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  #31  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:31 PM
Criosphynx Criosphynx is offline
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One of the visits, he scraped, went away and then told me he didn't scrape deep enough and we had to do it over. Seriously? Can't you see how tramatized my dog is...do it right the first time!

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Yea he blamed it on Walker for his struggling. I went off on him. I offered to hold walker during it. If i had he would have laid right there. But dude was a cat vet not a dog vet.
I would have restrained him also, heck, I would have taken the bites, but he didn't want me too. I guess hindsight is 20/20
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  #32  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:33 PM
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thats why I now just call my vet when he has a staph infection (hasnt in years) but he used to get them every summer. I even had a vet try to take himt o the back room to weigh and give him shots after my warnings........he tried to bite them.
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  #33  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Dekka View Post
(They don't often call it reactivity. But they do talk all over the place about dog dog aggression, which in many cases is reactivity. )


All from various places on the JRTCA website.









There is more but its pretty repetitive.
There is a huge different between reactivity and aggression, they are not one and the same.

I just love how the new polite term that people are giving dogs that are DA/HA, which is reactivity.

Btw, do you know who writes all the stuff for the JRTCA website?? I do and they are hardly an expert lol.
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  #34  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:46 PM
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I offered to hold walker during it. If i had he would have laid right there. But dude was a cat vet not a dog vet.
The vet we go to at work knows that we are more than capable of restraining our dogs while he does procedures, but he won't let us do it because he says his techs are covered under worker's comp. I mean, imagine, if you were a litigious person and you were holding your dog for the skin scrape, and the vet accidently cut your dog and your dog bit you, you could sue the vet.... just not worth it for them.
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  #35  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Criosphynx View Post
Oh man how I know that feeling!

so how is she now, I know you compete, is she functional enough to compete?
Uhh. No. It's Rumor if anyone is wondering. She trains in herding. I honestly thought she would have nothing to do with herding, and while she is very soft, shes willing. So we will keep working at it. She's 4 now, so maybe when she's 8 or 9 we will compete

She *hates* other dogs. She doesn't care for people, and some people just freak her out. She's gotten better. She goes to all trials with me and travels wherever I go. I manage her closely in public/at trials. She is crated unless I am actively working with her.

We just play it one day at a time.
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  #36  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:46 PM
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Ado: Oh I know that well But this is the site breeders who have no problem with aggression or reactive (and I would say a high percentage of aggressive dogs are reactive, though not all reactive dogs are aggressive.. if that makes sense) dogs will point to to validate reactive or aggressive dogs.

Though pretty much any drivey breed seems prone to reactivity.
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  #37  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:56 PM
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Lizzy well then they shouldlearn how to hold one because they didnt Walker got cut.
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  #38  
Old 02-27-2010, 08:12 PM
Criosphynx Criosphynx is offline
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Originally Posted by lizzybeth727 View Post
The vet we go to at work knows that we are more than capable of restraining our dogs while he does procedures, but he won't let us do it because he says his techs are covered under worker's comp. I mean, imagine, if you were a litigious person and you were holding your dog for the skin scrape, and the vet accidently cut your dog and your dog bit you, you could sue the vet.... just not worth it for them.
I figured there was som'thing like this in play, so thats why I didn't insist on helping.
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  #39  
Old 02-27-2010, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Dekka View Post
Ado: Oh I know that well But this is the site breeders who have no problem with aggression or reactive (and I would say a high percentage of aggressive dogs are reactive, though not all reactive dogs are aggressive.. if that makes sense) dogs will point to to validate reactive or aggressive dogs.

Though pretty much any drivey breed seems prone to reactivity.
Of course breeders send people to the site concerning same sex aggression/small animal aggression, not sure what your point is because that has nothing to do with reactivity.

I have known countless low drive dogs that have aggression and/or reactivity issues. And I would love to see some statistics that actually state that high drive or prey drive dogs are more prone to reactivity and/or aggression.

To quote from Control Unleashed by L. McDevitt:
Reactivity:
Reactivity comes from anxiety, which comes from feeling uncertain about something. Reactivity is an information-seeking strategy. A reactive dog will rush toward something or someone that he is uncertain about, barking, lunging,growling, and making a big display. People sometimes preceive reactive behaviour as aggression, but a reactive dog is not rushing in to do damage; he is attempting to assess the threat level of a given situation. End Quote.

Funny how truely aggressive dogs to either humans or other dogs are not ALLOWED in Reactivity classes................for the simple reason that aggressive dogs will engage and will bite provoked or not.

I still maintain that there is a huge difference between a reactive dog and an aggressive dog (which btw has nothing to do with same sex aggression imo.)
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  #40  
Old 02-27-2010, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by adojrts View Post
I just love how the new polite term that people are giving dogs that are DA/HA, which is reactivity.
Personally I like the term "reactive". It's more specific to the cause of the behavior, rather than describing the symptoms like DA/HA is. Yes it is important to know the symptoms, but those terms bring to mind other old training lingo like "alpha" and "dominance", which sadly too many people think is an appropriate way to deal with aggression/reactivity issues. They also scare people (including lawmakers).

Let's say, you have congestion. It's not inaccurate to say "Ado has a runny nose". That doesn't tell us why you have a runny nose, or give any ideas on how to fix it. However, if we say, "Ado has pollen allergies" or "Ado has a cold", we have a much more specific idea of what is causing the symptoms and how to treat the cause. I see "reactivity" vs. "aggression" as the same thing.

To answer Crio's question, Strider used to be happy go lucky around all dogs. Then when he was 1 year old he had a bad week, with three separate incidents of off leash dogs attacking us.

After that he became extremely reactive. If he saw another dog, from 100 yards away he would leap into the air and snarl, roar, etc. I never put him in a position where other dogs got close at that point, but I think if they had gotten close enough he probably would have attacked them. It was a huge problem because he was training to be my service dog, and flipping out like that he definitely couldn't work.

I used the methods in Click to Calm, only I used words as a marker instead of a clicker. Keeping him under threshold, etc. while we reconditioned him to feel good about other dogs again.

In three months, he seemed close to normal. I entered him in a dog show as a test, as it was a safe place (dogs under control) and had a lot of strange dogs. He was perfect, all weekend. Just happy to see them. Then a few months later a great dane attacked him, and he slid backward. Not nearly as bad as before. He wouldn't get outright reactive, but seeing other dogs (esp dogs larger than him) caused him to get stressed, and he would pant and stuff.

We went back and worked some more. Today he is fine with other dogs. He likes playing with them off duty, and ignores them while working. There is another service dog at church, and he is very comfortable laying in a down stay and ignoring that dog from 5 feet away for an hour through a church meeting. Today he went with me to the collie specialty and was totally indifferent/happy with all the hundreds of strange noisy dogs.

My most proud moment lately, was at the grocery store. Someone had a pom with them wearing a SDIT vest. The pom saw Strider and went ballistic, lunging and snarling at the end of its leash. In the past, even on a good day he would have turned around and snarked back at it. I just smiled at him and said, "leave it!" in a cheerful voice. He didn't even look at the pom. He just focused on me and smiled.

I think a huge part of his success was that he started out with a very solid foundation of socialization, good temperament, and training. Because of those things he was able to rebound from those bad experiences pretty well.
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