Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Breeding Ground


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 03-17-2011, 08:51 PM
sassafras's Avatar
sassafras sassafras is offline
such sights to show you
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 5,642
Default

Believe it or not, Maisy is like this. Drives me nuts, and no one really quite understands how frustrating it is unless they have a dog like this, too. Especially up here in the land of labradors. So yea, if it's something that can be bred for I'm all for it!

A couple of times she's gotten too thin for my comfort skipping meals, I gave up and started mixing canned food in with her dry long ago. She still skips a couple of meals a week, but I seem to have found a dry she likes better and her weight has been pretty stable for a while now. Silly girl.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-17-2011, 09:38 PM
lizzybeth727's Avatar
lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 6,403
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michiyo-Fir View Post
Picky eating habits is so big in the Pap breed and I'm wondering if it could be counted as a very mild health issue.
This is exactly what I was thinking. Especially in dogs that starve themselves to the point of dangerous health problems, I tend to wonder if there are other health problems that are just much harder to identify....
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:01 PM
Kat09Tails's Avatar
Kat09Tails Kat09Tails is offline
*Now with Snark*
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Upper Left hand corner, USA
Posts: 3,337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michiyo-Fir View Post
I remember that Laurelin said that some of the lines produce Paps that appear to eat quite well and that one of Mia's parents eats well and she does too. That's what made me bring it up.

Picky eating habits is so big in the Pap breed and I'm wondering if it could be counted as a very mild health issue.
Well some are easier keepers than others that's for sure. My girls eat anything, my boys tend to be the picky ones. I like to think I've gotten a little better about getting them to eat as well with less stress on all of us. Honestly now I just put down the dishes for most of them and walk away.

Things got better when I went to raw, when I calmed down about letting them eat at their own pace, and when I made it a bit more of a social activity for them.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:05 PM
Michiyo-Fir Michiyo-Fir is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,353
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat09Tails View Post
Things got better when I went to raw, when I calmed down about letting them eat at their own pace, and when I made it a bit more of a social activity for them.
In our house, things were the absolute worst with raw. Starting raw, you're supposed to use the same protein for a while so we chose chicken like most people. After 3 days of eating chicken, she just absolutely refused to eat it again. 48 hrs, she ate one meal of chicken (actually half a meal's worth because I fed 2 times a day) went another 36 hrs and ate another half a meal's worth. So during that time in a total of 3.5 to 4 days she only ate one actual day's worth of food.

In the end I just went back to kibble because I can't leave raw meat lying there for her to eat whenever she wants.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:23 PM
UniquityBelgians UniquityBelgians is offline
Big Dog
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 164
Default

Belgians are known to be anorexic at times. I've just learned to embrace it (hey, it's easier on the budget). No, but seriously -- I have gotten the odd young dog that just never wants to eat. Visa was terrible for this, for her first 5 years of age she was 32 lbs, which is 16 lbs underweight for her. After I bred her she suddenly started to eat and keeps weight on easily now. Of all of her pups, only one was the same way. But even when they eat regularily, my dogs have such a high metabolism, they are still on the lean side, which I'm definatly ok with. They say that underweight dogs live a great deal longer than normal or overweight dogs. They are alot less likely to get cancer too. So if my dogs want to be skinny, I'll let them. The only time I'll bribe them and try to fatten them up is when they're entered in a show. Otherwise they can be as anorexic as they want to be. I guess with my dogs, they have so much coat that people can't really tell when they're thin. I'd get some pretty nasty looks when people would feel Visa and Solo (her RB son) when they were skinny -- and at that time, I worked SO hard to put weight on them, tried to find the highest fat/calorie foods and treats. People thought I was starving them. I don't have that problem anymore, but even if I did, I really don't care what people think anymore. If my dogs are light eaters, they're light eaters.
__________________
~Jordan and the Uniquity Belgians
www.uniquitybelgianshepherds.com
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:46 PM
Michiyo-Fir Michiyo-Fir is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,353
Default

The problem is sometimes it's a health issue.

I think I remember puppydog's Riley collapsing from not eating for so long. I've heard of a lot of people's small dogs becoming hypoglycemia from lack of food or just plain old refusing.

I don't bribe Nia to eat these days either. She can eat when she wants and I know she won't starve to death but sometimes it's hard to see her being so hungry (stomach growling) and looking so thin but still refusing her food. Unless she hasn't eaten for more than 48 hrs, I let her eat at her own pace and she's pretty much fine with it.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:54 PM
sassafras's Avatar
sassafras sassafras is offline
such sights to show you
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 5,642
Default

I just can't have an underweight, short-haired dog here in the winter. She'd freeze her hiney off just going out to pee.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-17-2011, 10:57 PM
Xandra's Avatar
Xandra Xandra is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,792
Default

I think general robustness should be a breeding criterion. Dogs should eat well, have a good immune system and natural birthing is a huge plus...
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-17-2011, 11:29 PM
Kat09Tails's Avatar
Kat09Tails Kat09Tails is offline
*Now with Snark*
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Upper Left hand corner, USA
Posts: 3,337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xandra View Post
I think general robustness should be a breeding criterion. Dogs should eat well, have a good immune system and natural birthing is a huge plus...
I'll remember that when I'm selecting (if I'm lucky) my next breeding dog at 8 weeks old from a litter of 3.

In all seriousness I select the best I can from what I'm offered, turn those down most of the time, and wait.... wait... negotiate ... wait... wait... wait some more. I raise the dog, rub a little prayer stone that their bite comes in correctly as an adult, pray again that ofa and cerf tests come back ok, wait for the dog to grow up to see what they really look like and if they meet my standards for a papillon, wait until 2 years old and then try to find a match to compliment my dog where the stud's owner doesn't have a crazy contract.

While I would love to be as picky as must eat like a lab frankly it's hard enough to get a dog that looks balanced as an adult, has a decent temperament, and is meeting written standard as well as my standard without selling a kidney to not have to co own the dog with four other people.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-17-2011, 11:35 PM
Michiyo-Fir Michiyo-Fir is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,353
Default

I don't agree.

I think eating well should be part of being healthy just like OFA tests and CERF tests. Would you breed a dog that came back OFA borderline for hips just because you couldn't tell at 8 weeks old and waited and waited and waited to see if they had a correct temperament, bite, coat, head, etc. etc?

Waiting a long time is not an excuse for neglecting certain other qualities. Again, I'm not saying that you are neglecting health but it's just my personal opinion that dogs with really really poor appetites that have to be enticed to eat all the time or else loses a lot of weight shouldn't be bred if that means it could be passed down to the puppies.

I'm just saying if I were breeding, I wouldn't breed a dog that has an especially poor appetite like Nia. She wouldn't qualify in my own standards even if she turned out great in every other aspect. I would properly breed a dog that at least has a moderate appetite.

Of course, I'm not a breeder and finding quality dogs may be much harder than I know from watching shows and talking with breeders but I have my own opinions on the matter. My opinions may change if and when I actually get into breeding my own dogs (I don't think I will) but for now, they are set on eating at least moderately well as a criteria for myself.

Edit: I remember some people were talking about their Chi breeders valuing natural whelping. That is an important factor to me as well and I love that they take that into account. Just because a dog turns out perfectly but has difficulties giving birth doesn't mean they should continue to be bred and pass it on to their offspring.
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:59 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site