Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dogs - General Dog Chat


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 02-15-2012, 11:44 PM
Catsi Catsi is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 900
Default

Gee, I really love poodles, but for some reason they always seem like a bit too much 'dog' for me if that makes sense. I don't know if I have just met some really full on individuals or whether my perception is fair. But there is nothing more lovely than a poodle moving in that, 'I love myself' kind of way. They just seem to light up.

What about the utility gundogs? Such as Vizslas and GSPs? Or Springers?
Setters and Retrievers do strike me as typically confident for sure.

Unfortunately, I have only met two Koolies and both were really shy. I'm not saying it is indicative of the breed at all, but it goes to show how important first impressions are sometimes, as the meeting certainly left me thinking that they were anything but a confident breed. Having said that, I would be interested in meeting more in the future and two isn't exactly a fair sample to go on. They were quite possibly from the same breeding as well.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-15-2012, 11:54 PM
Saeleofu's Avatar
Saeleofu Saeleofu is online now
Jelly baby?
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 9,016
Default

I've never really thought of poodles as a lot of dog. Of course there are differences within the breed, though, as there is with any breed.

Most BYB collies I've met have NO drive to speak of, and a couple have very little in their brains it seems. Others are masterminds and WILL find something to do if unoccupied. Logan is a perfect balance to me - enough drive, but not over-the-top, frield with absolutely anything he meets, from dogs to people to small animals. And enough in his head that he's an absolute joy to train. He's a bright dog, and it does kind of suck when your dog outsmarts you, but he's not intent on figuring out EVERYTHING like some dogs are...at least not anymore. I still don't know how he learned to open doorknobs, but at least he doesn't use that power for evil anymore

Regardless of breed, find a GOOD breeder, and get to know their dogs and their lines. They should be honest about what you can expect from one of their dogs. If possible find someone who does early neurological stimulation and socializes the crap out of their dogs. You can find a dog that suits your needs in a large variety of breeds, but in the end it's less about the breed and more about the breeding/raising.
__________________


Vortex Canine - Custom Harnesses and Leashes

"Never cruel nor cowardly. Never give up. Never give in."
~The Doctor

Last edited by Saeleofu; 02-16-2012 at 12:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:02 AM
Emily's Avatar
Emily Emily is offline
Rollin' with my bitches
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 2,114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saeleofu View Post
You can find a dog that suits your needs in a large variety of breeds, but in the end it's less about the breed and more about the breeding/raising..
This is a great point. I'm not saying the breed doesn't matter, because it does, A LOT. There are many major and fine points that are often determined by breed. But, like Saeleofu says, variations within breeds often come down the individual animal's breeding more than anything.

For example, Catsi says she's met two extremely shy Koolies, and I don't doubt it. However, Traveler's (notable) breeder is known for producing outgoing, social, stable, adaptable dogs.

I also was never interested in Cardis at all, but Keeva's particular litter + the fact that her breeder had done just about everything to encourage her drive and spunk (instead of repressing it, as many in the breed would have), made her a good choice for me.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:04 AM
AdrianneIsabel's Avatar
AdrianneIsabel AdrianneIsabel is offline
Glutton for Crazy
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 8,886
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catsi View Post
Gee, I really love poodles, but for some reason they always seem like a bit too much 'dog' for me if that makes sense. I don't know if I have just met some really full on individuals or whether my perception is fair. But there is nothing more lovely than a poodle moving in that, 'I love myself' kind of way. They just seem to light up.

What about the utility gundogs? Such as Vizslas and GSPs? Or Springers?
Setters and Retrievers do strike me as typically confident for sure.

Unfortunately, I have only met two Koolies and both were really shy. I'm not saying it is indicative of the breed at all, but it goes to show how important first impressions are sometimes, as the meeting certainly left me thinking that they were anything but a confident breed. Having said that, I would be interested in meeting more in the future and two isn't exactly a fair sample to go on. They were quite possibly from the same breeding as well.


Every poodle I know has a ton of "UP!" They're very excitable, happy, bouncy, go-go-go and naughty at times in a comedic way. I can totally see where they would be extremely frustrating.

IME Vizslas and GSP are both friendly and can be "disinterested" in strangers. They can be a bit snarky and "easily annoyed" by other dogs but not overtly DA. The ones I know are always so busy focusing on a ball, bumper, treat, etc that they can't be bothered with external entities.

