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  #11  
Old 01-02-2010, 09:09 PM
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adojrts adojrts is offline
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I think it is abusive and often laziness. When people enroll over weight dogs in my classes, I make every effort to provide them with hand outs and information. But it is a fine line, most are not receptive. For agility, I am up front and frank, their dogs will only be able to perform to a certain level and we keep the jumps and A frame low. However, if you are too pushy with them, they quit. So I would rather, have the dog getting some exercise although modified than nothing.
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2010, 09:28 PM
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Doberluv Doberluv is offline
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I have mixed feelings about there being a law. On the one hand, I agree with the dangers of having the government in every aspect of our lives. They already are way too intrusive. I wonder if more education would help. That would certainly be the best way to go in theory....if those who do this to their dogs are the type to be receptive to education. On the other hand, there are laws about starving dogs and leaving them chained out in freezing cold weather. Here is the other extreme...not starving, but we all know how dangerous morbid obesity is. I've seen dogs fatter than that Lab pictured too, as if he isn't bad enough. It's just pitiful and breaks my heart. I think it's as bad as starving a dog. Either way, he's miserable. My dogs have occasionally been a wee bit on the chubby side. As soon as I notice that they're getting that way though, I immediately cut them back and/or raise their exercise level.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2010, 09:38 PM
Artfish Artfish is offline
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Not that I'm a fan, but just think of the good Cesar Millan could do if in every few shows, he went over fit dogs versus overweight dogs and gave some health pointers as well as displaying live examples of too skinny, just right, a little chunky, and "no, that's not Shamu after Rogaine." Victoria Stillwell has had shows that involved assisting owners' dogs with losing weight, always a plus! If the Westminster Kennel Club and AKC Eukanuba folks took some time out to educate on healthy pet weights, that would be another bonus. We need to spoonfeed the John Q Public owners POSITIVE weight loss and maintenance solutions. Admonishing them and beating it into them just doesn't work.

It also doesn't help that in today's society, there are more people and children overweight than not.... if an adult chooses to be overweight, that's fine and dandy, they are able to make the decisions to gain or lose and deal with the consequences but children and pets cannot. But until the mindsets change and less kids eat at McD's and get their exercise in front of the Wii, I doubt Rover and Fido will stop being rewarded with food at every whine and start getting miles of walks. Pet obesity is not the problem, it's a symptom of a larger issue in society.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, please keep the government out of my life! I'm having it up to here with BSL and mandatory S/N.
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2010, 09:42 PM
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smkie smkie is offline
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even 1o pounds increases a dog's chance of developing cancer.

It displaces organs.

IT robs a dog of mobility.

IT does cause later joint issues.

In My Most honest Opinion ever, yes it is abusive.

THis is if all health reasons have been ruled out and it is purely an over fed, lack of exercise issue.
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:01 PM
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I cannot tell you how many dogs that come into work that are overweight, but its probably close to 75% and morbidly obese, maybe 10%. I always stress with their owners about how much and what they are feeding.

They always insist that their dogs don't eat that much kibble. But then I have to come back and say "What about treats?" That's where they are like "Um...not that many" which to me means more than they should be giving...obviously.

When I ask what they use to scoop or measure their dogs food, they always say "Just a scoop, not that big..." but in reality its probably a LOT more than they think. I don't know how many 1 cup measuring cups I hand out each day...probably at least 5 LOL.

Some people get really really angry when I ask how much they feed their dogs or say that their animals should really lose weight. They most always come back at me with "That's the way god made them..." or "He/She is at a really good weight!"

I try and do my best at getting through to people and some people heed that advice, but most of the time not. I think that the people who overfeed their animals, do it more so for themselves than for the dog. It makes them feel good to give their dog a treat, or special food. I don't know if that is true, but I see the delight on their faces when they give a treat after their appointment.

I do think that its abuse. I do think its neglect. I don't think that the law should be a part of it. I agree that education should be the main way that people learn what is best. Because if the law were in place that doesn't mean that people will learn what is best, which in the long run is the best thing to do.
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  #16  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:18 PM
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vanillasugar vanillasugar is offline
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Yes.

I have similar experiences to babydane. People come into the shop where I work with their grossly obese dogs and act like there isn't anything wrong when you try to talk to them about it. Or with shifty eyes they say "Oh, she's on a diet". Ya, uh huh, sure there buddy.

I'm constantly coaching people on how to properly and safely take weight off their dog, but most of the people don't actually listen once they're at home.

And to think, I freaked out when Sierra got a bit "fluffy" when I fed her kibble for a while. I couldn't wait to get her back on raw and tone her up again.
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:23 PM
Brattina88 Brattina88 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoodleMommy View Post
Hmmm... I dont really know where I stand on this.

I make an effort to keep my dogs in really good shape and assuming no health issues it really isnt difficult at all to keep them in a very healthy weight. So when I see an overweight dog, I cringe.

However, growing up we had a dog who I realize now looking back was overweight, not morbidly obese but not a healthy weight at all. However, she was far from neglected... she basically went everywhere with us and was never crated or just sitting home. She was free fed and obviously should not have been. However, she lived a very pampered life. So I cant really say she was abused.

I think a lot of times overweight dogs are just an indication of inexperienced owners and may live very good lives beyond that... if they are taken away from their owners they may likely end up PTS anyway, so we arent really winning there.
I have to agree with this. I've seen grossly overweight pets, and it does affect their health, its so sad! Especially with the rescues. Even Tara - she was malnourished, but overweight. Which sounds crazy, but now that she is looking so much better its so obvious, and I don't know how people can do that to animals!!

I'm with you, though - in my childhood we had a dog who was very overweight, and it effected her health, but I didn't know better until it was too late That is something that I regret everyday... but that doesn't change anything now. And when people make comments about current dogs weight and it freaks me out and I have to remind myself to calm down

I think education would be MUCH more effective than laws, punishment, etc

Whats scary, is a while ago I was trying to help a friend with her obese dog. Her vet said that the dog was at a good weight And I hear from others similar stories all the time
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  #18  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:26 PM
Artfish Artfish is offline
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Quote:
"That's the way god made them..."



God/Nature made what is seen above.


Man can take full 100% credit for that poor creature...........
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  #19  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:27 PM
PoodleMommy PoodleMommy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brattina88 View Post
Whats scary, is a while ago I was trying to help a friend with her obese dog. Her vet said that the dog was at a good weight And I hear from others similar stories all the time
oh yeah... the dog I had growing up was at the vet many many times every year and no vet EVER mentioned her weight... thats why I think we didnt think about it at the time... I actually had a vet tell me to start free feeding Chloe so she would put on weight... she is at a very good weight... I think even most vets dont know what a dog should look like
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  #20  
Old 01-02-2010, 10:36 PM
Brattina88 Brattina88 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoodleMommy View Post
oh yeah... the dog I had growing up was at the vet many many times every year and no vet EVER mentioned her weight... thats why I think we didnt think about it at the time... I actually had a vet tell me to start free feeding Chloe so she would put on weight... she is at a very good weight... I think even most vets dont know what a dog should look like
Same here... until she older (I want to say 10ish?) and the new vet wanted us to stop free feeding and put her on an exercise plan. (she passed away around 11 or 12 I believe). Tested thyriods, etc.

And the dogs with longer, or thick hair, I hear they're too "fat" all the time. Until you wet them down
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