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  #51  
Old 01-03-2012, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ravennr View Post
these street dogs are melting my heart!!

i am a HUGE fan of the Portuguese Podengo and for some reason there are actually a significant number (and by that i mean i've seen about five in two years) in rescue here. i thought maybe it's because i'm so close to such a major city now and not out in the sticks of the world, comparatively. the pariahs are in my top three of types to own no matter what my boyfriend says (he is forever stuck on Frenchies, complete opposite end of the spectrum indeed!). i only worry that i could potentially be doing these dogs a disservice based on my location. that's not to say anyone who owns these dogs in a likewise cold climate is doing their dogs a disservice, but it would be very new to me to own a dog like that where the winters are so cold.
what sort of precautions do you have to take with these dogs and the cold, in general? would a sweater and jacket really be enough in -25C weather with some snow on the ground?
Well I don't have a mexidog (yet? I MAY end up with one if Grace finds one that fits my temperament/personality guidelines though.) but I DO have a Doberman that is a complete weather wuss and balks at anything under 65-70 degrees (Fahrenheit). It's only winter for a couple of months and Saga has the full assortment of cold weather gear. She has booties, a snood ( to keep her ears close to her head to avoid frostbite) several sweaters/coats/etc. We also don't really do much in the way of outdoor activities when it's cold, it is pretty much just potty breaks. Granted Saga is a very lazy dog, and doesn't bug me to do stuff, but if she did or if future pup needs to, I have a friend who owns a dog daycare that gives me free reign to use her indoor space after hours and it's HUGE! We also have a Bass Pro shop and some other dog friendly businesses in the area, and while that wouldn't provide much in the way of exercise, it does give a lot of mental stimulation. I don't see "cold" as an issue, really, no more than the heat of summer and trying to work around that, too.
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  #52  
Old 01-03-2012, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Aleron View Post
I'd personally still take my chances with a young puppy, if I decided a Mexi-dog was what I had to have Of course, I wouldn't just be taking a "random puppy". I'd look for the things I always look for when I get a puppy. To me, the early phases of puppyhood are just too important to pass up.
This. If I do get a Mexipup, well, Grace has my laundry list of traits/quirks/whatever on hand and in addition to that, she and I have been talking for years, so she has a pretty good grasp on my personality and what would suit me, even if it wasn't something I directly mentioned. I would definitely like to find a dog sport, or 17, to play in, but no matter if future pup ends up being a mexipup or a Dutch shepherd, we are going to do what is best suited to us as a team. As I was saying, I have a lot of dog sport interests, but I haven't quite "picked" a favorite yet. For me, I think the best option is having a pup with a "jack of all trades, master of none" (ok maybe SOME, lol) attitude.
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  #53  
Old 01-03-2012, 06:34 PM
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It does indeed seem that pariah-type street dogs are extremely similar the world over. Several of my customers at work have Taiwanese street dogs, and one has a Mexican street dog. All rescues from when they were travelling abroad. They all have similar traits - medium-sized, slender, short-coated, tall ears, though some are flopped, wedgey heads - but also have different overall body types and personalities. I'm finishing a portrait for one of them right now, I'll definitely share when I'm done!
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  #54  
Old 01-03-2012, 06:37 PM
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We have a cuba-dog in a local rescue:

http://windycityrescue.wordpress.com.../21/hola-taco/

That's all i have to contribute.
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  #55  
Old 01-03-2012, 07:04 PM
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The issue is no matter who has your list.. a little puppy isn't going to show enough of those characterisitcs, or be 'set' in them yet. Many of the puppies that I have had have changed quite a bit from 4 months to 6 months. Ie the rough housing agressive little poop head ended up being great with other dogs, the quiet one ended up being crazy high drive... Some like Kat and Dekka were easy to pick out even then with Kat it took her to almost a year before she wasn't a 'scary' puppy. I had no idea if she was goign to be talented but highly aggressive to everything. She wasn't.. she grew out of wanting to attack people...

My point being is that if someone like Grace has a puppy in her care it will be getting socialized. If as it gets older its traits improve or stay what you want then its safe. I know many a well educated dog person has picked a young pup from proven lines and still gotten in wrong. This is just adding more variability.
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  #56  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dekka View Post
My point being is that if someone like Grace has a puppy in her care it will be getting socialized. If as it gets older its traits improve or stay what you want then its safe. I know many a well educated dog person has picked a young pup from proven lines and still gotten in wrong. This is just adding more variability.
But um isn't that an argument for never getting a puppy under 6 months regardless of breed/source?! If all of them are crap shoots, then does it really matter the lineage?! And can't a knowledgeable dog owner do the same socialization at home, with a younger puppy?

