Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dog Health Care


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-06-2011, 01:18 PM
Ivy's Avatar
Ivy Ivy is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,713
Default Malnurished Dog

Not sure yet if she's malnourished or emaciated.

What are the best steps to take when caring for a malnourished/emaciated dog? What should I look out for?

I read that feeding a bland diet would be best in the beginning then read somewhere else to feed puppy food (higher fat)

So much contradicting information. Has anyone ever dealt with this? Pointers & advice?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-07-2011, 12:06 AM
GlassOnion's Avatar
GlassOnion GlassOnion is offline
Thanks, and Gig 'em.
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Tejas
Posts: 9,065
Default

Bland diet is the way to go. If they've been starved for a long time, their system probably can't handle the 'richer' foods.
__________________
Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, throughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming --- 'WOW, WHAT A RIDE!!!!' " - Author Unknown
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-07-2011, 12:59 AM
thehoundgirl's Avatar
thehoundgirl thehoundgirl is offline
APBT crazy!
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Beautiful Northwest
Posts: 2,132
Default

You can also try making Satin balls. Just make sure you feed the dog small meals at first so they don't bloat.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-07-2011, 01:31 AM
Teal Teal is offline
...ice road...
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,497
Default

Whatever you decide to feed - feed small portions throughout the day and don't rush to put weight back on.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-07-2011, 07:51 AM
Ivy's Avatar
Ivy Ivy is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,713
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlassOnion View Post
Bland diet is the way to go. If they've been starved for a long time, their system probably can't handle the 'richer' foods.
What would be considered a 'richer' food? Something like Orijen you mean?
How about feeding raw? I know that when a dog is on the raw diet, growth is slow but steady. Starting with chicken, pretty bland. No huge growth spurts as compared to a kibble diet.
Or what kibble is recommended? Grain free i'm going to assume, but what percentage of protein, phosphorous/calcium is best in order to avoid too much of a shock.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-07-2011, 09:11 AM
AdrianneIsabel's Avatar
AdrianneIsabel AdrianneIsabel is offline
Glutton for Crazy
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 8,893
Default


Untitled by AdrianneIsabel, on Flickr

This girl started out looking like this

Meeting Tucker by AdrianneIsabel, on Flickr

I used raw meat and Nutrical. These two photos are about 1-2 weeks apart. Honestly don't stress too much, it's not hard to fatten up a dog, even a malnourished one. Just start slowly, be ready for a few pukes, make sure the dog is healthy and has been dewormed and keep around a lot of water.

Good luck!!
__________________
Sloan von Krigbaum IPO1 CGC BH CD NA NJ PD MJ-N RATI RATN 3/7/10 -
Shamoo NJ-N RATI RATN 3/1/98 -
Phelan du Loups du Soleil CGC RATI 6/15/13 -
Chili Brigades Brover 5/23/14 -

Arnold CGC TDI FD 6/29/04 - 07/05/13
Backup CGC HIC CD SRD SJ-N RATI 12/29/09 - 07/05/13

You were amazing, we did amazing things.


Harmony Canine, relationship based training.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-07-2011, 04:30 PM
GlassOnion's Avatar
GlassOnion GlassOnion is offline
Thanks, and Gig 'em.
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Tejas
Posts: 9,065
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
What would be considered a 'richer' food? Something like Orijen you mean?
How about feeding raw? I know that when a dog is on the raw diet, growth is slow but steady. Starting with chicken, pretty bland. No huge growth spurts as compared to a kibble diet.
Or what kibble is recommended? Grain free i'm going to assume, but what percentage of protein, phosphorous/calcium is best in order to avoid too much of a shock.
i/d is about as bland as you can get. Its guaranteed analysis is here.

Doesn't really matter if it's grain free or not. It's a bit harder to digest, as far as an emaciated dog goes, so you might want it without, but it's not going to cause any big problems if you can't find one without.
__________________
Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, throughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming --- 'WOW, WHAT A RIDE!!!!' " - Author Unknown
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-07-2011, 04:42 PM
Dekka's Avatar
Dekka Dekka is offline
Just try me..
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 19,335
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlassOnion View Post
i/d is about as bland as you can get. Its guaranteed analysis is here.

