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  #21  
Old 12-26-2011, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by AKC Breed Standard
Temperament
Character is a primary and outstanding asset of the Flat-Coat. He is a responsive, loving member of the family, a versatile working dog, multi-talented, sensible, bright and tractable. In competition the Flat-Coat demonstrates stability and a desire to please with a confident, happy and outgoing attitude characterized by a wagging tail. Nervous, hyperactive, apathetic, shy or obstinate behavior is undesirable. Severe Fault--Unprovoked aggressive behavior toward people or animals is totally unacceptable.

Character
Character is as important to the evaluation of stock by a potential breeder as any other aspect of the breed standard. The Flat-Coat is primarily a family companion hunting retriever. He is keen and birdy, flushing within gun range, as well as a determined, resourceful retriever on land and water. He has a great desire to hunt with self-reliance and an uncanny ability to adapt to changing circumstances on a variety of upland game and waterfowl.

As a family companion he is sensible, alert and highly intelligent; a lighthearted, affectionate and adaptable friend. He retains these qualities as well as his youthfully good-humored outlook on life into old age. The adult Flat-Coat is usually an adequate alarm dog to give warning, but is a good-natured, optimistic dog, basically inclined to be friendly to all.

The Flat-Coat is a cheerful, devoted companion who requires and appreciates living with and interacting as a member of his family. To reach full potential in any endeavor he absolutely must have a strong personal bond and affectionate individual attention.
Sounds about right. Mira is more on the "look at something weird and then interact" side than just flying in without a thought and hoping it all turns out okay. Doesn't take her long to go from "hm?" to "okay!" but she is a bit more of a thinker about things which I like. Unless it's in the way of a retrieve in which case...well there's the retrieve. Must retrieve. OMG the retrieve.

Optimistic, enthusiastic, independent while working and generally cheerful about the human race but devoted about all else to family and person. Happy and unfazed by all environments -- it was so nice to just put her in competition without segue...no need to generalize her on every piece of equipment in the world or people watching, etc. She was totally unfazed from day 1.

Birdy, naturally working the flush at appropriate distance, etc., yes. We'll be working on proving out those instincts this year as they are an integral part of the FCR instinct package.
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  #22  
Old 12-26-2011, 09:08 AM
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The Cardigan Welsh Corgi equals big personality in a little dog. These are intelligent, active, alert little guys who will want to be the center of your world. They love to be with their families, and will shower you with loyalty, devotion and affection. They need daily exercise and love to take long walks with you. They are intelligent and eager to please and do great with obedience training. They excel in obedience, agility, flyball, Frisbee, herding, and tracking competitions. They get along very well with respectful children, but parents need to be aware that Corgis might try to herd kids. (They also might try to herd other animals and your houseguests.) Most Corgis like to be with other cats and dogs. They are adaptable dogs and can live anywhere as long as they get walked, but they do like to bark, so close neighbors might object. While personalities differ within the breed, in general, the Corgi is even-tempered, hardy, friendly, loyal and loving. And they are always full of fun.
Keeva's pretty spot on. She's slowly getting more aloof with strangers, much to the dismay of my extended family on Christmas Eve, LOL. And it's true aloofness, not fear. She'll go to strangers and give them a moderately interested greeting, and then run to ME and give me kisses instead. Ahahaha. Of course, if they have food or a toy, then they can have all attention they want. Also, as Lindsey pointed out, "Traveler goes up to people like, 'I LOVE YOU!!!' and Keeva approaches them like, 'LOVE ME NOW!!!!'"

The affectionate thing... not so much, not yet at least. She has not yet learned the benefits of slowing down long enough to enjoy petting. She does give lots of kisses and is always happy to see me, and she does sleep cuddled up against my legs at night, though. I have heard that the strong sense of self-sufficiency is in part a bitch thing, and also something that may change with time, particularly after a heat cycle or two.

Def alert, def LOUD - she not only alert barks, but she barks just to express herself - excitement, frustration, etc.

For sure easy to train, definitely intelligent, but not what the average person would consider well-behaved or trainable. For some one good with R+, easy. For most people, who want the dog to just "do it because", not easy. At all. Good luck with that. LOL.

