Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dogs - General Dog Chat


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 11-08-2009, 01:39 PM
colliewog's Avatar
colliewog colliewog is offline
Collies&Terriers, Oh My!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 2,297
Default

I've never neutered a male before 6-7 yrs old. I've never had any hormone-related bad behaviors, so saw no need to rush. I'm with the others ... If he ain't broke, don't fix him (yet). LOL
__________________
Katie + the Workin' Girls

~Smooth Collies~

URO1 CH "Smidgen" RA,WW-RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)
URO2 CH "Dora" RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)

~American Hairless Terriers (coated)~
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "OE" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "Spud" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-08-2009, 01:53 PM
Boemy's Avatar
Boemy Boemy is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,481
Default

Doesn't not neutering increase the risk of testicular cancer?

I've never had neutering/spaying make any difference in my pets in terms of personality--friendliness, aloofness, dorkiness, etc. Haven't had any ballooning weight gain either.

It DOES sometimes make males stop marking. One of my coworkers had two chihuahuas that started marking her furniture. She neutered them. They stopped. I can guarantee it was the neutering that changed them and not any training on her part because she didn't do a lick of training with those dogs. Thank God they started marking because otherwise she was planning to breed them to a French bulldog her friend owned.

I guess my question would be . . . has he ever been around a female in heat so you'd know how he would react? And if there was a female in heat around, are you positive you can contain him and keep him away from her? Will he drive you crazy while you're keeping him away? All things to consider.

About the surgery risks . . . Really, I don't think there's much risk with neutering. It's not invasive at all and can be done on animals much, much smaller than 5.5 lbs. (My cats were done when they weighed 1 lb 4 ounces each.)

Edit: Are there options for neutering with just local anesthetic instead of "putting them under"? I started thinking about this because it's what they do with horses, isn't it?
__________________

Last edited by Boemy; 11-08-2009 at 02:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:15 PM
colliewog's Avatar
colliewog colliewog is offline
Collies&Terriers, Oh My!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 2,297
Default

Testicular cancer is not that common to be honest.

With neutering, the process is different in dogs than it is in cats (and I assume horses). They require general anesthesia for the process.
__________________
Katie + the Workin' Girls

~Smooth Collies~

URO1 CH "Smidgen" RA,WW-RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)
URO2 CH "Dora" RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)

~American Hairless Terriers (coated)~
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "OE" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "Spud" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:19 PM
Xandra's Avatar
Xandra Xandra is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,776
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by colliewog View Post
With neutering, the process is different in dogs than it is in cats (and I assume horses). They require general anesthesia for the process.
Could you elaborate on that? lol this is intriguing.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:25 PM
colliewog's Avatar
colliewog colliewog is offline
Collies&Terriers, Oh My!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 2,297
Default

How they are 'designed' is different for one, although I don't have pics to elaborate, I can describe the typical castration process, as I've assisted quite frequently in both. (Different vets might do it differently, but this is the most common method for both I've seen over the 14 yrs I was a vet tech).

With cats, you make an incision at the back of the scrotum, pull out the testes, auto-ligate the tubes (some vets will tie off with sutures), cut off the testicles, and then let the area heal on its own ... no suturing.

With dogs, you have to make an incision in front of the scrotum (between the scrotum and the penis sheath), pull the testicles out of the scrotum and out through this incision. Then, the same process - either tie off or auto-ligate and then remove the testicles, and then release the tubes back into the body. Then you suture the incision closed.

With horses/cattle, I honestly don't know what they do.

Now a spay of a dog/cat is the same technique, it's just the boys that are done differently.
__________________
Katie + the Workin' Girls

~Smooth Collies~

URO1 CH "Smidgen" RA,WW-RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)
URO2 CH "Dora" RN,CGC,TT,HIC,VC (2/3 CA)

~American Hairless Terriers (coated)~
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "OE" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "Spud" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:27 PM
Juicy's Avatar
Juicy Juicy is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 8,664
Default

Valentino is neutered......still crazy nutjob of a dog lol and he was neutered 'too early' too. Well all my dogs are fixed, and they're all nutcases.