Doesn't really matter if it's grain free or not. It's a bit harder to digest, as far as an emaciated dog goes, so you might want it without, but it's not going to cause any big problems if you can't find one without.
it might be bland, but I am not sure how its easier to digest
Quote:
Whole Grain Corn, Brewers Rice, Dried Egg Product, Chicken By-Product Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Powdered Cellulose
Who grain corn is not known for its ease of digestion. Rice ok.. dried egg product (no idea what that is) Chicken by products.. that has so much variety (ie could contain non denatured drugs and other things in your typical 4D meat.. not what I would say is easy on the digestion)

It might be easier to digest than other SD foods, but I can't see logically how that food would be easier to digest than a food made of chicken and rice. (I can see not loading up on fats, fats are hard when starved)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-08-2011, 12:08 AM
GlassOnion's Avatar
GlassOnion GlassOnion is offline
Thanks, and Gig 'em.
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Tejas
Posts: 9,065
Default

Quote:
Chicken by products.. that has so much variety (ie could contain non denatured drugs and other things in your typical 4D meat.. not what I would say is easy on the digestion)
No more than regular meat would contain, and the same chicken muscle has as much chance of being from a '4D'/drug residue animal as byproducts do. Your stomach, even in a previously starved dog, does a good job of denaturing proteins, it's what it does.

Protein sources won't matter too much as primary energy sources in starvation are carbohydrates and fat. In a cat, sure. In a dog, not so much.

Whole grain corn may be more difficult to digest than just corn starch on its own, but I've not seen anything to indicate that it's significantly harder to do so. If you have something that says otherwise, please share.

Most people I've seen claim this do so because it has higher fiber content (and thus produces a larger stool) and that's mistakenly thought as "oh this dog isn't digesting this as well", which is true for the insoluble fibers (hence it going out into the stool), but not the stuff inside the corn itself. It's already been processed, so it's not like you're just giving them whole kernels of the stuff. You can even look it up on that DogFoodProject site I see people cite a lot.
Quote:
Corn often gets an undeserved bad reputation. While it is not acceptable as a main source of protein in a dog food (as it is used in combination with corn gluten), as a source of carbohydrates it is no better and no worse than other grains in terms of nutritional value and digestibility. The starch part of corn is highly digestible but the whole ground product has a higher fiber content than other grains (around 7%), which results in slightly larger stools - often incorrectly interpreted as lack of digestibility. Unless an individual dog is intolerant or allergic to corn, there is no need to avoid products which include it in reasonable amounts.
But if you don't like a specific ingredient, then find a food that doesn't have that one; there's plenty of different brands and formulations out there.


Also dried egg product is defined as:
Quote:
Dried, whole, cooked eggs (minus shells) are often added to pet foods to increase the protein biological value. Raw egg whites contain avidin which binds to biotin (B Vitamin) to make it unavailable to the pet.
It's just another protein source.

Additionally, though 'highly digestible' (of which i/d is one) is not a protected/regulated term, it's traditionally been reserved for meals that have protein, carbohydrate, and fat digestibilities of >85%. That percentage will vary in a previously emaciated dog, but so will others.

Some will say I'm plugging i/d: I'm not. I don't care what she feeds her dog as long as it works. But i/d is a good comparison if you're looking for a similar food. And from my experience, it works very well in handling animals with GI problems, including starvation.
__________________
Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, throughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming --- 'WOW, WHAT A RIDE!!!!' " - Author Unknown
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-08-2011, 03:36 AM
Romy's Avatar
Romy Romy is offline
Taxiderpy
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 9,972
Default

Why is the dog emaciated in the first place?

If a dog is underweight because it was stray and not able to find enough food, I'd choose to handle it differently than a dog who has food allergies, or just recovered from parvo, or has a huge parasite load, etc.

For the lack of food scenario I'd probably just go straight with puppy kibble or raw, depending on what you're comfortable feeding. Satin balls are excellent for weight gain. So are extra carbs like a bowl of buttered pasta or oatmeal at some point during the day.

For anything else I'd approach with caution. If it's a result of digestive upset, then you don't want to feed something that will keep irritating the digestive tract.

When we got fosters in Tucson we put them on boiled rice and chicken for a couple days, just because they were all stressed and having diarrhea from the combo of being in a shelter environment and the eating shelter food. After that it was a decent quality kibble (usually something from the diamond naturals line) with a little extra, like a chopped boiled egg or something. They all went from pretty underweight back up to a healthy weight fairly quickly.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:43 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site