"Full of fun" describes her to a T. I don't even know how to explain it, but I always tell people she's the funniest dog I've ever known. She is just ALWAYS looking for a good time, and the way that she moves and the expression on her face make it look like she's laughing.

I think it was Aleron on here who said something that always stuck with me. I can't remember exactly, but she said something like, "Corgis don't know the meaning of the word owner," and, "They're loud and they love fun."

I think that's the most succinct description of Keeva, LOL.

Macky fits her breed standard perfectly. She's an ideal specimen of a Fluzz Dog.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:07 AM
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I'm not sure if Harleigh is full Lab and I definitely know that if she is full Lab she isn't well bred, but with that being said...

From The Labrador Retriever Club, Inc.

Quote:
True Labrador Retriever temperament is as much a hallmark of the breed as the "otter" tail. The ideal disposition is one of a kindly, outgoing, tractable nature; eager to please and non-aggressive towards man or animal. The Labrador has much that appeals to people; his gentle ways, intelligence and adaptability make him an ideal dog. Aggressiveness towards humans or other animals, or any evidence of shyness in an adult should be severely penalized.
Harleigh fits that description pretty well, except she is pretty shy... she does warm up fast most times (especially if food is involved, lol).

Now from a "not so reliable" source (i.e. Wikipedia):

Quote:
Labradors' sense of smell allows them to hone in on almost any scent and follow the path of its origin. They generally stay on the scent until they find it (Omg yes). Labradors instinctively enjoy holding objects and even hands or arms in their mouths, which they can do with great gentleness (a Labrador can carry an egg in its mouth without breaking it). They are also known to have a very soft feel to the mouth, as a result of being bred to retrieve game such as waterfowl. They are prone to chewing objects (though they can be trained out of this behavior).

Labradors have a reputation as a very even-tempered breed and an excellent family dog. This includes a good reputation with children of all ages and other animals. But some lines (particularly those that have continued to be bred specifically for their skills at working in the field rather than for their appearance) are particularly fast and athletic (definitely this!).

Their fun-loving boisterousness and lack of fear may require training and firm handling at times to ensure it does not get out of hand—an uncontrolled adult can be quite problematic. Females may be slightly more independent than males. Labradors mature at around three years of age; before this time they can have a significant degree of puppy-like energy, often mislabelled as being hyperactive (3 y/o is only a couple months away... wonder if a switch will go off ).

Because of their enthusiasm, leash-training early on is suggested to prevent pulling when full-grown. Labradors often enjoy retrieving a ball endlessly and other forms of activity (such as agility, frisbee, or flyball).

Although they will sometimes bark at noise, especially noise from an unseen source ("alarm barking"), Labradors are usually not noisy or territorial. They are often very easygoing and trusting with strangers, and therefore are not usually suitable as guard dogs.

Labradors have a well-known reputation for appetite, and some individuals may be highly indiscriminate, eating digestible and non-food objects alike. They are persuasive and persistent in requesting food. For this reason, the Labrador owner must carefully control his/her dog's food intake to avoid obesity and its associated health problems.

The steady temperament of Labradors and their ability to learn make them an ideal breed for search and rescue, detection, and therapy work. They are a very intelligent breed. They are ranked # 7 in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs. The AKC describes the breed as an ideal family and sporting dog. Their primary working role in the field continues to be that of a hunting retriever.
Quote:
They do not typically jump high fences or dig. Because of their personalities, some Labradors climb and/or jump for their own amusement. As a breed they are highly intelligent and capable of intense single-mindedness and focus if motivated or their interest is caught. Therefore, with the right conditions and stimuli, a bored Labrador could "turn into an escape artist par excellence".

Labradors as a breed are curious, exploratory and love company, following both people and interesting scents for food, attention and novelty value..

Labradors are powerful and indefatigable swimmers noted for their ability to tolerate the coldest of water for extended periods of time.
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  #24  
Old 12-26-2011, 10:55 AM
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Daisy the lab fits it as far as being highly food driven and loving to retrieve (frisbee more than ball), and she does have a soft mouth (even as a puppy she didn't mouth a lot, and what mouthing she did was gentle).

However Daisy does NOT like everyone, and her temperament is not happy and bubbly but fearful and nervous. She also isn't terribly fond of swimming. She will play in the hose and wade in the man-made lake in my parents' neighborhood, but she's never actually wanted to swim.

