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  #11  
Old 10-06-2006, 01:00 AM
AnimalLoverCatRescuer AnimalLoverCatRescuer is offline
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I work in a lot of rescue situations so I always alter the animal no matter what the age before going to a new home. I think in rescue situations it is the best way to go. If a dog ended up unwanted in a shelter then you have to do everything possible to make sure the dog is altered and doesn't lead to more unwanted animals being born.

A good breeder I would think would try to establish a sort of relationship with the people who purchase their pups. That way they can keep up with them and remind them when to alter, they also usually require a contract to be signed agreeing to do it. Problem is that many people either decide they don't have the money, or they are just lazy and don't do it or they just aren't good at keeping their dog from getting loose and mating with another. With irresponsible breeders, they don't do follow ups to make sure the person alters the pet.

So it is really a tough call. I am more experienced with cats and I alter them all at 2 lb or 8 weeks or immediately after I get them. I don't think the same happens with them because I have personally and I know dozens of people who do pediatric altering with cats and they live healthy lives. I really think it is different in the case of cats. I am still learning about dogs. But I think dogs from the pounds and shelters should be altered before going home and the breeders don't have to do it but they should make sure the buyers do by a certain age.

I don't see anything wrong with spaying and neutering dogs at 6 months-1 year. Cats I would never ever wait that long because too many bad behaviors start by then and cancers and disease are prevented by altering BEFORE the first heat.
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  #12  
Old 10-06-2006, 10:04 AM
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I would rather see a breeder give a refund of a certain amount after proof of spaying/neutering.
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  #13  
Old 10-06-2006, 12:39 PM
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stevinski stevinski is offline
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- If the breed is so rare, then the more the better. Preventing breeding sounds like securing her market.
obviously not, just because its rare doesnt mean it should be overbred, especially since only a few will be breeding worthy, and i doupt shes trying to secure the market, more trying to secure the future of the breed

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- If her dogs are such high quality show animals, what is the chance of so many puppies being born which are so inferior that breeding from them would be "irresponsible"? Again it sounds like possible market protection.
because not every dog in a litter will be the highest of quality, and she doesnt want her puppies to be irresponsibly bred, he dogs may be high quality and if they are then they should be going to show homes

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- I was taught not to de-sex very young animals because it's important for health reasons to wait for their full adult development before removing their hormone supply.
i personally am fully for neutering and spaying at whatever age, i mean its better then having another litter in the world, that would just lead to more dogs dyin in shelters

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- It's not possible to really know what quality of adult will emerge from a puppy just a few weeks old, and therefore whether one might eventually want to breed from it. I hate the notion of making a premature decision about something so important.
exactly, you dont no if the dog is going to turn out, high quality or not, so spaying the dog wil just solve the problem, and besides that is quite wrong, show Prospects can normally be spotted by a breeder at a young age.

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- I hate the idea of leaving a puppy in a kennel for the majority of its most formative weeks - 7 to 16 - when I could be nurturing and teaching it so much in that time.
this is what most impress's me about the breeder, i mean any bad breeder is just going to want to get rid of the puppies as early as possible, and besides shes the breeder, she knows her breed, and shes sociallising the pups very well before they go to there new home

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What do you think???
find out a bit more about her breeding practices but at the moment to me she sems to be a amazingly responsible breeder
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  #14  
Old 10-06-2006, 12:43 PM
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I consider this very good practice on the breeders behalf. She's looking out for her dogs ultimate health and well being. Breeding should not be taken lightly by any means, and she's ensuring that it's left to those who truly know what they're doing. Good for her.
I completely agree, i mean why take the risk of a bad litter being bred, and i'm sure she doesnt de-sex all of the puppies because that would completely take away the reason for her breeding, but i really think she truly cares for her dogs
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  #15  
Old 10-06-2006, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by stevinski View Post
I completely agree, i mean why take the risk of a bad litter being bred, and i'm sure she doesnt de-sex all of the puppies because that would completely take away the reason for her breeding, but i really think she truly cares for her dogs
If we look back in time, lets say 20 yrs ago. When the Rottie was introduced into Canada and the USA. Well the price for a Pink papered dog was extensive. So with that everyone had to have one. So now people here in our two countries see $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. So now we do not practise the breeding skills as they do in Germany. Here there are no breed wardens.

So with that note the breed it self is being abused an ruined. This does not happen in Germany. There the breed warden servayed the dog and or dogs deemed to be bred together. If in which he /she states no these dogs do not provide the quaility required they then are not bred. Get caught breeding over there with out the breed wardens authority.see what happens.

Here it is made to easy to be able to breed. There are no rules and or regulations what so ever. Anyone from mutt breeder's (designer) dogs to the purebreds can just get bred.
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  #16  
Old 10-06-2006, 02:46 PM
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Boemy Boemy is offline
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I guess a breeder would have to ask themselves . . . "Is there a bigger chance of my dogs having health problems from early spay/neuter? Or is there a bigger chance of some idiot breeding a pet quality dog that I sell unspayed/unneutered?" And really, that's a question every breeder has to decide for themselves.

Personally, if I were a breeder, I would spay/neuter pet quality puppies before they left my care. People can give all the "right" answers to your questions and then turn out to be complete twits later. Dogs can get loose by accident. Or maybe that six month old labrador ends up dogsat by a moron who spontaneously decides that he'll breed her with a german shepherd, assuming the owner will be thrilled to sell "labrasheps".

Even if a dog's breeder can legally take it back if it's left unspayed, that won't "unmake" any puppies born in the meantime.

Now, I do agree that puppies should be raised in the home, not a kennel. Did this breeder actually say she raises puppies in a kennel or were you just assuming?
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  #17  
Old 10-07-2006, 12:18 PM
Chrissy&B Chrissy&B is offline
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Originally Posted by cindr View Post
So now we do not practise the breeding skills as they do in Germany. Here there are no breed wardens.

So with that note the breed it self is being abused an ruined. This does not happen in Germany. There the breed warden servayed the dog and or dogs deemed to be bred together. If in which he /she states no these dogs do not provide the quaility required they then are not bred. Get caught breeding over there with out the breed wardens authority.see what happens.
Yes, this is a common practice in not just Germany, but also over here in Slovenia and other European FCI countries .....I'm quite happy about that!
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