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Old 05-04-2011, 01:46 PM
Doggie07 Doggie07 is offline
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Default I want another Siberian husky

I want another siberian husky, I really loved Lucy and the type of dog she was. I am just wondering, do I need to leave this place when I do get one? I don't want to be flogged by the people who disagree.
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Old 05-04-2011, 02:05 PM
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What do you mean by you 'loved the type of dog she was'?

What part of owning a husky appeals to you because if I recall correctly it didn't go very well the first time? What would you do to make things different THIS time?

I think that is the most important question to ask yourself. And you need to be honest with what you can and cannot handle. Sometimes the breeds from our past are not the breeds we need now, regardless of how much we loved our past dogs.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
What do you mean by you 'loved the type of dog she was'?

What part of owning a husky appeals to you because if I recall correctly it didn't go very well the first time? What would you do to make things different THIS time?

I think that is the most important question to ask yourself. And you need to be honest with what you can and cannot handle. Sometimes the breeds from our past are not the breeds we need now, regardless of how much we loved our past dogs.
It was going well the first time. Why I rehomed her had nothing to do with her.

Actually, I could have kept her, but I wanted her to be happy so I let someone who could bring her inside their home get her.

What would I do different this time? Well, when I do get a husky, a long time from now, it'll be an inside dog. That is the major and biggest difference.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:40 PM
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I would assume the problem was you. Almost always the owner failed the dog, not the other way around.

Sit down, think about how you can change yourself and your priorities and commitments to ensure you won't fail another dog.

Dogs can be perfectly happy outside and miserable inside, its not where a dog lives its about the quality of interactions it obtains from its family.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:42 PM
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Didn't you live in Florida? And rehome her because your parents wouldn't allow a dog in the house?

I think if you remain somewhere with a hotter climate, you can have a husky if you're willing to make a lot of adjustments. It's a decision you really wouldn't be able to make unless you're living in a stable place somewhere, and know both where you are and your schedule. Huskies need a lot of exercise. So even if you can keep her indoors in air conditioning most of the day, will you have the time and space to give her most of her exercising during the cooler hours? Even if it means getting up at 5 am before the sun to walk her or run around with her? And so on.

A husky isn't an easy dog, and having a puppy for a few weeks or months is not going to give you a good idea of the hardships that will come from owning one. However, as with any breed, if you meet enough of them and know what they're like, and decide you absolutely should have one in your life, and you're willing to make adjustments and give things up for the dog, there is a good chance it could work out.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:56 PM
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I couldn't remember why she was rehomed. But I do agree having a puppy for a short amount of time doesn't tell you much about the breed or if they're a good fit for you truly. Puppies are all pretty much similar when they're really young.

If I were you, I'd sit down and start thinking about what you want and expect in a dog. Be completely honest with yourself about it too. It may or may not be a husky that is right for you now. I LOVED my german shepherd but I have come to face the realization that I probably will not have another, at least not now. Different stages of life and I have different needs and wants in a dog now.

You never did answer with what part of owning a husky in particular appeals to you. I think that's important to think about too. Why a husky in particular? What specifically about huskies is it that you want?

Also, even though there definitely are breed trends, I would not get a husky expecting it to be the same 'type' of dog as Lucy. I've had seven papillons and while they do share some breed characteristics, they're all individuals. Rose and Mia in particular are close to polar opposites. If I got Mia expecting her to be just like Rose, I'd be very disappointed.
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Old 05-04-2011, 08:04 PM
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There is no lack of need for fosters in Husky rescue. Maybe you could volunteer to see if a husky is really a good idea for you?
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Old 05-04-2011, 08:24 PM
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Sort of reminds me about weighing the wants and needs in economics. lol

If you really want to, then you'd do anything to safeguard that decision of having one.
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doggie07 View Post
I want another siberian husky, I really loved Lucy and the type of dog she was. I am just wondering, do I need to leave this place when I do get one? I don't want to be flogged by the people who disagree.
I'm probably going to be flamed for being harsh, but I think you need to hear it.

If you live in a subtropical climate and you can only have outside dogs, a husky is not the breed for you. Don't get another one, it would just be the same situation all over again, except this time your heart might win out, and instead of being fair to the dog and re-homing it to a suitable owner, you might keep the husky in awful living conditions.
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:14 PM
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I don't think that is unreasonable Noly. Its an arctic breed. If the OP can't look after the dog then no they shouldn't get one. If things have changed and now the dog can come into a cool house, then sure.
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