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Old 03-07-2012, 11:13 AM
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Arrow Do you like cilantro? Read this.

What an amazing food! If you read this, be sure to read at the bottom, the contraindications and side effects.

http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/benefits-of/cilantro

The problem is, I don't like it. Well...I like it in pico de gallo type salsa. But that's it. I remember reading that it was good for the liver a long time ago, so I would put a handful in Lyric's food when he had liver disease. I first chopped it up in the blender and it made my whole house smell that way. Now, I want to like it, so I have to somehow brainwash myself because I must eat this stuff. The health benefits are so outstanding. Next trip to the grocery store will include cilantro and I'm going to sneak it into some meals whether I like it or not.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:15 AM
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I LOVE cilantro! It's soooo good. I have a pot of it in my apartment for when I make curry (which I do alot. ^^)
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:15 AM
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I use it in my salsas and a couple of soups. I find it overused in many recipes. Some people think that all you need to do to make salsa is to chop some tomatoes, onions and a buttload of cilantro. Overused like that, it tastes like snot.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:15 AM
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I've actually added it to burgers. Wasn't planned, but I add all sorts of stuff, mix it up then grill. The other night I had some cilantro left over from some soup and didn't want to waste it, so I chopped it and threw it in the hamburger. I thought it was good. I'm not a big recipe person though, just throw stuff together and hope for the best.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:23 AM
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I love cilantro! It is one of those things that is either loved or hated though isn't it? LOL

I think I'm the only one in this house that really likes it though, most of them just tolerate it (in small doses) in my cooking.

My oldest and youngest have a............shall we say........intestinal reaction to anything with too much cilantro. It's pretty immediate.......like within 30 minutes or so usually. I looked it up once and apparently, it's not uncommon for cilantro allergies, who knew?
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:23 AM
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I love cilantro! We've used it in turkey burgers and it's wonderful.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:24 AM
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I should have posted the whole thing, not just the link. But in the link are pictures. lol. Anyhow, here it is to make it easier. It's just amazing to me what they think the benefits nutritionally are. The history of it is interesting too.

Eddie, you sound like me. Well, I think you better see if you can talk yourself into liking it more because it sounds like one of those things they call, "super" foods.

Gypsy, that's great that you have some growing. It IS good in curry dishes, I must admit. I just don't like it to be over powering. Maybe I'll grow some too. I plan on growing my own basil because it's my favorite and I use a lot of it. It's very expensive to buy in the store. In fact, I need to start it now indoors to get a jump start on the growing season here.

Quote:
The Health Benefits of Cilantro
Learning Center » Benefits Of » The Health Benefits of Cilantro

source
Cilantro is featured in dishes cooked everywhere from Spain to Mexico, the Middle East to the South America. The fresh leafs are often sprinkled over the tops of dishes, and the root is used in Thailand to give that distinctly powerful flavor to local dishes. You may already know that cilantro is one of the main ingredients in the salsa at your favorite Mexican restaurant.

Cilantro, also known as coriander, has a distinct aroma due to its concentrated essential oils. This captivating aroma may have been responsible for humans around the world intuitively incorporating cilantro into their diets for health reasons that modern science is just beginning to understand.

The History of Organic Cilantro
While it's difficult to prove where exactly this powerful herb may have originated, experts suggest that this valuable plant hails from the Near East or southern Europe due to the fact that these regions contain large amounts of the herb growing in the wild.³ Archeologists have also found remnants of cilantro cultivation in the tombs of the ancient Egyptians, including that of the famous King Tutankhamen.¹

Cilantro was also cultivated in ancient Greece; the leaves being used for foods, and the robust essential oil being used for perfume-making. The Romans then introduced the herb to what is now modern day England during medieval times, where it was used to mask the smells of rotten meat. From Europe, the British brought cilantro to the North American colonies in 1670, and it has been a popular staple in the Americas ever since.²

The Health Benefits of Cilantro

source
This herb isn't just a commonly-used leaf and seed ingredient found in many tasty and exotic recipes, it's also a powerful natural cleansing agent. Cilantro has been effectively used to help remove heavy metals and other toxic agents from the body.

