what you learned) model for math is failing miserably because that's just not how the majority of kids learn. They need to ask questions, interact with others, do exploratory activities, etc.
You can't imagine learning from video but other students thrive with that sort of learning. That's the beauty of homeschooling. What doesn't work for you might work GREAT for someone else and what does work for you might not work for someone else. In homeschooling you get the option to learn the best way possible for you. If a student tries the video way and it doesn't work... they are free to try the next option.

There are SO many resources available to homeschoolers that there is almost certainly a way to teach them that subject in a way that works for them. There are videos, there are online classes, there are classes they can take within the community (in lancaster there are all kinds of teachers that run homeschool classrooms for certain subjects), there are classes through the local college here they can take... the list goes on and on and on. The resources are endless.

Homeschooling when done incorrectly can be terrible... but when done right it can be Oh so amazing.

I know it's hard to imagine but hundreds (if not thousands) of kids in Lancaster county alone do it every single year and THRIVE.

there are endless resources and an incredible support system here.

and the best part... if you find homeschooling isn't working for you or your child you are FREE to switch them into public or private school, or charter homeschool, or any other number of options. It's not "once a homeschooler always a homeschooler" you can start out in public school and switch to homeschooling and vice versa.

The freedom to individualize learning so that child learns in a way that works best for them. By the time they get to algebra and calculus it's likely the child and the parent have a very good handle on how that child learns best and if you try something and it doesn't work... change it

It's a beautiful thing.

As for the socialization thing mentioned earlier in the thread, I think that's a personality issue and not a strictly homeschool vs public school issue. Hannah is no slouch when it comes to being social. She is extremely social with ALL ages of people from baby to adult. That's her personality and I nurture it as best I can.
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  #25  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:09 PM
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ahh, but the normal reading age is 7....force it too early and you can ruin it for the child.
...I was reading in preschool. ROFL Now I know why my mom thought that was great!

I was home schooled from grade 3 to freshman level, then went to a very small private school for three years of high school (I'm talking there were maybe twelve of us in my graduating class).

I'm currently about ready to graduate Purdue University with a BS - being home schooled and then going to a very small private school didn't effect my application process at all.
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  #26  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:14 PM
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Wait whhhhattt? You can only homeschool in that state religiously? Through a church?

And FWIW, most homeschoolers I know do not use many, if any, standardized tests so its definitely a case by case basis. That is actually a big reason I homeschool, I think standardized tests tell us nothing but that the person is good at testing (and I always did great....LOVED them! but not everyone learns the same)
Like I said, I believe that is the way it is done in the state I reside. Each state is different, and no, you do not have to homesschool and go to a particular church. There are a few churches in town that are set up to 'cover' homeschoolers in our area. If you wanted more information on this subject, Homeschool Legal Defense Association, is a great place to check out.

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Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
I can't imagine trying to learn higher level math or math-based sciences (chemistry, physics) from a video
Aside from what Sparks as said, some choose to take higher level math via dual-enrollment from college teachers.
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  #27  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:17 PM
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Aside from what Sparks as said, some choose to take higher level math via dual-enrollment from college teachers.
Another good resource I disn't think of and have no experience with yet
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  #28  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:25 PM
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I couldn't imagine being homeschooled.... But I also had an awesome school experience, socially and academically. But schools are a lot different in Germany.... I still secretly hope that we'll end up there should we have a child eventually.

I wish there were more rules and regulations with it. While people on here seem to have good experiences and appear well-rounded, it's also clear that that's because of great parent input. I've had a family over at my house to pick up a bunch of landscaping river rocks... And that lady was chatting up a storm with me. She couldn't speak 3 sentences without any grave grammatical errors, but told me as proud as possible that she honeschools her 6 (!!) children. All of them were your typical stereotype of what you think a homeschooled kid acts like. Didn't say anything at all, didn't hold eye contact, just very very awkward. And folks like that scare me and I wish someone would look over their shoulder to ensure that these kids get the fundamentals they need to succeed in life.
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  #29  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:36 PM
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Sparks - awesome post! I tried to quote parts I agreed with, but I pretty much agree with everything you said.

Yes, dual-enrolling at the college is so great. I loved doing that my junior/senior years!

I didn't take my math there, but I know of quite a few home schooled students who did take their math at the local community college. It is a win-win situation because you get credit for both high school and college!
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  #30  
Old 05-31-2012, 06:42 PM
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Only dues paying members of the NEA should be teaching.

My dad used to teach high school and my stepmom is a President of English at a large university. They left the education of my little sister in the hands of professionals of the NEA in the public education system.

Obviously only professionals should be doing the teaching.

Obvious troll is trolling.
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