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  #21  
Old 04-12-2007, 11:35 AM
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Spiritus Spiritus is offline
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I agree with Saintgirl. I don't believe eating from floor level causes neck and back strain. Dogs were created to eat this way and if it truly was a problem, they would have evolved to have necks like horses. And, when it comes down to it, even if there was neck and back strain, what's worse, a sore neck or death from bloat. The threat of bloat is just too much of a threat. It almost always means death....
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  #22  
Old 04-12-2007, 11:52 AM
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I know almost nothing about this, never really heard of it before. Is it just large dogs that get it? What causes it.
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  #23  
Old 04-16-2007, 07:27 AM
killerz298 killerz298 is offline
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I put a large rock in his bown and that has seemed to slow him down greatly. I am going to look into the issues about the raised feeder and maybe I will lower it to the medium setting instead of high as a compromise.
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  #24  
Old 04-16-2007, 08:52 AM
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Such a fabulous post!! Thankyou!
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  #25  
Old 04-21-2007, 07:56 PM
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Boy, this gives us all cause for pause. I am glad you baby is doing well. I have vet insurance so I never second guess.
This just reassured me I am doing the right think by having it.
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  #26  
Old 05-28-2007, 04:12 PM
snorzzz snorzzz is offline
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My Belle, because of bad hips and old age, has begun eating while laying down. Is it dangerous for a dog to lay down and eat? She lays on her stomach, with the food bowl between her front legs.

Now I am concerned about this.
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  #27  
Old 06-25-2007, 08:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlar View Post
I know almost nothing about this, never really heard of it before. Is it just large dogs that get it? What causes it.
Wow, sorry I haven't replied to these. (Blush)

Carlar, no it's not just large dogs that bloat. Primarly deep chested, larger breeds such as Great Danes, Irish Setters, Wolfhounds, Shepherds, etc are at the highest risk, but smaller dogs such as pugs, doxies, and beagles have been known to bloat as well.

The cause is still unknown. Some signs point to genetics, but no one knows for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snorzzz View Post
My Belle, because of bad hips and old age, has begun eating while laying down. Is it dangerous for a dog to lay down and eat? She lays on her stomach, with the food bowl between her front legs.

Now I am concerned about this.
Snorzzz, I wouldn't be too concerned. Hannah now eats laying down on occasion. Honestly, in my experience, it's not the heighth that they eat from that is a contributing factor. Hannah bloated nearly 10 hours after her meal, so I don't really feel that how she ate played too much a part in her bloating. Gulping, and eating while stressed, however are big risk factors in my opinion.
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  #28  
Old 12-21-2007, 01:09 PM
K9Obedience.com K9Obedience.com is offline
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I have written an article about Bloat should anyone want to know more about this life threatening condition.
http://www.k9obedience.co.uk/dogtrai...topic.php?t=88

My daughters GSD developed Bloat whilst in boarding kennels, not from exercising too soon after a meal but simply from drinking too much water as the day was very warm. This combined with the stress of being in kennels caused him to bloat. I raced to the vets and arrived as the dog was being lifted into the surgery. I cannot describe just how awful it was to see my daughters great big GSD in such pain and distress. His mouth and muzzle was covered with frothy white mucus, his sides were heaving and his heart was racing. As the dog collapsed on the floor he was rushed into emergency surgery. He had full gastric torsion, in other words his stomach had totally twisted cutting off the blood supply to various organs. The first thing the vet had to do was stabilise the dog by putting him on a drip to get vital fluids into him. Then he was cut open, his stomach was emptied and sewn onto the abdomen to prevent it twisting again. His spleen had to be removed. We were told that he did not have much chance of surviving as at 12 years old there was a real danger of him suffering heart failure.

Thankfully his heart wasd strong and he is now fit and well. Were it not for the quick thinking of the kennel maid the old dog would not be with us now. If anyone suspects that their dog may be bloating seek veterinary advice immediately as every second counts if the the animal is to be saved.

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  #29  
Old 01-07-2008, 09:20 PM
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Thanks for the very important information.

I work at a doggie daycare/kennel and we require that ALL dogs are rested for 1.5 hours after a meal to prevent bloat and that no dogs are fed an hour before visiting us.

The studies I have read have all showed that raised feeders don't make a difference.

I guess some dogs are just pre-disposed to it, but there are certainly ways to reduce the risk.
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  #30  
Old 02-07-2008, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiritus View Post
This article on bloat says NOT to feed with an elevated bowl...

http://globalspan.net/bloat.htm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiritus View Post
I agree with Saintgirl. I don't believe eating from floor level causes neck and back strain. Dogs were created to eat this way and if it truly was a problem, they would have evolved to have necks like horses. And, when it comes down to it, even if there was neck and back strain, what's worse, a sore neck or death from bloat. The threat of bloat is just too much of a threat. It almost always means death....
My opinion of the purdue bloat study (where the insinuation that raised feeders contribute to bloat originated) is the same as Linda Arndt's...

About Elevated Dishes

Anyone that has owned these dogs, knows that every single book written about Great Dane or giants, regardless of how old the book is, states we need to elevate the dishes. That means, the majority of giant breeds in this country are fed from elevated dishes and in fact, it was Vet schools such as Purdue that taught us to elevate the dishes years ago. Even without that information from breeders, books or veterinarians, it is obvious to an owner, the dogs are more comfortable with their dishes elevated so they do not have to strain to eat. This information about elevated dishes is taught by breeders to buyers, by vets to clients, by books on the breed to the new puppy buyer who is trying to educate themselves.

The majority of dogs involved in this study, were owned by Great Dane breeders or dogs purchased from Dane breeders, and that is where the owners received the information about the bloat study. With that information in mind, it is logical that the majority, if not ALL of the dogs that came in to Dr. Glickman's survey, have been fed with an elevated dish. This is simply how he came to his "opinion" that elevated dishes cause bloat. Also you need to know most of the dogs that were viewed in this study were seen-chest measured, while they were at a Great Dane Specialty show or at the Great Dane week long National Specialty which means all the dogs tested were actually owned by professional breeders. Virtually 99% all the dogs measured would have been raised with elevated dishes, hence the high numbers in the study.


(in my opinion, that is the same logic as if you see a pregnant woman with pierced ears, that means every woman with pierced ears is pregnant ).


There is, as of now, only correlative speculation, not causative as to what causes bloat. I know there is some research being done at the present to try to identify a genetic marker. One can only hope this is successful!
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