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  #11  
Old 01-25-2008, 06:55 PM
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adojrts adojrts is offline
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Ok,
For obstacle discriminations, start easy, and don't start with a tunnel if he is a terminal tunnel sucker (hoover lol).
Now you have to be able to reliably be able to send your dog to any piece of equipment, if you can't then you have to go back and train this, from all angles and positions for the dog and the handler. And with the handler being static (not moving forward). You also need to be able to recall your dog over or through obstacles, this is also a great time to practice those startline stays!

Start with the tire and a jump or jump/tunnel. Set them up about 15 ft apart (the closer they become the harder the discrimination) side by side. Facing in the same direction but with one angled off slightly away from the other one. (if this doesn't make sense, let me know and I'll try to get some diagrams to you or post some diagrams)
Start closer to one of the obstacles and about 10 -12 ft away (or closer if you have to). The goal is for your dog to take the tire without any kind of body language or movement from the handler, that they move forward and take the obstacle on a verbal only. Don't use your dogs name, just say 'tire', give huge rewards if he does it. If he has trouble understanding, put a target on the ground on the other side to encourage him. With some dogs, in the beginning, they need the handler to support the line with their body language and to give a hand signal. But each time the dog successfully does the obstacle, next time use less of a hand cue signal etc until they can do it on a verbal only. Give one verbal and only one verbal command and don't say his name with the obstacle name, you don't want to have his name as part of the cue. Don't talk (encouragement, good boys etc) to him while he is going forward to the obstacle, so many people at this point give a second command and the dog head checks, spins or comes back. The distance that you start away from the obstacle depends on your dog, some dogs need to start closer and progress to longer distances, others can start further away, you know your dog best, start at the distance you KNOW he will be successful at. Don't get greedy. When the dog can do that obstacle 3 times (and only 3 times and don't get greedy!) move closer to the other obstacle, at the same distance away and work it.
Start the training session with this work, the dog needs to be fresh, DON'T drill. If he is successful doing each obstacle three times, QUIT. And move on to other training or just go play with him or go for a nice relaxing walk.
The goal is for you to be able to send him to each obstacle on a verbal and at a distance and for you to be able to stand between the obstacles (with distance back from them) with your dog beside you and for him to choose the correct obstacle. After each obstacle he should come back to you, rewarded, set up for the next obstacle and sent. As he understands the game, change the obstacles. But be careful, make sure which ever obstacles that you use, that he knows that obstacle inside out, and all the required behaviours for doing that obstacle safely, like contacts or weaves.
Then you can recall him, leave your dog in a stay, stand beyond the obstacles and between them (remember to start by being slightly closer to the obstacle that you want in the beginning for success). Give him the cue 'tire', reward. You can also recall him to you by using your recall word without him doing either obstacle, this is very valuable to train as well.
If at anytime, he doesn't do the obstacle that you desire, move back to the point where he was successful and stay there for a couple of sessions. Then try progressing again.
If any of this doesn't make sense or isn't perfectly clear, ask and I'll try to explain it better.
And no matter what happens, don't get frustrated or tell him 'no', he is learning and is trying to do his best, give him every chance to get it right no matter how long it takes. Some dogs get this game very quickly while others can take weeks. Don't drill !!!! Keep sessions very short and happy, even if they are not going as you want, there is always tomorrow or the next day.
This is a good start, when you are having success, let me know and we ll start on the other issues. Of course you can also train different focus games away from the agility equipment which wont over face him or stress him.

Good luck
Lynn
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  #12  
Old 01-26-2008, 10:31 AM
tessa_s212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adojrts View Post
Ok,
For obstacle discriminations, start easy, and don't start with a tunnel if he is a terminal tunnel sucker (hoover lol).
Now you have to be able to reliably be able to send your dog to any piece of equipment, if you can't then you have to go back and train this, from all angles and positions for the dog and the handler. And with the handler being static (not moving forward). You also need to be able to recall your dog over or through obstacles, this is also a great time to practice those startline stays!

