Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Breeding Ground


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:01 PM
cliffdog's Avatar
cliffdog cliffdog is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: LA (Lower Alabama)
Posts: 349
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran101 View Post
*shrug* that's fine, and breeders/owners have every right to do what they think is right as long as the dogs/pups are well cared for

the point I was trying to make is that I DON'T feel that way.. so I probably wouldn't choose a breeder who did.

To me, dogs and puppies will always be loved pets, parts of the family, bed warmers, jogging partners.. etc.. that kind of thing lol
They might have a purpose other than that, but being companions is their main purpose
so I usually try to support a breeder who agrees with that state of mind
Understood We had a mini poodle when I was growing up who only ever went outside to bathroom. She wouldn't have been a good kennel dog and I would probably not buy a pet dog from a kennel breeder.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:15 PM
sillysally's Avatar
sillysally sillysally is offline
Obey the Toad.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: A hole in the bottom of the sea.
Posts: 4,897
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linds View Post
Ok, so I am down with people buying from whatever breeder they want so don't take this as an attack as it's not meant that way. But I honestly am curious about this.

If the puppies that are coming out of the breeder aren't phased in the least by being brought into the home after being raised in kennels outside why does it matter? If they aren't afraid of things, bomb proof, stable dogs then why does if they are socialized in the homes make any difference?
My dogs will always be housedogs, companions and family members first, all performance things I may do with the dog is just icing on the cake. I believe that both stability and socialization are essential for a pup and therefore I want my pup to be in the house, with the family, experiencing home life from the day they pop out into the world. Just call it stacking the deck.
__________________

~Christina--Mom to:
Sally--8 yr old pit bull mix
Jack--6 yr old Labrador
Sadie & Runt--12 yr old calico DSHs
Pickles & Kiwi--3 yr old white winged parakeets
Yoda--1 yr old Quaker parrot
Solo--12 yr old Senegal parrot
Sheena--Quarter Horse--3/24/86-6/23/11--Rest Easy Sweet Girl~




Labs do it in the lake.


Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:21 PM
sillysally's Avatar
sillysally sillysally is offline
Obey the Toad.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: A hole in the bottom of the sea.
Posts: 4,897
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffdog View Post
Well that's rather how it is, to me, lol. Around my place, dogs are very well-loved and cared for livestock. Animals there for a working purpose.
For me, horses fall into the category of well loved livestock (although Sheena was with me years after she was retired from riding), but if I were buying a young horse from a breeder I would have much the same standards. Obviously the horse isn't going to be living in a house, but I would still want the colt exposed to as many aspects of typical horse life as possible when I picked it up.....
__________________

~Christina--Mom to:
Sally--8 yr old pit bull mix
Jack--6 yr old Labrador
Sadie & Runt--12 yr old calico DSHs
Pickles & Kiwi--3 yr old white winged parakeets
Yoda--1 yr old Quaker parrot
Solo--12 yr old Senegal parrot
Sheena--Quarter Horse--3/24/86-6/23/11--Rest Easy Sweet Girl~




Labs do it in the lake.


Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:35 PM
Linds's Avatar
Linds Linds is offline
Twin 2
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,477
Default

I guess it more that for the dogs I am drawn to I like that they turn out just as stable without fear of things that they haven't been exposed to. I like that they don't need to be around vacuums to still handle them like it's old news when they do or know that a slick floor isn't any different than the grass or dirt they grew up on. I like that this is what they are without being socialized extensively or exposed to much other than the ranch they grew up on but still manage to take on new things like it's nothing.

That's kinda why I almost put it in a plus category rather than a negative (depending on how it's done of course). I don't go looking for a breeder that uses kennels, I just tend to be drawn to that type of breeder. But that's why there is different types of chocolate!

But the biggest positive is that you then get to taunt your breeder with pictures of your dog snuggled up on a pillow under the covers while he shakes his head at you
__________________
The Kooligans
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:39 PM
MyHorseMyRules
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I get the argument that you simply aren't comfortable with pups being raised in a kennel. Do I feel the same? No. But like Linds said, that's why there are different kinds of chocolate.

The only part I'm struggling with is the belief that they need to be raised indoors for them to be properly socialized. I mean, that's kind of the point of my comment about a solid, stable dog. A puppy doesn't have to experience EVERYTHING. Honestly, it's impossible. You can get pretty darn close if you try really, really hard and spend a lot of time and effort on it. But, IMO, it's not necessary. The key is simply teaching a dog how to react when experiencing something new. ETA: And it sure helps if the dogs being produced are stable dogs that are more likely to handle situations like that on their own.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 11-21-2011, 06:52 PM
cliffdog's Avatar
cliffdog cliffdog is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: LA (Lower Alabama)
Posts: 349
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sillysally View Post
For me, horses fall into the category of well loved livestock (although Sheena was with me years after she was retired from riding), but if I were buying a young horse from a breeder I would have much the same standards. Obviously the horse isn't going to be living in a house, but I would still want the colt exposed to as many aspects of typical horse life as possible when I picked it up.....
How you feel about horses is exactly how I feel about dogs. They should be exposed to all sorts of things and socialized. I don't think they need to be raised in the house for that. At least not for me, because they won't be living indoors when they get to my house anyways.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:19 PM
Lizmo's Avatar
Lizmo Lizmo is offline
Water Junkie
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: AL
Posts: 17,300
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyHorseMyRules View Post