The chemical compounds in cilantro actually bind to the heavy metals, loosening them from the tissues, blood and organs. Cilantro's chemical compounds then aid to transport these harmful substances out of the body through elimination.

There is also a large amount of literature suggesting that cilantro could be one of nature's best chelation agents, particularly for individuals who have been exposed to heightened levels of mercury. Mercury excess is a common problem that may be the result of metallic teeth fillings or over-consumption of predatory fish. Many people suffering from excess mercury report that the feeling of disorientation resulting from the poisoning can be greatly reduced through consuming large and regular amounts of cilantro over an extended period.

Also, the rich qualities of cilantro oil have a powerfully positive effect on our inner digestive tract. The oils aid our digestive system in its production of digestive enzymes, acids and juices. The oil also helps to stimulate digestion through peristaltic motion.

The known benefits of cilantro are extensive, and researchers are discovering more every day. Currently, there are several well-known, well-documented benefits of organic cilantro, including:

List of Cilantro Benefits:
Powerful anti-inflammatory capacities that may help symptoms of arthritis
Protective agents against bacterial infection from Salmonella in food products
Acts to increase HDL cholesterol (the good kind), and reduces LDL cholesterol (the bad kind)
Relief for stomach gas, prevention of flatulence and an overall digestive aid
Wards off urinary tract infections
Helps reduce feelings of nausea
Eases hormonal mood swings associated with menstruation
Has been shown to reduce menstrual cramping.
Adds fiber to the digestive tract
A source of iron, magnesium, and is helpful in fighting anemia
Gives relief for diarrhea, especially if caused by microbial or fungal infections
Helps promote healthy liver function.
Reduces minor swelling
Strong general antioxidant properties
Disinfects and helps detoxify the body
Stimulates the endocrine glands
Helps with insulin secretion and lowers blood sugar
Acts as a natural anti-septic and anti-fungal agent for skin disorders like fungal infections and eczema
Contains immune-boosting properties
Acts as an expectorant
Helps ease conjunctivitis, as well as eye-aging, macular degeneration, and other stressors on the eyes.
James A. Duke, Ph.D., a former botanist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and author of The CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, states that cilantro has been shown to settle the stomach. He recommends drinking a cup of the tea made from a handful of the leaves, when experiencing any form of stomach discomfort.4

Natural Compounds in Organic Cilantro

source
Cineole and linoleic acid are two primary components of organic cilantro that contain anti-rheumatic and anti-arthritic properties. These two components also help purge extra water present in the body due to swelling. Cilantro also contains oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Each of these elements are effective in lowering high cholesterol in the blood, as well as the internal walls of the veins and arteries.

Borneol and Linalool, other components of cilantro, work to cleanse the liver and reduce diarrhea. As well as Cineole, Limonene, Alpha-pinene & beta-phelandrene. Each of which contains anti-bacterial properties. The Citronelol component is a well-known natural antiseptic, helping to reduce bad-breath, heal mouth-wounds and prevent oral ulcers. It also contains high amounts of vitamin-A, and important minerals like phosphorus.

The best known chemical found in cilantro is a substance called Dodecenal. In a recent study led by Isao Kubo, Ph.D at the University of Berkeley, laboratory tests have shown that this component of cilantro is two times as potent as the commonly-used allopathic antibiotic medicine, gentamicin. This is the same antibiotic used to kill Salmonella, a potentially deadly food-born disease. Researchers believe that cilantro is the only natural antibacterial agent that is more effective than gentamicin. These same researchers are even looking into using organic cilantro oil as a way to eradicate the ever-growing problem of allopathic antibiotic resistance.5

The Cultivation of Organic Cilantro
Cilantro, or Coriandrum sativum, is from the Apiaceae family, and is an annual herb. Organic Cilantro is grown without the use of chemical pesticides, fertilizers and with a clean water source. This soft plant normally grows to about 50 centimeters tall. The fresh, raw leaves and seeds are used medicinally and as a cooking herb, although the entire plant, including the root, is edible. It is easy to grow cilantro in an indoor herb garden, or in a pot or herb garden outside. To best grow cilantro, plant it in an area that will receive full sun. The soil should be kept well-drained but constantly moist.

