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  #21  
Old 06-24-2007, 08:57 PM
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Paige Paige is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SizzleDog View Post
PS - to answer some questions...

The Difference Between the Pembrokes and the Cardigans.
Physically, the Cardi is larger, longer, and bigger boned. Pems have foxy heads, Cardis have a more houndish look. This makes sense, as Pems are more Vallhund/Spitz type, while the Cardi is more of the Dachshund type.

Pembrokes come in less colors than the Cardigan. Pembrokes have docked tails to avoid the gruesome fate of it being stepped on by a cow.


And yes, it's farily easy to find a Corgi (mostly Pems, in my expereince) that still works stock - or at least tends to the horses in the stables. Actually, one of the best places to find a working corgi breeder is to attend a horse show! My corgi mentor acquired a male Pem (who unfortunately had to be neutered after an injury) who was seen herding cattle with his mother at then tender age of 12 weeks. Now THAT'S the kind of dog I wanted, but ufortunately that breeder didn't have any breedign plans for the next few years... and I couldn't wait that long...

Where are you located (state)?


British Columbia. I'm Canadian.
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  #22  
Old 06-25-2007, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SizzleDog View Post
Corgis co-exist beautifully with the "Big Dawgs"
I'm not trying to throw a wet blanket on the situation, but I've had the opposite experience. Jedi and I shared an obedience class with a male Corgi. Slinky broke away from his handler and attacked Jedi, who was probably 4 times his size. Then at agility practice earlier this week, Loki was introduced to a Corgi (I think a male). They sniffed noses just fine, but when Loki tried to initiate play, the other dog got quite pissy with her.

I'm not sure if this is a trait common to the breed, but just sharing our experiences. In fairness, I've seen Corgis at agility trials who are very good about keeping focused on the task at hand.
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  #23  
Old 06-25-2007, 07:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bahamutt99 View Post
I'm not trying to throw a wet blanket on the situation, but I've had the opposite experience. Jedi and I shared an obedience class with a male Corgi. Slinky broke away from his handler and attacked Jedi, who was probably 4 times his size. Then at agility practice earlier this week, Loki was introduced to a Corgi (I think a male). They sniffed noses just fine, but when Loki tried to initiate play, the other dog got quite pissy with her.

I'm not sure if this is a trait common to the breed, but just sharing our experiences. In fairness, I've seen Corgis at agility trials who are very good about keeping focused on the task at hand.
My experience has been half and half with Corgis. But even the ones who I've met who have been fine with other dogs are still super bossy. They're a challenge, but great little dogs.
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  #24  
Old 06-28-2007, 12:38 PM
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I started Herding with my Belgians, but the only dogs that I see herding are Border Collies and Belgian Sheep Dogs (the black ones). I know there are other dogs herding out there, but these seem to be most common around here. Somebody suggested a Belgian Malinois for herding, I'd forget about any of the protection bred Malinois, I think they'd have way too much prey drive for herding. My black dog has too much prey drive, but I'm slowly getting him under control so he doesn't eat the sheep.

But, what I really want to say is you should consider an Airedale. They were breed as all around farm dogs and do just about everything, including herding. I have a friend that has had Airedales for decades and I think they are pretty cool dogs. Super nice, but protective of their property. They probably won't break any speed records in agility, but they'll do whatever you ask, pretty much.
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  #25  
Old 06-28-2007, 01:17 PM
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I'm not familiar with the Corgis but I've heard they are like a "German Shepherd Lite"

For those who "don't like the looks of a German Shepherd these days", try looking at ones that are bred for working, not American show dogs. You all have seen enough pics of Gunnar to know that not all GSD's are slope backed. As far as them being bred for sports and not real work, I imagine the breeders of those dogs may beg to differ. You can surely find a herding capable GSD out there.
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  #26  
Old 06-28-2007, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanL View Post
I'm not familiar with the Corgis but I've heard they are like a "German Shepherd Lite"

For those who "don't like the looks of a German Shepherd these days", try looking at ones that are bred for working, not American show dogs. You all have seen enough pics of Gunnar to know that not all GSD's are slope backed. As far as them being bred for sports and not real work, I imagine the breeders of those dogs may beg to differ. You can surely find a herding capable GSD out there.

Oh I am not saying they aren't out there. Just they don't seem to be many. Which is sad because they are a beautiful breed.
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  #27  
Old 07-11-2007, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by BlackPuppy View Post
Somebody suggested a Belgian Malinois for herding, I'd forget about any of the protection bred Malinois, I think they'd have way too much prey drive for herding.
I have to disagree. Course I am partial to the Malinois from working/protection lines :-) But my current herding trial dog is not only from protection bred lines, but has an FRII title in addition to her herding titles. My up and coming pup, who is showing awesome talent so far, is from a solid working bloodline and will eventually be titled in Sch or FR, in addition to the herding titles.

I have done an HCT or HIC with 6 Malinois, all from solid working bloodlines. 2 of them titled in protection sports. I've done herding lessons with another 3 more, once again working lines, some titled in Sch or FR. Add to that at least 5 pups from my breeding who have earned HIC or HCT. In none of the cases was gripping or an excess of prey drive an issue. Yes, most of the dogs tried to grip at some point (my FRIII male never tried to grip, he'd body slam them if they refused to move or challenged him) but one or two corrections and they stopped that behavior. They'd still try on occasion, but a verbal "get out of there" was enough after those first few corrections. An instinct test or a few lessons doesn't mean the dog would have been a high level herding dog, but it did show at least the basic instinct, and controllability of the dog around livestock.

I'm actually in the middle of digitizing some of the HIC/HCT runs, I have a video of Cali doing the HSAs course at a fun match online.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AE1H4EbfPU

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Nexxus - 7 months, 4th lesson, first time in the big arena
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  #28  
Old 07-12-2007, 08:57 AM
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That's cool. Actually, I'm training my Malinois girl for herding also. We don't do protection, but her pedigree is full of FRIII dogs. I was just not recommending it. I was also going to suggest the Groenendael, aka Belgian Sheep Dog. My friend herds with all of hers and the Belgians are generally all purpose dogs.

I really just started with my girl, and she hurt her pads so badly we're taking a break. She has one pad that has a deep cut and isn't healing quickly. I had the vet look at it and she said it's just going to take time.

My Black dog is a Belgian mix with protection training, and after 4 lessons I decided he was too bitey to continue. I feel like if I have to hit him with the stick there's something going on in his mind I'm not liking. Otherwise, he's a perfectly obedient dog. BTW, the herding teacher thought it was just fine.

http://home.earthlink.net/~hrpmann/dogs/
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  #29  
Old 07-12-2007, 11:22 AM
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How about a Norwegian Buhund? I was brought up with them and we have bred a few that have gone on to actually do the job they were intended to do very well. Not sure how common they are in your neck of the woods though.
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  #30  
Old 07-13-2007, 12:41 AM
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