The only part I'm struggling with is the belief that they need to be raised indoors for them to be properly socialized. I mean, that's kind of the point of my comment about a solid, stable dog. A puppy doesn't have to experience EVERYTHING. Honestly, it's impossible. You can get pretty darn close if you try really, really hard and spend a lot of time and effort on it. But, IMO, it's not necessary. The key is simply teaching a dog how to react when experiencing something new. ETA: And it sure helps if the dogs being produced are stable dogs that are more likely to handle situations like that on their own.
^this is way better than what I could have written, so I'll just quote you.

Also, just a little thing, dogs that are raised in a kennel (say, born in the house, moved out to the kennel with mom at 3 weeks old) are still going to be around a huge amount of stimuli. Other dogs, barking, feeding times, let out to play in the yard with mom, let out to play by themselves, vaccinated, dogs being moved, crates shutting, doors closing, all the outdoor sounds, rain, thunder, snow, wind, grass, steps, being held, people coming and going, and so much more.
__________________

l ~Jennifer~ l
l Handler for Team Blazin' l Photographer at Joy Photography l Nikon D40X with 35mm 1.8 Nikkor Lens l
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:41 PM
*blackrose's Avatar
*blackrose *blackrose is offline
"I'm kupo for kupo nuts!"
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 5,199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyHorseMyRules View Post
The only part I'm struggling with is the belief that they need to be raised indoors for them to be properly socialized. I mean, that's kind of the point of my comment about a solid, stable dog. A puppy doesn't have to experience EVERYTHING. Honestly, it's impossible. You can get pretty darn close if you try really, really hard and spend a lot of time and effort on it. But, IMO, it's not necessary. The key is simply teaching a dog how to react when experiencing something new. ETA: And it sure helps if the dogs being produced are stable dogs that are more likely to handle situations like that on their own.
Exactly how I feel.

Yes, I would prefer a breeder who raises the pups in the house...but I wouldn't turn down a breed whose pups are raised in a kennel, as long as the dogs (and earlier produced pups) are stable and well socialized.
__________________
Abrams, Momma's Boy Chesapeake Bay Retriever and Cynder, Daddy's Girl muttly
~*~ DOB 4/11/13 ~*~ DOB 1/28/2006 ~*~

Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:51 PM
sillysally's Avatar
sillysally sillysally is offline
Obey the Toad.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: A hole in the bottom of the sea.
Posts: 4,897
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyHorseMyRules View Post
I get the argument that you simply aren't comfortable with pups being raised in a kennel. Do I feel the same? No. But like Linds said, that's why there are different kinds of chocolate.

The only part I'm struggling with is the belief that they need to be raised indoors for them to be properly socialized. I mean, that's kind of the point of my comment about a solid, stable dog. A puppy doesn't have to experience EVERYTHING. Honestly, it's impossible. You can get pretty darn close if you try really, really hard and spend a lot of time and effort on it. But, IMO, it's not necessary. The key is simply teaching a dog how to react when experiencing something new. ETA: And it sure helps if the dogs being produced are stable dogs that are more likely to handle situations like that on their own.
Well, a dog doesn't NEED to be from a breeder to be a great performance dog, but it's about stacking the deck, no?

If I intend to have a pup living indoors, I don't understand the benefit of having it raised outdoors.
__________________

~Christina--Mom to:
Sally--8 yr old pit bull mix
Jack--6 yr old Labrador
Sadie & Runt--12 yr old calico DSHs
Pickles & Kiwi--3 yr old white winged parakeets
Yoda--1 yr old Quaker parrot
Solo--12 yr old Senegal parrot
Sheena--Quarter Horse--3/24/86-6/23/11--Rest Easy Sweet Girl~




Labs do it in the lake.


Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:54 PM
SpringerLover's Avatar
SpringerLover SpringerLover is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: B-ville
Posts: 2,832
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sillysally View Post
If I intend to have a pup living indoors, I don't understand the benefit of having it raised outdoors.
That's pretty much how I feel, too. I can't imagine my dogs living in a kennel situation!
__________________
sigg
Bailey VCD1 RE NAC NJC NCC TN-N CGC
Gabby
ARCH URO1 UCD Buzz NAC NCC S-NJC O-TN-N TG-N WV-N RL2 RLVX RN ThD CGC
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site