Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dogs - General Dog Chat


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:19 AM
Fran101's Avatar
Fran101 Fran101 is offline
Resident fainting goat
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 12,505
Default Raising from puppyhood..

I was just wondering..

I'm one of those people that has NEVER had/raised puppies. Always adult already trained dogs.

at first,I wanted my next dog to be a puppy just because its something I've never done before and puppies are so cute!

and then I started thinking about it and I'm not sure.. I don't like messes.. potty training seems like a real bitch.. I don't really know how to train a puppy, and the idea of a puppy chewing on my personal belongings makes me cringe. and oh my god potty training.

Oh and next time around I'm doing the rescue route. so getting a puppy would really be a coin toss because id probably be getting a mixed dog and I have pretty specific ideas about what I want for size/temperament.

Anywhoo..

For those who have raised puppies to adulthood..

Do you think its worth it?
Would you have it any other way?
why/why not?
Pros/Cons

Do you think its something everyone should experience? '

Do you think training/socialization from puppyhood always creates a steady sound well behaved dog?
__________________

Disclaimer: I work for Trupanion and love it/our policy! But I do not speak for the company or as the company.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:29 AM
stardogs stardogs is online now
Behavior Nerd
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 4,630
Default

I've never had a dog of mine any earlier than 4 mo and I like it that way - housetraining is way easier, though they still are pretty much like a toddler and you'll still need to puppy proof your house. Personally, I looove early adolescence (5mo to about 7 or 8 mo), but many of my clients hate it because the dog is still very much a baby. 7-10 months is the span I refer to as the alien brain abduction phase - their retention and attention span is greatly decreased and they sometimes seem to forget things they knew before - very exasperating for many. There's a reason that most dogs enter a shelter between 6 and 18 months of age.

For some people adult dogs will always be the way to go and there's nothing wrong with that. Honestly in your area, adult dogs are more in need of homes than puppies, so you actually might have more of a selection if you wanted an adult.

Of course puppies are insanely cute to make up for their mischievousness and you can often mold them to your needs a bit better (though taking your time to find the right adult can have the same benefits in terms of fitting into your life), both big plusses for many. I like young adolescents because they are little learning sponges without being too short on attention or coordination.
__________________
Erin, Ziva, Kestrel, Aerten, and Snipe
Always in our hearts: The Amazing Maggie Mae


Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:33 AM
Laurelin's Avatar
Laurelin Laurelin is offline
I'm All Ears
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 29,940
Default

I've done both multiple times- 3 dogs came to us as adults and then the rest have been puppies. I don't think either is 'better' and neither guarantees a completely stable/easy dog.

Quote:
Do you think its worth it?
Yes, but on the other hand it has also been worth missing out on the puppyhoods of the other dogs we've had too. I think all my dogs have been worth it, no matter how I came about getting them. I did not get my heart dog until she was 4 years old. She's just perfect and I have absolutely bonded with her as much as I would have if I got her as a puppy.

Quote:
Would you have it any other way?
Yes, I would definitely adopt or buy an adult dog in the future too. It depends.

Quote:
why/why not?
Because you can find awesome adult dogs in shelters or retired breeders or grown out dogs. I am sure I will get more adult dogs in the future but I definitely want more puppies too.

Quote:
Pros/Cons
Depends. with a puppy, even if you really research the breed and the lines, you don't know what you have. With an adult you know more of what the final product is. on the other hand, being able to start a dog out right is a good thing too. And yes, puppies are freaking adorable and lots of fun. I loved having puppy Mia and I miss it some days. On the other hand, they make messes, they scream and cry, the chew EVERYTHING. Each one is a separate challenge. Mia was a ton of work as a puppy- no off switch, everything in the mouth, she screamed a lot, she peed on the floor a lot, etc. It took up pretty much all my spare time to raise her. Mia was pretty much puppy from hell for a while. She's still a ton of work at 18 months now, much much more than Summer was when I got her.

Of my others... Nard was a hard puppy but a wonderful adolescent and adult. Beau was an easy puppy all around but he had a ton of energy up until about 4 years. Nikki was pretty good minus the chewing the wallpaper thing. Of our 3 adults, Trey was a hard one to fit in but the other two fit right in pretty much immediately.

Quote:
Do you think its something everyone should experience?
No, I think a lot of people would much rather skip it to be honest.