Side Effects or Contraindications of Organic Cilantro
While many sources state that cilantro has little to no adverse side effects, there are some sources that warn that cilantro leaf should not be used during pregnancy, as it may lead to an increase chance of miscarriage in mothers, or may reduce chances of conception in women trying to become pregnant. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, please consult with your health care provider before consuming cilantro in any form.

Recommended Reading:
Tips for Growing Cilantro
15 Foods High in Vitamin E
11 Foods High in Calcium
10 Foods High in Vitamin D
References
John Chadwick, The Mycenaean World (Cambridge: University Press, 1976), p. 119
Fragiska, M. (2005). Wild and Cultivated Vegetables, Herbs and Spices in Greek Antiquity. Environmental Archaeology 10 (1): 73-82
Daniel Zohary and Maria Hopf, Domestication of plants in the Old World, third edition (Oxford: University Press, 2000), p. 206
Changes in Volatile Compounds of ?-Irradiated Fresh Cilantro Leaves during Cold Storage. Xuetong Fan* and Kimberly J. B. Sokorai. Eastern Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania 19038
Antibacterial Activity of Coriander Volatile Compounds against Salmonella choleraesuis. Isao Kubo, et. al. Journal of Agric. Food Chem., 2002, 50 (26), pp 7622-7626. Published 2002 American Chemical Society
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:27 AM
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I LOVE growing fresh herbs..........there is no comparison between dried and fresh, once you've cooked/eaten fresh, going back to dried (in the winter) SUCKS! LOL

I wish I had good places to grow it all year long, sadly I don't. I do hanging baskets in the summer and dry some in the fall (before frost) for winter use.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:28 AM
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I love cilantro. I have a pot growing on the windowsill and I'll be planting it outside when it gets warm enough.

Interestingly, my mother HATES cilantro.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:34 AM
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Oh yes, for cooking, the only way to fly is fresh. In fact, many of the potent oils are lost in drying. This lead me to look up basil, which I really, really love. It smells so good and tastes good in all kinds of things. It's also really healthy. And it mentions something about similarities to marijuana's benefits without the high. lol. (what's the point?) J/K. I've never even smoked marijuana. I guess many herbs have super nutrients and benefits in them.

http://www.offthegridnews.com/2011/0...fits-of-basil/

Quote:
Medicinal Uses and Health Benefits of Basil

Apr 21st, 2011 | By Carmen | Category: DIY Health Treatments, Health | Print This Article
Basil is a common herb in most of our kitchens, but did you know that, besides tasting good in our chicken and pasta dishes, it can be of use toward having more healthy bodies? It is an excellent alternative health treatment for many minor ailments.

Grown originally in Asia and the Middle East, basil traveled the world along the spice trail. It has been grown and used for 5000 years and has hundreds of varieties and is now cultivated in many countries. All of its varieties have unique and individual chemical make-ups; and yet the base medicinal properties remain consistent from one strain to another.

The volatile oils of dried basil are weak, so fresh basil is usually better in both our cooking and our healing treatments.

The main use of basil medicinally is as a natural anti-inflammatory. It is similar to the compounds found in oregano and medical marijuana – and may be used as a substitute for the later because it offers the same relief without the “high.” The same compound that makes it useful as an anti-inflammatory is also believed to help combat bowel inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

Many naturopathic doctors prescribe basil in treatment of diabetes, respiratory disorders, allergies, impotence, and infertility. This may be because basil contains cinnamanic acid, which has been found to enhance circulation, stabilize blood sugar, and improve breathing in those with respiratory disorders.

It is also know that basil is very high in antioxidants, especially when it is used as an extract or oil. These antioxidants can protect your body against free radical damage associated with aging, some skin ailments, and most forms of cancer. Antioxidants have become an important part of keeping our bodies healthy, and basil may be among the safest and most effective sources of these life-giving compounds.

