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  #31  
Old 08-11-2009, 12:06 PM
sammgirl sammgirl is offline
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My suggestion is to decide what is MOST important to you on your list and tier them accordingly. IMHO, you have too many specific things you are looking for.

First, almost every dog will shed. Some are just very low shedders.

Secondly, every dog will bark at something at one point in time or another. Separation anxiety is something that you may want to consider if you're going to leave the dog alone alot. IMHO, leaving a dog alone for 5 hours is fine. Leaving a puppy alone for five hours is not fine.

You did say your wife would be at work for only 5 hours a day, right?

In that case, you may want to hire a dog walker or find some way to come home from lunch if you are bent on getting a puppy.

Not saying you can't get a puppy, just saying that getting a puppy is much harder in some cases then an adult dog. When my pup comes, I'm going to have to invest in doggy daycare and a dog walker.

IMHO, a retriever mix will be your best bet if you don't want a pure bred. I'd not suggest labradoodles- I know people who have them and they all say they're ridiculously hyper.

I do not know any personally, so you can take that with a grain of salt. However, if you rescued and adult labradoodle, you'd be saving a life.

As for having to train the kinks out of a rescue dog- yep, if you get an adult, you may very well have to do that. BUT if you get a dog that is being fostered, you can get a better idea of what the dog is like as opposed to you getting one from a shelter.

Many rescue groups send their dogs to foster homes, so maybe a rescue group is going to be up your ally. I'm sure someone here will provide you with groups in your area.

Good luck!
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  #32  
Old 08-11-2009, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammgirl View Post
My suggestion is to decide what is MOST important to you on your list and tier them accordingly. IMHO, you have too many specific things you are looking for.

First, almost every dog will shed. Some are just very low shedders.

Secondly, every dog will bark at something at one point in time or another. Separation anxiety is something that you may want to consider if you're going to leave the dog alone alot. IMHO, leaving a dog alone for 5 hours is fine. Leaving a puppy alone for five hours is not fine.

You did say your wife would be at work for only 5 hours a day, right?

In that case, you may want to hire a dog walker or find some way to come home from lunch if you are bent on getting a puppy.

Not saying you can't get a puppy, just saying that getting a puppy is much harder in some cases then an adult dog. When my pup comes, I'm going to have to invest in doggy daycare and a dog walker.

IMHO, a retriever mix will be your best bet if you don't want a pure bred. I'd not suggest labradoodles- I know people who have them and they all say they're ridiculously hyper.

I do not know any personally, so you can take that with a grain of salt. However, if you rescued and adult labradoodle, you'd be saving a life.

As for having to train the kinks out of a rescue dog- yep, if you get an adult, you may very well have to do that. BUT if you get a dog that is being fostered, you can get a better idea of what the dog is like as opposed to you getting one from a shelter.

Many rescue groups send their dogs to foster homes, so maybe a rescue group is going to be up your ally. I'm sure someone here will provide you with groups in your area.

Good luck!
Very good points to take into consideration.
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  #33  
Old 08-11-2009, 04:42 PM
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If you are willing to give up on letting the dog off leash, you might find your ideal dog in a greyhound rescue. They do get dogs periodically who are pulled from the track because they have zero prey drive and totally will not run. When we looked into getting one, there was an entire litter who was washed from racing at 1 year old because they didn't have the drive. They were all safe with small dogs and cats.

My friends say they could never have a sight hound because of the off leash issue, but it's something we've adjusted to and a small sacrifice for their other good traits. It's a lot easier too, if you have access to fenced acreage for them to play on. We've got a 5 acre pasture and my aunt has a 20 acre pasture.

Standard poodles are good dogs too, and can be trained to be trusted off leash. You can alsomake them look like this:



Or you can have someone make your dog into a mini buffalo:

In general, you can cut down on shedding significantly by feeding a high quality food, plus regular bathing and blowdrying with one of those industrial dog grooming blow dryers. They will literally blow all the dead hair out of your dog's coat. It's great.
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  #34  
Old 08-11-2009, 05:19 PM
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I will fully champion a shelter mutt.

Do a little background research and find a shelter or rescue in your area with a good reputation. Then go to their adoptions coordinator with what you're looking for. A good place will help you find a couple dogs that meet your criteria. Many even do "trial adoptions" so you can take the dog for a week or two and see if the prey drive is too high. (My rescue actually requires this for homes with other animals or small children)

I got nearly everything I could have ever wanted in a dog. Minimal shedding (I only see it when I vacuum), energy/drive, lover of people, snuggler, good with other dogs, under 35 lbs, smart/easy to train, etc, etc. Yes, she has a few quirks (she's afraid of big trucks/buses), but that could have happened with a puppy too. Getting an adult dog, I knew what I was getting. We worked with a great shelter who was honest and up front with us, and had done very good temperament testing.

I think it's a good idea to have some dog breeds in mind when you go in (though we didn't), but I wouldn't limit yourself to them. The individual dog's temperament isn't necessarily going to be the breed standard.
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  #35  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prock View Post
Hmmm... thanks very much for the suggestion but my masculinity is not satisfied with a poodle.
After reading your questions I was going to say Poodle too. My husband said amost the SAME thing you did when we got our first minature Poodle. That was almost 20 years ago and we have had two so far. We have had two Akitas and a Shepard Husky Mix during our 19 years of marriage. Now we have a 9 month old Akita/Doberman mix, a 10 year old Poodle and a 4 year old Chihuahua.