Quote:
Do you think training/socialization from puppyhood always creates a steady sound well behaved dog?
No. I think it helps but the temperament has to be there first. Some dogs can't overcome this. Trey was socialized pretty much as much as possible by his breeder (taken all over to trials and such) and he was very unstable. I think it's a definite positive thing though to make those good experiences and lay foundation work, but it's never a guarantee.
__________________
Mia CGC - (5 year old Papillon)
Hank - (approx. 10 month old Spotty Dog)
Summer TG3 TIAD - (10 year old Papillon)

Last edited by Laurelin; 11-10-2010 at 01:13 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:38 AM
MisssAshby's Avatar
MisssAshby MisssAshby is offline
Richy Rich HM Twit!
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Edmond, OK
Posts: 2,978
Default

When I'm considering adding another dog and the source of which I will get the dog a few things go in to play.

-Type of dog (size)
-Temperament of said dog (what it ideally should be/could be)
-Health issues of the breed I'm wanting.

If I'm looking for a breed that is known to have a strong temperament and/or health issues I will not get a dog from the shelter/rescue. I will purchase from a reputable breeder as a puppy. To me it's extremely important that I know the background of a dog who is capable of being powerful, etc. Some people are experienced enough to handle these kind of dogs from a rescue/shelter but most aren't. Dogs I'm referring to would be something like Filas, Mastiffs, Rottweilers, etc.

If it's a smaller "family" type breed/dog I don't really see anything wrong with getting a rescue as a puppy or adult - it all depends upon what you are after.

Personally, for me I will probably always have puppies as I think it's worth the extra time. I currently own both (breeder and shelter/rescue) and can see the pros/cons of both. However, with that said I DO NOT think everyone should experience owing a puppy -- some are cut out for it some are not -- simple as that.

Potty training isn't that bad

ETA: I forgot to respond about the socialization part - but I agree with what Laur posted.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:46 AM
Laurelin's Avatar
Laurelin Laurelin is offline
I'm All Ears
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 29,940
Default

Yes I agree. There are certain breeds I definitely would want from a breeder too. Keep in mind though that none of the dogs I've gotten as adults have been rescues, they're all breeder dogs whom I knew their entire story before we got them.

Mia is sooo worth her puppyhood and I'd do it again in a heartbeat. I haven't decided on puppy versus adult rescue for the next dog though. The breed I'm looking at could be easy to find a good one either way.
__________________
Mia CGC - (5 year old Papillon)
Hank - (approx. 10 month old Spotty Dog)
Summer TG3 TIAD - (10 year old Papillon)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:52 AM
mrose_s's Avatar
mrose_s mrose_s is offline
BusterLove
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: QLD, Australia
Posts: 12,155
Default

We've always had our dogs from puppyhood, Sophie and Harry were 4 months old when we got them but otherwise they've all been about 8 weeks.
But I hadn't done the hard yards with any of them till Quinn, I knew I wanted a puppy, I wanted the hard work and I got it. The first few weeks were 5 hours of sleep a night, there was always an accident to clean up and now she's just starting to start destroying things. I wouldn't change it though, I wanted a dog I knew the entire story of from the start and that I could raise just how I wanted.

Even my mother has commented that Quinn is a high maintenance puppy though, she's just nuts.

I think I'll have both puppies and adults in future.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-10-2010, 12:54 AM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 9,036
Default

If I never had to raise another puppy from scratch I wouldn't miss it. Max was a puppy when we got him. Yeah, he was cute, but potty training sucks. I do NOT have the energy for potty training a puppy right now, so it was awesome I found an adult dog that was exactly what I want/need.

That being said, it is nice to raise a pup from the start, because you get to mold it the way you want it to be. You do have to be careful, because you can also screw up a dog.

If I were going with a breeder, I'd be more apt to get a puppy just because I know what the parents are like. I know what went on during early puppyhood (I swear I'll never get a dog from a breeder that doesn't do early neurological stimulation again, if I can help it). I know what to expect, at least somewhat. Honestly, if I had the time, space and money, I'd snatch up one of Jordan's puppies in a heartbeat, even if it is a puppy.

If I were to go with a rescue, I'd get an adult dog, no question. That way I know the size, temperament and other things from the get go. I don't have to worry about my rescued pup, raised all the right ways, going psycho later in life just because of poor breeding. Most of the time (not always, though, by any means) you can tell if an adult is psycho, or may become so. A puppy's just a cute little pile of fluff

So in short - I'd get an adult if I were to rescue, and would prefer an adult from a breeder, though I'd consider a puppy from a breeder if it was what I was wanting in a dog.