Additional scientific research has shown that the volatile oils in basil, combined with their antioxidant effects, make it a great health boost for our immune systems.

Fresh basil leaves and basil oil have antibacterial properties. They can be used to disinfect surfaces. Leaves, applied to wounds, may eliminate infections. Basil used in your cooking or taken as a nutritional supplement can assist in combating common viruses like colds, flu, and the herpes family of viruses – in a manner similar to that of Echinacea.

TREATMENTS USING BASIL
Healing: Sharpen memory, use as a nerve tonic, and remove phlegm from your bronchial tubes. Repeat up to once an hour. Leaves can strengthen the stomach and induce perfuse sweating. The seeds can be used to rid the body of excess mucus.
Fevers: Basil leaves are used for quenching fevers, especially those related to malaria and other infectious, eruptive fevers common to tropical areas. Boiling leaves with some cardamom in about two quarts of water, then mixed with sugar and milk, brings down temperature. An extract of basil leaves in fresh water should be given every 2 to 3 hours; between doses you can give sips of cold water. This method is especially effective for reducing fevers in children.
Coughs: Basil is an important ingredient in cough syrups and expectorants. It can also relieve mucus in asthma and bronchitis. Chewing on basil leaves can relieve colds and flu symptoms.
Sore Throat: Water boiled with basil leaves can be taken as a tonic or used as a gargle when you have a sore throat.
Respiratory Disorders: Boiling basil leaves with honey and ginger is useful for treating asthma, bronchitis, cough, cold, and influenza. Boiling the leaves, cloves, and sea salt in some water will give rapid relief of influenza. These combinations should be boiled in about two quarts of water until only half the water remains before they are taken.
Kidney Stones: Basil can be used to strengthen your kidneys. In cases of stones in your kidney, the juice of basil leaves mixed with honey and taken daily for 6 months will expel them through the urinary tract.
Heart Problems: Basil can be used to strengthen those weakened by heart disease. It can also reduce your cholesterol.
Children’s Illnesses: Pediatric complaints like colds, coughs, fever, diarrhea, and vomiting have been know to respond to treatment with the juice of basil leaves. Also if the rash associated with chicken pox is delayed, basil leaves with saffron will bring them to the surface more quickly.
Stress: Basil leaves can be used as an anti-stress agent. Chewing 12 basil leaves twice a day can prevent stress. It will purify the blood and help prevent many other common ailments.
Mouth Infections: Chewing a few leaves twice daily can cure infections and ulcerations of the mouth.
Insect Bites: Basil can be used preventatively and as a curative. A teaspoonful of the basil leaf juice taken every few hours is preventative. Rubbing the bites with juice can relieve the itching and swelling. Also a paste of the root is effective for treating the bites of insects and leeches.
Skin Disorders: Basil juice applied directly to the effected area is good for ringworm and other common skin ailments. Some naturopaths have used it successfully in the treatment of leucoderma (patches of white or light-colored skin).
Tooth Problems: Dry basil leaves in the sun and grind into powder for a tooth cleansing powder. You can also mix with mustard oil to make herbal toothpaste. Both of these methods will counter bad breath and can be used to massage the gums, treat pyorrhea, and other dental health problems.
Headaches: Basil is a good headache remedy. Boil leaves in half a quart of water, cooking until half the liquid remains. Take a couple of teaspoons an hour with water to relieve your pain and swelling. You can also make a paste of basil leaves pounded with sandalwood to apply to your forehead to relieve headache and provide coolness in general.
Eye Disorders: Basil juice is a good for night-blindness and sore eyes. Two drops of black basil juice in each eye at bedtimes each day is soothing.
________________________________________

DISCLAIMER: Please remember these treatments options are only meant as guidelines and in no way replaces the advice or treatment provided by your medical practitioner. It is always good to seek the advice of your physician, homeopath, naturopath, or herbalist for professional advice in any matter related to your health. This article is for information purposes only.

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You Can Make Powerful Herbal Medicines Secretly in Your Kitchen
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