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  #11  
Old 12-07-2009, 09:09 PM
Criosphynx Criosphynx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlassOnion View Post
Well to me the age is what makes Demodex more likely than Sarcoptic. I don't know how well the immune system develops immunity to the mites that cause Sarcoptic mange, but I do know that the genetic defect weakens the immune system which allows Demodex to take hold, thus the chance for re-infestation is present throughout the life time.

this is not my understanding of it...do you have a link that supports this? As far as I know they can only get infected with demo during a certain period of time in puppyhood, and reinfestation would be a result of not killing all the mites in treatment.
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When relapse occurs it is often because the dog appeared to be normal and the owner did not return for the appropriate re-scrapings. Relapse is always a possibility with generalized demodicosis as there is no easy way to confirm that every mite has been killed but most dogs that relapse do so within a 6-12 month period from the time they appear to have achieved cure.
Demodectic Mange

so getting demo again and again would be a result of not treating long enough.



to the op...ask your vet about ivermectin unless you have a collie or other sensitive breed.

Last edited by Criosphynx; 12-07-2009 at 09:20 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-07-2009, 09:20 PM
Buddy'sParents Buddy'sParents is offline
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I would wean Chevy off of prednisone (steroid, baaad stuff to use long term) and I would seek out a holistic care regimen. Sure the meds given will do something with the issue, but they don't get at the root of what causes the issue to begin with, therefore it never really goes away.

Been there, done that, at least half a dozen times. We have FINALLY figured it out. Sometimes you have to combine both modern medicine and holistic care regimens to do the trick. You can PM me for more information if you'd like, and are interested in learning more about the holistic care regimens (would be much more gentle on an older dog as well).
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  #13  
Old 12-07-2009, 09:24 PM
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The only link I have is what I learned in my microbiology, immunology, and parasitology courses.

I don't think it's a case of re-infection in this case due to the age, and besides it's a possibility with demodex and sarcoptic mange both, or any condition where you stop treating it before it's actually eradicated (IE stopping antibiotics prematurely).

It's been a bit since I last thought about this stuff but I'm pretty sure the demodectic mange is aided by a genetic defect that causes the immune system to not reject the demodex mites. That's why Demodectic mange isn't near as contagious as Sarcoptic mange (because not every dog has that defect). It's also the reason why it would fit in well with the age issue. I'd think the dog would have some resistance to sarcoptic mange from over its life. Of course, with the age of the dog it may also be a declining immune system.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:24 PM
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You're right, GO. The way the vet described it to me, is that mange mites are on all dogs' skin, even our skin. The reason they don't cause infection is because the dogs' immune systems fight off the infection; but that doesn't mean the mites aren't there. A dog then, becomes infected with dem. mange when his immune system doesn't fight it off anymore for whatever reason.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:10 PM
Criosphynx Criosphynx is offline
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not entirely true...puppies can be stressed or just simply have immature systems...there does not have to be a genetic component.

LOCALIZED generally means the above, stress or age.

GENERALIZED is generally caused by a genetic defect, tho the animal could just be severly stressed.
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  #16  
Old 12-08-2009, 10:34 PM
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But it's a 10 year old dog, not a puppy. As a puppy it could go either way, but a 10 year old dog would have some resistance to sarcoptic mange mites unless it's never been introduced to them before (which is a possibility, though slim; not all infestations are clinical). That's what leads me to think demodectic.

Problem with demodex theory is the dog would've likely been infected at least a couple times throughout the life time, and thus the owner would have some experience with what was going on, which doesn't seem to be the case.
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  #17  
Old 12-09-2009, 02:10 PM
Criosphynx Criosphynx is offline
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yes, yes, and I agree...the only point Iam making (for lurkers) is that demo does not HAVE to have a genetic component.
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  #18  
Old 12-09-2009, 07:25 PM
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Last night she had a minor nose bleed, do you think that could be a sign of other problems caused by the Prednisone?
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  #19  
Old 12-09-2009, 07:34 PM
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That I've no idea about.

I've never had a client that had a similar side effect, but it might happen. Then again, she might've just walloped herself.
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