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  #11  
Old 03-10-2007, 12:51 PM
tinies12 tinies12 is offline
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Sounds like you put alot of time and effort in your dog! If I were looking for a Chow pup I know I would go to some one like you. It's fine to know that you love your dog as much as you do there are too many bad and uncaring dog owners out there! You do what makes your heart sing, let it be breeding your dog or not!

Your heart is in the right place and that is what counts! I love this forum they all have thier heart where it belongs. A solid family I can be proud of!
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  #12  
Old 03-10-2007, 01:20 PM
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Boemy Boemy is offline
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Originally Posted by IliamnasQuest View Post
So my friend says to me "you won't ever breed Khana .. you're too close to her". She went on to say that she was once told by someone who mentored her way back that a breeder should never get too close (emotionally) to their brood bitches. You have to be able to deal with the situations without being over-run with emotion. You can love them and consider them to be important to you, but you can't have that really deep bond because it becomes too difficult.

Your friend's mentor's statement sounds pretty harsh to me. "Sorry, dog, I can love you in a generic kind of way but I can't REALLY bond with you because I want puppies. Tough break!"

While I'm sure breeding requires some tough decisions (including possibly making decisions in a medical emergency), I don't see why bonding with a brood bitch would be bad.

I mean . . . I've never heard parents say to their grown up daugher, "Now, whatever you do DON'T HAVE KIDS, something really terrible might happen to you during pregnancy! You could DIE!", which indeed can happen despite all our medical advances. No, it's always "BABIES, HAVE BABIES, GIVE ME GRANDBABIES!"
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  #13  
Old 03-10-2007, 03:12 PM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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Thanks for clarifying, bubbatd. That's why I asked!

elegy, you brought up another good point - placing the puppies! I can only think of a small handful of people that I would want a pup to go to (at this time) and I'm not sure they'd even WANT a chow pup! *L* So finding homes that I would be comfortable with would be hard too. Luckily chows tend to have small litters, and even smaller if it's AI (which it would need to be as the males here in Alaska aren't quite my type of chow).

So much to consider before ever deciding to breed, you know?

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
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  #14  
Old 03-10-2007, 03:33 PM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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Originally Posted by anna84 View Post
Agility is outside the realm of everyday activities and dogs that compete just like human athletes who push themselves run a higher risk of being injured. GSD's that compete in Schutzund can break bones, pull muscles, and lose teeth. And owners who train their dogs that are in SAR definetely increase the potential for injury and death to their animals.

This isn't a critique of these activities at all. But I wanted to use them to point out that I'm sure that many of the people who take part in these things love their animals dearly. From everything you've said it seems like Khana's puppies would be a help to the Chow breed in general, plus they'd be adorable . But of course it's a difficult decision and theres no wrong answer.
You make a good point, but I have to say that I see it in a bit different way. Yes, I'm in favor of working titles. I don't like what I've seen happening in the agility world with dogs breaking down and having some major problems. I don't push my dogs that far. I have multiple agility titles on three dogs and none of them have been injured or have shown any lasting problems for it - but I also never drilled them hard or ran them weekend after weekend at trials. I wouldn't put my dogs in a dog sport at a level where they would be likely to sustain injury.

I think that if you're putting your dog in an activity that runs a high risk of injury or death then again, the same "criteria" may apply as to those who breed. There's a conscious choice on our part to put our animals into these situations and does that mean that we need to have a tad bit of objectivity in place of a bit of the bond? Or would we avoid these types of things if we had a really really REALLY deep bond?

I don't know the answer for sure, just using this as a topic of discussion .. *L* .. I know there are some choices I've made with Khana that could be interpreted as a bit harsh and yet I know how much she means to me.

After reading all these posts I'm sitting here wondering if part of my thoughts on breeding and bond have to do with concern over where to place puppies. I can see myself living with a whole litter of pups because I wouldn't find "appropriate" homes .. *LOL* .. not that the thought doesn't kind of sound fun!

Khana's a sweetie and is a great ambassador for the breed .. only time will tell if breeding her becomes the right thing to do. It won't devastate me if she's never bred.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
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  #15  
Old 03-10-2007, 03:35 PM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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tinies12, thanks .. loving my dogs is what I do best! *L*

Boemy, you're exaggerating my point and attributing words to my posts that weren't there. It's not that I said someone couldn't bond with a brood bitch. I said there's a certain amount of objectivity over emotionalism that probably needs to be there in order to handle the stress of putting your dog at a higher risk.

And comparing it to humans - while I can see why you did - is not really accurate either. The level of care we put into a human is much MUCH higher than what is typical for a dog. There are blood tests and sonograms and various other tests that are done as a matter of course. And the choice to produce a human baby is a choice made BY the humans, not by some other species who decided to put this human female with this human male to produce these human babies.

If we decide to breed our dogs, we are 100% responsible for what happens. As parents of grown children, we have to rely on the lessons we've taught them throughout their lives and hope that they make good decisions on their own.

It's just not a viable comparison to me.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
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  #16  
Old 03-11-2007, 09:18 AM
RedyreRottweilers
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A very interesting and thought provoking post, Mel.

I understand it down to my bones, having nearly lost the bitch on my last breeding to an ER section.

You can bet your boots I understand and have thought long and hard about the risks associated with breeding, ANY breeding. I know breeders who have lost bitches after doing EVERYTHING right. I just almost can't get my mind around the emotional consequences there would be for me should my Penny die from complications of whelping. Whelping that *I* caused to happen.

It is one reason I'm planning on using the WHELP WISE service on my future litters.
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  #17  
Old 03-11-2007, 03:03 PM
Purdue#1
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Originally Posted by shadowfacedanes View Post
I've never bred a dog, so I can't offer an answer, I just wanted to say WOW. Anyone ever considering breeding should read this to know how it should not be taken lightly.

I agree. people should be able to read it is easliy without having to go through a lot of pages(hint.hint)
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  #18  
Old 03-12-2007, 04:34 PM
StillandSilent StillandSilent is offline
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Let me preface this by saying I have never bred a dog and never plan to, but here is my opinion. She is your pet first and foremost. Not a brood dog or a champion, your pet. So if you are unsure at all, don't breed her. Let her live out her life as a pet. A dog should only be bred to better the breed, but just because she may better the breed, she doesn't absolutly have to be bred. (Did that make any sense outside of my head )

I'm sure you have thought about all this already, but if she were my dog, I wouldn't breed her, at least not right away. I also don't want this to sound like I don't think you would be breeding for the right reasons, because I know you would.
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  #19  
Old 03-13-2007, 04:32 AM
IliamnasQuest IliamnasQuest is offline
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Red - I think you understand well the point I was making (or at least asking about). It's a huge responsibility, making the decision to breed a bitch. Some people seem to do it so casually (as evidenced by breeders kicking out numerous litters a year). For me, it's much more emotional.

StillandSilent - I have NO plans to breed Khana any time soon. I'm just in the process of setting up the OFA x-rays and we'll go from there. Who knows, maybe something will come up that makes her "non-breedable" in my eyes. Right now, she's an absolute delight and definitely of a temperament much better than the typical chow. And she is very much my companion first (the spoiled little monster that she is .. *L*).

You know, it's tough .. some of the very characteristics that might make her a perfect choice for breeding are also the characteristics that make me so close to her that it becomes difficult to choose to breed. What a catch-22 it all becomes!

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
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