Start with the tire and a jump or jump/tunnel. Set them up about 15 ft apart (the closer they become the harder the discrimination) side by side. Facing in the same direction but with one angled off slightly away from the other one. (if this doesn't make sense, let me know and I'll try to get some diagrams to you or post some diagrams)
Start closer to one of the obstacles and about 10 -12 ft away (or closer if you have to). The goal is for your dog to take the tire without any kind of body language or movement from the handler, that they move forward and take the obstacle on a verbal only. Don't use your dogs name, just say 'tire', give huge rewards if he does it. If he has trouble understanding, put a target on the ground on the other side to encourage him. With some dogs, in the beginning, they need the handler to support the line with their body language and to give a hand signal. But each time the dog successfully does the obstacle, next time use less of a hand cue signal etc until they can do it on a verbal only. Give one verbal and only one verbal command and don't say his name with the obstacle name, you don't want to have his name as part of the cue. Don't talk (encouragement, good boys etc) to him while he is going forward to the obstacle, so many people at this point give a second command and the dog head checks, spins or comes back. The distance that you start away from the obstacle depends on your dog, some dogs need to start closer and progress to longer distances, others can start further away, you know your dog best, start at the distance you KNOW he will be successful at. Don't get greedy. When the dog can do that obstacle 3 times (and only 3 times and don't get greedy!) move closer to the other obstacle, at the same distance away and work it.
Start the training session with this work, the dog needs to be fresh, DON'T drill. If he is successful doing each obstacle three times, QUIT. And move on to other training or just go play with him or go for a nice relaxing walk.
The goal is for you to be able to send him to each obstacle on a verbal and at a distance and for you to be able to stand between the obstacles (with distance back from them) with your dog beside you and for him to choose the correct obstacle. After each obstacle he should come back to you, rewarded, set up for the next obstacle and sent. As he understands the game, change the obstacles. But be careful, make sure which ever obstacles that you use, that he knows that obstacle inside out, and all the required behaviours for doing that obstacle safely, like contacts or weaves.
Then you can recall him, leave your dog in a stay, stand beyond the obstacles and between them (remember to start by being slightly closer to the obstacle that you want in the beginning for success). Give him the cue 'tire', reward. You can also recall him to you by using your recall word without him doing either obstacle, this is very valuable to train as well.
If at anytime, he doesn't do the obstacle that you desire, move back to the point where he was successful and stay there for a couple of sessions. Then try progressing again.
If any of this doesn't make sense or isn't perfectly clear, ask and I'll try to explain it better.
And no matter what happens, don't get frustrated or tell him 'no', he is learning and is trying to do his best, give him every chance to get it right no matter how long it takes. Some dogs get this game very quickly while others can take weeks. Don't drill !!!! Keep sessions very short and happy, even if they are not going as you want, there is always tomorrow or the next day.
This is a good start, when you are having success, let me know and we ll start on the other issues. Of course you can also train different focus games away from the agility equipment which wont over face him or stress him.

Good luck
Lynn
What I'm going to do is probably try to video every training exercise I do with Marq that you've instructed me to do here. There's snow on the ground right now, so it might be a month or so.

As for the tire discrimination. Marq knows the tire by "jump" just as he does the others. He doesn't know it by "tire". I'd *have* to give him a physical cue. could I instead just use other obstacles?

And he doesn't know how to target. I tried teaching him, and he was always too nervous and fidgety to learn.
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  #13  
Old 01-26-2008, 11:26 AM
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Dekka Dekka is offline
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Targetting is a really good skill. LOL if Zo can target I am sure Marq can It took a long time, but she got it, and boy does she have it now. (Zo is a dog of few skills but WOW the skills she has, she HAS if you get what I mean)
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  #14  
Old 03-06-2008, 09:17 PM
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much?
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  #15  
Old 03-06-2008, 09:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doglover83 View Post
Nice tips!

teaches him to make his own strategy on how to finish the course efficiently.
lol I have spent YEARS training to avoid my dog from making his own *strategies*!! And that hasn't been easy with Petie
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