And for Miles the roomie's dog (from the AKC's website):

Quote:
The Pomeranian is an extrovert, exhibiting great intelligence and a vivacious spirit, making him a great companion dog as well as a competitive show dog.
He fits that pretty well. He isn't yappy like people stereotype the breed. He only barks if someone comes to the door. He is terrified of other dogs, but with people he is pretty outgoing and likes to throw himself upon a newcomer's lap the instant they sit down on the couch. I would also say he's he's quite smart, in a quiet, cunning sort of way.
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:08 AM
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USING THAT WEBSITE...

Lucy - the bits in black are true, the bit in reds untrue about Lucy.
Quote:
The Greyhound, the fastest couch potato in the world, is a sweet, gentle, affectionate, adaptable, docile, loyal, intelligent, and loving creature. Yes, they are athletic, and yes, they are fast, but they don't necessarily want to use it. They are prone to short bursts of energy followed by long naps. In fact, they often like to sleep most of the day away. They are mellow and laidback and make excellent house pets. They have a moderate need for exercise, and a couple of short walks per day should meet their needs, unless it is raining, in which case they will be happy to take the day off. They must be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area at all times, because if a Greyhound gets away from you, you might never see him again. He can spot a squirrel a half mile away and take off, quickly reaching a speed of 40 mph. They are the second fastest land creature on earth, and not reliable on the recall. For this reason, people should not walk a Greyhound on a retractable leash. By the time a Greyhound reaches his top speed at 25 feet away from you, he can easily yank the handle out of your hand and run across town, all the while afraid of the thing bouncing along behind him. Also, never, ever tie a Greyhound to a pole. He might try to take off and break his own neck. A Greyhound parent must pay close attention to the conditions outside, because Greyhounds are temperature sensitive and can easily get too cold or too hot. While they are eager to please the ones they love, they still have the independent spirit of a hound, and need patient and consistent obedience training. They are usually quick to housetrain. They are sociable with people and with other dogs, and many Greyhounds do well with cats. To be safe, do not let your Greyhound and cat outside to "play" together, as the Greyhound's chase instinct may kick in. Greyhounds are tolerant of children and do very well with them. The Greyhounds are sensitive and children need to be polite, or the Greyhound will try to get away from them. A Greyhound will want to be with you as much as possible, and won't want to be left alone for long periods of time. They absolutely thrive on being the center of your attention. Greyhounds, particularly rescued Greyhounds, attach to their owners in a unique and powerful way. They do not however, make very good watchdogs, as they are very quiet and rarely bark, unless they are playing, or chatting it up with other Greyhounds.
Todd - again, black is true, red is untrue about Todd.
Quote:
The Greyhound, the fastest couch potato in the world, is a sweet, gentle, affectionate, adaptable, docile, loyal, intelligent, and loving creature. Yes, they are athletic, and yes, they are fast, but they don't necessarily want to use it. They are prone to short bursts of energy followed by long naps. In fact, they often like to sleep most of the day away. They are mellow and laidback and make excellent house pets. They have a moderate need for exercise, and a couple of short walks per day should meet their needs, unless it is raining, in which case they will be happy to take the day off. They must be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area at all times, because if a Greyhound gets away from you, you might never see him again. He can spot a squirrel a half mile away and take off, quickly reaching a speed of 40 mph. They are the second fastest land creature on earth, and not reliable on the recall. For this reason, people should not walk a Greyhound on a retractable leash. By the time a Greyhound reaches his top speed at 25 feet away from you, he can easily yank the handle out of your hand and run across town, all the while afraid of the thing bouncing along behind him. Also, never, ever tie a Greyhound to a pole. He might try to take off and break his own neck. A Greyhound parent must pay close attention to the conditions outside, because Greyhounds are temperature sensitive and can easily get too cold or too hot. While they are eager to please the ones they love, they still have the independent spirit of a hound, and need patient and consistent obedience training. They are usually quick to housetrain. They are sociable with people and with other dogs, and many Greyhounds do well with cats. To be safe, do not let your Greyhound and cat outside to "play" together, as the Greyhound's chase instinct may kick in. Greyhounds are tolerant of children and do very well with them. The Greyhounds are sensitive and children need to be polite, or the Greyhound will try to get away from them. A Greyhound will want to be with you as much as possible, and won't want to be left alone for long periods of time. They absolutely thrive on being the center of your attention. Greyhounds, particularly rescued Greyhounds, attach to their owners in a unique and powerful way. They do not however, make very good watchdogs, as they are very quiet and rarely bark, unless they are playing, or chatting it up with other Greyhounds.
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  #26  
Old 12-26-2011, 11:20 AM
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http://www.akc.org/breeds/pointer/