I was afraid of Princess being a dachshund gaining weight from being spayed, but she's still her twig self.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:30 PM
lizzybeth727's Avatar
lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 6,403
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fransheska101 View Post
hes also very motivated and trainable, which from what I hear.. is not so common with chihuahuas lol
That's actually quite common with chihuahuas.... it's NOT common, however, for chihuahua owners to be driven to train their chis.

I don't think you're going to see much difference when you do neuter Romeo. I've worked with intact males and seen the difference when they get neutered, and IMO the biggest difference is in dog interractions. Two intact males sometimes have issues together, and I've seen some almost obsessive about marking the same spot that the other dog has marked; those things often (not always) go away after the dog is neutered and you give them time for the hormones to get out of their system (it's not an immediate change, takes a few months).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xandra View Post
Could you elaborate on that? lol this is intriguing.
I don't know the process of neutering dogs or cats; but my friend used to be a vet tech and her vet would let her neuter cats on her own because the surgery was so simple. She was not allowed to neuter dogs or other animals, though.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:30 PM
Juicy's Avatar
Juicy Juicy is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 8,664
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boemy View Post

About the surgery risks . . . Really, I don't think there's much risk with neutering. It's not invasive at all and can be done on animals much, much smaller than 5.5 lbs. (My cats were done when they weighed 1 lb 4 ounces each.)
Neutering compared to a spay, is a small invasive procedure. You could get animals like ferrets, rabbits and stuff neutered, why not a small dog? The shelter that I got my dogs fixed, they s/n as young as 6 or 9 weeks I believe it was and as long as the animal is more than 2lbs.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:54 PM
Grab's Avatar
Grab Grab is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,986
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by colliewog View Post
Testicular cancer is not that common to be honest.

.
It may not occur in every unneutered dog, but I've worked in two vet practices (in two different states..so it is not an area specific thing) and have seen quite a few cases of testicular cancer in dogs. My grandparent's dog died of testicular cancer that spread. (and, for what it is worth, I knew of a human male who had a retained testicle not treated in his childhood years for whatever reason, who had testicular cancer that spread to his liver, lungs and brain...so not just a dog thing). We currently have a 1 1/2year old Golden coming in with a nasty testicular tumor, whose owners can't yet afford to neuter him. Part of that is on the vet, who focused on his losing weight and insisted on lab tests for other illnesses (which were negative), so used up their neuter money. So now they cannot yet afford surgery.

I doubt it is as common as mammary cancer in female dogs (which I see much more often), but it does happen. As well as hernia and prostate issues (the latter of which I do see quite commonly).

Just to note, I in no way think every male dog needs to be neutered. As long as their owners are responsible, it really doesn't matter what parts they have. However, for my own pets, since I have no plans to breed, I choose to neuter. I've seen a dog's prolonged recovery after a neuter for a testicle tumor (since they usually take all of the scrotum skin as well) and don't want to take the risk with my pets. And perianal hernias are some of the, to me, grossest things ever. So I'd like to avoid the chance of that too (because ick)

As far as the neuter surgery itself, it takes about 20 minutes tops from first induction of anesthesia, shaving/cleaning the area etc to the last suture. Most of the time I've barely written up my surgery chart by the time the surgery is done.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-08-2009, 02:58 PM
Doberluv's Avatar
Doberluv Doberluv is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: western Wa
Posts: 21,907
Default

The cancer prevelence, type and severity, in intact males is much, much less than those cancers in neutered dogs. Bone cancer is more likely in (early) neutered dogs than it is in neutered. There is a higher incidence of it than say, testicular cancer in intact dogs. If a dog is neutered after he is through maturing, I believe this is much safer and allows his bones to develop more normally. This is my understanding, at any rate.

The main thing for me is that intact dogs....male or female do NOT accidently breed. If a person is not really, really, really good at preventing escapes or accidental breedings, then the dog should be neutered or spayed.
__________________
"If you love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." -- Samuel Adams 1776





"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

Thomas Jefferson
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site