There are huge differences between developmental periods (i.e. socialization windows) and total behavioral turnaround imo/e. Yes, there will be outliers and life experiences that change a dog's behavior, but in general I think that what you see around 12-16 weeks is a good guideline on the general behavior of the dog as an adult.

For reference, I've gotten my current 4 dogs all around 3-5 months of age and all have been exactly what I expected (tho Snipe is still in process lol), if not even more awesome, and three are mutts not bred for anything particular. 4 for 4 isn't just chance imo.
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  #57  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stardogs View Post
But um isn't that an argument for never getting a puppy under 6 months regardless of breed/source?! If all of them are crap shoots, then does it really matter the lineage?! And can't a knowledgable dog owner do the same socialization at home, with a younger puppy?

For reference, I've gotten my current 4 dogs all around 3-5 months of age and all have been exactly what I expected (tho Snipe is still in process lol), if not even more awesome, and three are mutts not bred for anything particular. 4 for 4 isn't just chance imo.
Ditto.
4 out of 4 is AWESOME lol
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  #58  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:42 PM
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I also think it depends on what you are looking for.

For most people, if you get a young pup without major issues and work hard at it, if the dog is physically capable and has any drive at all upon which you can expand, you can get a decent obedience/agility/etc. dog. More than adequate for a casual competitor anyway.

I mean Kim came scared, malnourished, and with a very strong "flight" response to all things unexpected (which is probably the reason she was the one pup to survive after being abandoned til rescue was called), and with really no interest at all in people (other than as possible threats or sources of change), etc. and after massive informal socialization and training with a total (mentor-less) rookie with her first dog, much less first competition dog, she was nationally ranked in rally, titled in obe, and is now going for her MACH and often placing in classes of 20, 30+ dogs many of whom are in the top 5 for their breed nationally.

I'm not that special. I'm not that great of a trainer. And I'm not even that lucky. Dogs are just really resilient, in general, and it's amazing what they are capable of given a chance. Even ones with crappy starts to life.

Now if you are looking for the next NAC/NOC, the parameters start to change. You ideally want a dog with abnormally high drives but stable...excellent structure...strong social drive...mental resilience...things that probably won't show up as a very young mystery pup in a reliable way. But honestly when people on a forum ask if a type of dog would be great at agility or whatnot, I generally interpret that as whether the dog would be able and willing to play at agility on a locally competitive level. Because if they were looking for that NAC/NOC dog, if they were serious about it, they probably wouldn't need to be asking the question, or at least not on a general forum like this
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  #59  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:48 PM
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It is a crap shoot. But less of a one when you know genetically what the puppy should be predisposed to be like. This is why people in general like proven lines. Kat was a horrid puppy, but matured fantastically. If its in the genes its a much safer bet.

Same reason people pay big dollars for horses from proven lines, its still a crap shoot.. but much better odds than going to an auction and buying a random pretty and well behaved foal.
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  #60  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shai View Post
I also think it depends on what you are looking for.

For most people, if you get a young pup without major issues and work hard at it, if the dog is physically capable and has any drive at all upon which you can expand, you can get a decent obedience/agility/etc. dog. More than adequate for a casual competitor anyway.

I mean Kim came scared, malnourished, and with a very strong "flight" response to all things unexpected (which is probably the reason she was the one pup to survive after being abandoned til rescue was called), and with really no interest at all in people (other than as possible threats or sources of change), etc. and after massive informal socialization and training with a total (mentor-less) rookie with her first dog, much less first competition dog, she was nationally ranked in rally, titled in obe, and is now going for her MACH and often placing in classes of 20, 30+ dogs many of whom are in the top 5 for their breed nationally.

I'm not that special. I'm not that great of a trainer. And I'm not even that lucky. Dogs are just really resilient, in general, and it's amazing what they are capable of given a chance. Even ones with crappy starts to life.

Now if you are looking for the next NAC/NOC, the parameters start to change. You ideally want a dog with abnormally high drives but stable...excellent structure...strong social drive...mental resilience...things that probably won't show up as a very young mystery pup in a reliable way. But honestly when people on a forum ask if a type of dog would be great at agility or whatnot, I generally interpret that as whether the dog would be able and willing to play at agility on a locally competitive level. Because if they were looking for that NAC/NOC dog, if they were serious about it, they probably wouldn't need to be asking the question, or at least not on a general forum like this
Aw Kim got VERY lucky with you! I am so surprised she came THAT far.

And I am not special or a good trainer either, but I know with guidance on here and some patience, I can do it.

I am not looking for the next best agility dog or the next nationally ranked rally dog, by no means.

I want a companion, a dog I can dapple into agility, a dog I can go do stuff with like hiking, camping, etc. I want a companion, first and foremost, and I know everything else will follow through.
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