Pointer
AKC MEET THE BREEDS®: Pointer

A hard-driving hunting dog possessing stamina, courage, and the desire to go, the Pointer is bred primarily for sport afield and definitely looks the part. He gives the impression of power and grace, with a noble carriage, an intelligent expression and a muscular body. His short coat can be liver, lemon, black, and orange; either in combination with white or solid-colored.

A Look Back
Pointers first appeared in England around 1650 and were the first breed used to stand game. Before wing-shooting with guns became popular, Pointers were often used to locate and point hares in conjunction with Greyhound coursing. The Pointer's lineage is foggy, but there is no question that it includes Foxhound, Greyhound, and Bloodhound crossed with some sort of "setting spaniel," which played an important part in the creation of all modern bird dogs.

Right Breed for You?
The Pointer's even temperament and alert good sense make him a congenial companion both in the field and in the home, but he requires both physical and mental exercise. He should be dignified, but should never show timidity toward man or dog. The breed’s short coat is easy to care with minimal effort.

that would be a yes for Victor.
The intelligence is just over the top and combined with the grace, the English Pointer just takes my breath away.
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  #27  
Old 12-26-2011, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron View Post
Are we talking about dogs matching their breed standard/parent club's description of the breed? Or random breed site descriptions? Or stereotypes?
Yeah I used the breed club's descriptions. I've seen so many AWFUL breed descriptions online. I've even seen at least two where their example 'papillon' is actually a chihuahua.

I actually really do like that website's description of the papillon though.

Quote:
The Papillon is a happy, lively, outgoing, affectionate lapdog who also loves to run and play--especially outdoors! He loves to cuddle and give kisses, and can be a calm, gentle and patient companion. But he's also a high-energy, fast-moving, go-getting athlete who needs a fair amount of exercise. He's always ready to play in the house and romp and roll around on the floor. He loves to take long walks, or to compete in dog-sports like agility. He is extremely easy to train and highly obedient: he has been named the number one toy obedience breed. He is very eager to please you and quick to learn new tricks. He craves the companionship of his owner and wants to be with you as much as possible, and needs to give as well as receive lots of attention and affection. He is very friendly with guests and will welcome them with polite kisses. He makes an excellent therapy dog. He is a good watchdog who will sound the alarm if something suspicious is happening. Sometimes he can bark too much, but he is not a yappy dog. He can sometimes take a while to housebreak, and is occasionally stubborn. He needs a daily walk and should always be leashed when outdoors, or allowed to play in a safely fenced area. You will need to check for small openings and holes in your fence that might allow him to get out. You need to supervise him around larger dogs, since he may bark sharply or jealously toward them and they can intentionally or unintentionally hurt his small body. He can be good with cats if raised with them, and is fine with smaller dogs. He is not recommended for young children because of his smallness and delicacy, but he loves older, well-behaved children. Both adults and children must be careful not to let him jump from high places, since he might hurt himself. He is a high-shedder, and so is not a good pet if you are concerned about dog-hair in the home.
The bold is true of all of them (although Rose is less apt to be very active). All of them are playful except for Summer.

Red is true of all of them but Mia.

I let mine off leash all the time and have no problems. I also let mine jump off of things.
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:30 AM
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USING THAT WEBSITE...

