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  #31  
Old 02-07-2008, 07:13 PM
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Thanks for posting this. I get pretty paranoid about Sophie bloating, she's fed on top of a milk crate now,.
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  #32  
Old 02-07-2008, 07:47 PM
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I have to disagree with the majority of the dogs involved in the purdue study being Danes. The original study looked at 1920 different dogs of which only 216 were great Danes. The number one breed at 298 was Newfoundlands and then 264 Irish Setters. Interestingly enough the #2 breed behind Danes to suffer from bloat in the purdue study were Akitas followed by Bloodhounds and then Weimaraners. Although large breeds and not giants Akitas and Weimaraners are not noted breeds for needing raised feeders for the 'comfort factor'.

Although I am not familiar with Danes and the percentages of owners who choose to use raised feeders, I do not think that the purdue study soley reached its conclusions based on Danes and raised feeders when other smaller breeds rated on the top of the scale as breeds at risk who were also extensively studied. Although I could be wrong, and the second study could have looked almost exclusively at Danes and their feeding habits to determine that there was indeed a correlation.

As an owner of a giant breed, a 190lb 34" at the shoulder Saint Bernard, I do not think he looks any more uncomfortable than my beagle when they are eating. Physiologically he does not exert any more effort bending his neck to the floor than my beagle does. Although my beagle is closer to the floor, his neck is proportionate to the rest of his body just as my Saints is. If I broke their body sizes down to the same size on a scale they are both bending the same distance proportionate to their own bodies. Albeit a Dane does have a longer neck than a Saint.

I think it is important to let owners concerned about bloat and gastric torsion aware that there is a very high correlation between bloating and elevated food dishes. In the end owners should choose what they think is best for their dogs and what they are comfortable with. It is also important to point out that it is only a correlation and the reasons behind it are unknown. I like you believe there is a genetic factor and am mostley concerned about stress and the correlation between that and bloating.

I would be very interested in seeing a study based soley on 50% of the dogs studied using raised dishes. With the last purdue study released concluding on such a high correlation I am sure that we will see more tests and results on these findings.

In the end, bloat is terrifying. I am so sorry that you had to go through it.
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  #33  
Old 06-22-2008, 09:39 PM
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i just wanted to show this as well just in case it could be of any help because yoshi didn't show each phase. red is what yoshi showed

PHASE1
SYMPTOMS:
1. Pacing, restlessness, panting and salivating.
2. Unproductive attempts to vomit (every 10-20 minutes).
3. Abdomen exhibits fullness and beginning to enlarge.

ACTIONS:
Call Veterinarian to advise of bloat case enroute. Transport dog to Veterinarian immediately.

PHASE 2
SYMPTOMS:
1. Very restless, whining, panting continuously, heavy salivating.
2. Unproductive attempts to vomit (every 2-3 minutes).
3. Dark red gums.
4. High heart rate (80 to 100 BPM).
5. Abdomen is enlarged and tight, emits hollow sound when thumped.

ACTIONS:
Apply first aid if Veterinarian care is more than 10 minutes away.
Then, transport dog to Veterinarian immediately.

PHASE 3
SYMPTOMS:
1. Gums are white or blue (Could not tell on Hannah-dark gums)
2. Dog unable to stand or has a spread-legged, shaky stance.
3. Abdomen is very enlarged.
4. Extremely high heart rate (100 BPM or greater)and weak pulse.
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  #34  
Old 06-22-2008, 09:47 PM
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Please keep us posted !!!
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  #35  
Old 07-26-2008, 11:18 AM
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Our 10 year old GSD has just suffered with bloat whilst in kennels. It was the most traumatic experience ever and thanks only to the sharp eyes of a 14 year old kennel maid, our dog was saved by emergency surgery. He isn't himself though afterwards and i don't think he will ever be the same dog again, but he is still with us and still loves life so thats the main thing.

Bloat happens SO fast and without someone who can spot the signs, it can so easily kill a dog in no time at all. We are counting our lucky stars.
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  #36  
Old 08-21-2008, 01:43 AM
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Oh God... I hope to God Padfoot never gets bloat, because guess what...? my mom would not pay the bill. She would not find an E-Vet if it were the middle of the night. She would not believe me even if I screamed at her that it was bloat.
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  #37  
Old 08-21-2008, 02:06 AM
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I didn't read this whole thread, but being as I own the breed currently listed as #3 on the list of breeds who most commonly bloat, I have made it my business to inform myself as much as possible.

Although not the be all and end all factor that will likely cause or prevent bloating, I just wanted to mention, that although at one time, it was thought that elevated feeding could PREVENT bloating, it is now NOT recommended for bloat-prone breeds.

Just an FYI.
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  #38  
Old 10-20-2008, 11:41 AM
K9Obedience.com K9Obedience.com is offline
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Totally TRUE! Yes, we are in the process of updating our breed profile on large and bloat-prone breeds to reflect this new research which suggests not only that elevated water and food bowls doesn't help prevent bloat, but that it CAN make it MORE LIKELY. I am not sure of the reason, but i had a communication from a woman involved in the research herself, and she explained how it is a myth, and i can well believe it too, how unnatural is a raised food bowl anyway? Dogs eat from the floor, and generally, large breeds tend to eat slower due to the increased stress on their internal passages from eating further away from the food (i.e. on the floor). By raising the bowls, it is suggested that MORE food can be ingested and at a faster rate, which as we all know is a sure cause of bloat.
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  #39  
Old 10-20-2008, 12:19 PM
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I lost a shepherd to bloat years ago. While we took her right into the vet, the vet that saw her diagnosed it as " gastic upset" medicated her and said to take her home. Being slightly sedated, she died in her sleep as not having the operation. It was horrid.. ( needless to say I never used that vet again..)
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  #40  
Old 10-23-2008, 06:09 AM
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Tragic, so sorry for you.
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