ETA: It would depend on the breeder whether I'd get an adult from them, too. I know some breeders just let the dogs sit there and age. Logan's breeder apparently socializes the crap out of them and trains them, so they're wonderful, well-adjusted adults instead of wild, untrained adults.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-10-2010, 01:10 AM
JacksonsMom's Avatar
JacksonsMom JacksonsMom is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 8,324
Default

I brought Jackson home when he was 9 weeks old and I wouldn't trade it for the world. I LOVED being able to raise him the way I wanted to, right from the start. I love having somewhat of a 'clean slate' with a puppy and can mold them into what I want them to become. I bonded REALLY close with him during those first few weeks... he's certainly my heart dog through and through.

Was it hard work? Of course. I remember being on a strict schedule. I was 18 and used to staying up super late and sleeping in late, that changed for a bit. I was so exhausted by 9pm that I was ready to go to sleep. So we'd go out for the night, he'd wake me up again around 3am, and then sleep til about 7am, then we'd have our morning play-time and feeding from 7-8, and I'd go back to sleep with him for another hour (was on winter break from college when I got him). I began socializing right away, and training, etc. I would say it was the hardest for the first two months but then he adjusted very well to my schedule. Now, he will sleep in happily with me til 11am on the weekends, etc.

I have considered adopting an older dog next time around just because I'm unsure of the puppyhood thing again. But looking back, I guess it wasn't that hard, and it went by sooo fast. I hardly even remember to be honest. And I keep going back to the fact that I really like to raise a dog from a pup. I don't know why exactly. My stepmom adopted their rescue Buddy and he's a sweetheart of a dog but he's got his issues that did not arise until he became comfortable around us. He hates strangers, he will bark and bark and never shut up, he WILL bite, etc. These are all issues they've been working on training, etc, but it's not really something I WANT to risk. And I know there's a potential to get a puppy with these issues too but I do feel it can lessen some things.

I think I will end up getting a puppy again whenever I add a second dog. There's just something I like about it. But I would never be opposed to the idea of adding an adult dog that is a match for us either.
__________________
Brit & Jackson
~ It's Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas ~

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-10-2010, 01:10 AM
HayleyMarie's Avatar
HayleyMarie HayleyMarie is offline
Like a bat outa' hell
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Beautiful British Columbia!!
Posts: 6,945
Default

Quote:
Do you think its worth it?
Totally 100%. I liked how I was able to socialize Teagan to the extreem and shape her into a dog that I wanted to an extent.


Quote:
Would you have it any other way?
No, I am pretty sure most of my future dogs will be puppies from a fantastic breeder. Until the point when I am ready to rescue an older dog, probably an older pibble.

Quote:
why/why not?
I like knowing that I have a well socialized, confident dog that has seen the world as a puppy and that will be able to take on the world full force as a dog.

Quote:
Pros/Cons
socializing the crap outta a puppy is alot of work, so is the training and waking up at 3 in the morning because the baby needs to go pee. Pros is you get to watch the puppy grow and experiance the world. And hopfully the puppy ends up as a well rounded confident dog.

Quote:
Do you think its something everyone should experience?
no, I think alot of people would not have the patients or have enough tolerence training a puppy


Quote:
Do you think training/socialization from puppyhood always creates a steady sound well behaved dog?
No, it helps ALOT though. Genetics still come into play.
__________________


Teagan Westhighland White Terrier
Panzer South African Boerboel Mastiff
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-10-2010, 01:31 AM
Paul Bright Paul Bright is offline
Big Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 122
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fransheska101 View Post

Do you think its worth it? - yes definitely worth it.
Would you have it any other way? - no
why/why not? - the joy and bond that grows between a puppy and owner until the puppy becomes a dog is stronger. The joy a puppy bring is irreplaceable.
Pros/Cons - pros - innocence, love, different kind of care needed.
cons - more training required, more shots

Do you think its something everyone should experience? - definitely NOT. Only people who are willing to care, who are patient enough to train, and who are loving enough should get a puppy.

Do you think training/socialization from puppyhood always creates a steady sound well behaved dog? -- always is a hard word to tackle with. I'd say the chances are a lot HIGHER.
__________________
You're About To Discover Secrets About Clicker Training Almost No One Knows About Click Here
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:53 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site