Lucy - the bits in black are true, the bit in reds untrue about Lucy.
Quote:
The Greyhound, the fastest couch potato in the world, is a sweet, gentle, affectionate, adaptable, docile, loyal, intelligent, and loving creature. Yes, they are athletic, and yes, they are fast, but they don't necessarily want to use it. They are prone to short bursts of energy followed by long naps. In fact, they often like to sleep most of the day away. They are mellow and laidback and make excellent house pets. They have a moderate need for exercise, and a couple of short walks per day should meet their needs, unless it is raining, in which case they will be happy to take the day off. They must be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area at all times, because if a Greyhound gets away from you, you might never see him again. He can spot a squirrel a half mile away and take off, quickly reaching a speed of 40 mph. They are the second fastest land creature on earth, and not reliable on the recall. For this reason, people should not walk a Greyhound on a retractable leash. By the time a Greyhound reaches his top speed at 25 feet away from you, he can easily yank the handle out of your hand and run across town, all the while afraid of the thing bouncing along behind him. Also, never, ever tie a Greyhound to a pole. He might try to take off and break his own neck. A Greyhound parent must pay close attention to the conditions outside, because Greyhounds are temperature sensitive and can easily get too cold or too hot. While they are eager to please the ones they love, they still have the independent spirit of a hound, and need patient and consistent obedience training. They are usually quick to housetrain. They are sociable with people and with other dogs, and many Greyhounds do well with cats. To be safe, do not let your Greyhound and cat outside to "play" together, as the Greyhound's chase instinct may kick in. Greyhounds are tolerant of children and do very well with them. The Greyhounds are sensitive and children need to be polite, or the Greyhound will try to get away from them. A Greyhound will want to be with you as much as possible, and won't want to be left alone for long periods of time. They absolutely thrive on being the center of your attention. Greyhounds, particularly rescued Greyhounds, attach to their owners in a unique and powerful way. They do not however, make very good watchdogs, as they are very quiet and rarely bark, unless they are playing, or chatting it up with other Greyhounds.
Todd - again, black is true, red is untrue about Todd.
Quote:
The Greyhound, the fastest couch potato in the world, is a sweet, gentle, affectionate, adaptable, docile, loyal, intelligent, and loving creature. Yes, they are athletic, and yes, they are fast, but they don't necessarily want to use it. They are prone to short bursts of energy followed by long naps. In fact, they often like to sleep most of the day away. They are mellow and laidback and make excellent house pets. They have a moderate need for exercise, and a couple of short walks per day should meet their needs, unless it is raining, in which case they will be happy to take the day off. They must be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area at all times, because if a Greyhound gets away from you, you might never see him again. He can spot a squirrel a half mile away and take off, quickly reaching a speed of 40 mph. They are the second fastest land creature on earth, and not reliable on the recall. For this reason, people should not walk a Greyhound on a retractable leash. By the time a Greyhound reaches his top speed at 25 feet away from you, he can easily yank the handle out of your hand and run across town, all the while afraid of the thing bouncing along behind him. Also, never, ever tie a Greyhound to a pole. He might try to take off and break his own neck. A Greyhound parent must pay close attention to the conditions outside, because Greyhounds are temperature sensitive and can easily get too cold or too hot. While they are eager to please the ones they love, they still have the independent spirit of a hound, and need patient and consistent obedience training. They are usually quick to housetrain. They are sociable with people and with other dogs, and many Greyhounds do well with cats. To be safe, do not let your Greyhound and cat outside to "play" together, as the Greyhound's chase instinct may kick in. Greyhounds are tolerant of children and do very well with them. The Greyhounds are sensitive and children need to be polite, or the Greyhound will try to get away from them. A Greyhound will want to be with you as much as possible, and won't want to be left alone for long periods of time. They absolutely thrive on being the center of your attention. Greyhounds, particularly rescued Greyhounds, attach to their owners in a unique and powerful way. They do not however, make very good watchdogs, as they are very quiet and rarely bark, unless they are playing, or chatting it up with other Greyhounds.
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  #29  
Old 12-26-2011, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Temperament of a maltese under AKC maltese breed standard:
For all his diminutive size, the Maltese seems to be without fear. His trust and affectionate responsiveness are very appealing. He is among the gentlest mannered of all little dogs, yet he is lively and playful as well as vigorous(Strong, energetic, and active in mind or body). Maltese are very fast learners if they feel sufficiently rewarded.
More info here: American Kennel Club - Maltese

My malts, specifically Snowy, fit the above description, especially the underlined words.

Crystal is the more laid back sort of malt while Snowy is the extreme active one.
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Old 12-26-2011, 11:36 AM
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Every maltese I hve met has been incredible. I am not a small dog person, but if I ever did ^^^^^^ would be what I would choose. Love the description.

I am glad about what I read concerning greyhounds and retractable leashes. Good that was in there.
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