He now will tell anyone the only breed he would ever own, if it was only up to him, is a Minature Poodle. The only complaint I would have about a Poodle is the grooming. I used to groom but now I take him to a groomer every 6 or 8 weeks.

I was going to also suggest a Boxer but they can't be outside for long.
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  #36  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:38 PM
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[QUOTE=prock;1442757]Hi there,


Some of my priorities:
  • Good with kids
  • Quiet-ish ("hello" when someone's at the door is ok)
  • Not too much grooming
  • Plays fetch with a frisbee and tennis ball
  • Good with mixed outdoor/indoor environment
  • Trainable but not smarter than me
  • Can let off the leash safely
  • Not going to kill the neighbor's cat
  • Not going to bark all day at the neighbor's cat
  • Prefer fur that is soft, short(er), and consistent length
  • Ok with snow (Canadian winters)
  • Ok with sleeping by itself (indoors)
  • Low odor
  • Prefer consistent fur color
  • Don't want to have my clothes covered in fur after getting off the couch
  • Will go for a jog with me

I used to train, show and groom dogs. I also have studied the breeds and have met many dogs. Like someone said you do have a lot that you are looking for and to be honest both the Poodles I ever owned fit all of these. It is not that I am really a "Poodle" person either, I really like the bigger dogs.

Both my mines were GREAT with kids even kids they met for the first time

barked but not excessive like the Chihuahua and learned "stop" quickly when I told them to stop barking

Okay, you got me on the grooming... lol

Both loved to play fetch, my 10 year old still plays like a puppy

Not too great with being outdoors for too long but not as delicate as some think either

They are super easy to train, my first was shown in obediecne and agility and received many titles. My second could do a full agility course at 5 months old and won first in his agility class at 6 mons old. I swear you can just let them watch another dog and they knew what to do, very little training was needed and they remember so much. My first Poodle had not even seen an agility course in 4 years but when we went back (he was 7) he still knew what to do.

With minimal training they can be off leash. My mini is the only one of my three I could take anywhere off leash and not be nervous. He will do a 180 back to me when called even when chasing a deer (it happened). I really don't even work with training him anymore either.

Poodles are good with other animals, don't have a strong prey drive

their hair can be kept whatever lenght you like if you go to groomer like every other month (if kept short)

Mine were both fine with playing in the snow

They can be taught to sleep anywhere indoors (but would prefer to be in a room with someone in the family)

They will definitely jog with you, my neighbor jogs with his Standard Poodle everyday, my 10 year old still goes for brisk walks with me and does not tire out

mine never really had a bad odor

they do not shed!

(phew I think I covered them all)

Like I said it is not that I am this huge "have to get a Poodle" person but to be honest they have been the easiest dogs I ever owned. I am more of a large dog person though.
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  #37  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prock View Post
Shedding is falling off the list of my major concerns. If I spend a couple minutes brushing the dog every day how significantly will that reduce the amount of fur on the furniture?
IF you keep up with the daily brushing it will help a lot but I know I am not so good with keeping up on it. I did not realize how nice it was to not have a shedding dog until I got the mix I have now. What a difference it is! I am constantly sweeping my kitchen, hall and vacuuming. My 16 year old are complaining about dog hair on their black work pants. AND he does not even shed "that" bad. It is just I only had a Poodle (no shedding) and a Chihuahua (sheds I'm sure but he's 4lbs how much hair could there be, we never noticed it at all) for so long I forgot what it was like to have dog hair in the house. It doesn't bother me really, I adore my Reno no matter what! He really is a GREAT dog, I got lucky he's everything I wanted and it's a fluck I got him.

I did break down and buy this expensive brush that so many swear by. It is called the Furminator and what a difference! I did not think a brush could make such a difference but I can brush him with any other type of brush (I have a LOT of brushes) and a few hairs come off, then go over the same spot and the Furminator is full of hair. His coat even looks so much nicer.
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  #38  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:53 PM
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wow... I just noticed how many replies I posted.... I look like I'm taking over! Sorry did not mean to say SO MUCH!
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  #39  
Old 08-12-2009, 05:52 PM
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Id sugest a poodle. I never get why people dont think youd be less manly if you owned one. they are a retricing breed, much like a lab or goldens job. the haircut is for a reason. And you dont need to keep it cut in that haircut at all.

If you are considering a doodle, you know they do look very much like poodles. lots shed like crazy as well. since they are not a breed, they dont breed true and can shed, look more like a lab, look more like a poodle, ect.

There is a very rough looking biker guy at our dog park with 3 standard poodles. he adores them and takes about them like they are the best breed ever. Whch they are a awsome breed.
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  #40  
Old 08-12-2009, 07:05 PM
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I would suggest a labrador or lab mix. They're about the most common shelter dog and thus you can look until you find the perfect one--lots to choose from. They do shed, but otherwise fit your criteria very well.

Regarding the sighthounds . . . My understanding is that even sighthounds who are "good with cats" will often only be good with THEIR family's cats, indoors. The OP wants a dog that will not kill the neighbor's cat. I wouldn't suggest a sighthound.

A lot of "doodles" shed . . . There is no reason to get a "doodle" over a labrador or a poodle, IMO. I mean, if you see one at a shelter and fall in love with it, great. But I wouldn't buy one from a breeder.
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