I have known way too many DA springers, every time I see one now I get a bit on edge. Arnold, my red head, was attacked by three springers at three parks and they were totally unrelated and unprovoked attacks. I'm a bit emotionally scarred, it sucks too they seem like really nice dogs otherwise.
__________________
Sloan von Krigbaum CGC BH CD NA NJ PD MJ-N RATI RATN 3/7/10 -
Shamoo NJ-N RATI RATN 3/1/98 -
Phelan du Loups du Soleil 6/15/13-

Arnold CGC TDI FD 6/29/04 - 07/05/13
Backup CGC HIC CD SRD SJ-N RATI 12/29/09 - 07/05/13

You were amazing, we did amazing things.


Harmony Canine, relationship based training.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:06 AM
Catsi Catsi is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily View Post
This is a great point. I'm not saying the breed doesn't matter, because it does, A LOT. There are many major and fine points that are often determined by breed. But, like Saeleofu says, variations within breeds often come down the individual animal's breeding more than anything.

I definitely agree with this important point. Variation is going to occur within all breeds for sure. I guess I'm trying to get a head start lol. Lots and lots to think about.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:08 AM
Catsi Catsi is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdrianneIsabel View Post
Every poodle I know has a ton of "UP!" They're very excitable, happy, bouncy, go-go-go and naughty at times in a comedic way. I can totally see where they would be extremely frustrating.

IME Vizslas and GSP are both friendly and can be "disinterested" in strangers. They can be a bit snarky and "easily annoyed" by other dogs but not overtly DA. The ones I know are always so busy focusing on a ball, bumper, treat, etc that they can't be bothered with external entities.

I have known way too many DA springers, every time I see one now I get a bit on edge. Arnold, my red head, was attacked by three springers at three parks and they were totally unrelated and unprovoked attacks. I'm a bit emotionally scarred, it sucks too they seem like really nice dogs otherwise.
Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, maybe it's just that poodles are very 'up' dogs that gives me that impression. Absolutely lovely, but maybe I'm not quite the right owner for one. I'd definitely note them down for further research though.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:09 AM
Emily's Avatar
Emily Emily is offline
Rollin' with my bitches
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 2,114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catsi View Post
I definitely agree with this important point. Variation is going to occur within all breeds for sure. I guess I'm trying to get a head start lol. Lots and lots to think about.
Nothing wrong with a head start. Your definitely criteria does allow you to rule out some breeds in general.

Now, I live not too far from a working BC breeder with dogs you'd love. Socially stable, quite outgoing, dog neutral unless given a reason not to be. Wouldn't normally list BC's under "socially confident" but there's that variation for you.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:09 AM
Michiyo-Fir Michiyo-Fir is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,337
Default

Goldens, Labs, Pugs seem to come to mind.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:20 AM
Catsi Catsi is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily View Post
Nothing wrong with a head start. Your definitely criteria does allow you to rule out some breeds in general.

Now, I live not too far from a working BC breeder with dogs you'd love. Socially stable, quite outgoing, dog neutral unless given a reason not to be. Wouldn't normally list BC's under "socially confident" but there's that variation for you.
Yes, there will always be those exceptions. I guess really the most important thing is making sure I am 100% comfortable with the breeder and their dogs. My parents' Stafford (who is from a BYB) is absolutely lovely - a really confident dog and not DA. In fact her responses to other dogs are very appropriate, but that's not to say she would not fight back if she had to. I personally wouldn't have her out at the dog park because she plays too rough for most dogs and is a little too gregarious to manage safely (in other words, she would be a dog park pest if left to her own devices) BUT she is also a dog that I have no fear walking in the neighbourhood. If a dog runs up and is friendly, she is fine with them. If they are aren't friendly, yes I worry. But I'd be worried anyway... whether my dog was DA or not. So I guess a non-DA Stafford can be an option. It just goes back to increasing my chances of getting the 'right' dog I guess.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 02-16-2012, 12:23 AM
Emily's Avatar
Emily Emily is offline
Rollin' with my bitches
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 2,114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catsi View Post
It just goes back to increasing my chances of getting the 'right' dog I guess.
Absolutely. And it's great that you have clear ideas of what you want.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:58 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site