Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Dog Breeds


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 06-15-2014, 05:45 PM
Sekah's Avatar
Sekah Sekah is online now
The Monster.
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,147
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy View Post
I looked a bit at ES, they sound very nice too. I found a breeder in Oregon who's dogs I may go to see.

I don't need a dog that has an I LOVE EVERYONE attitude, and honestly, being politely reserved with strangers is completely fine with me.

I really like Creekside Border Collies (a working breeder), though they are super far away so I'd have to either fly there or have the puppy shipped.

Contact Point BCs look really nice too, though I'm not sure if going to a sports breeder for my first BC would be wise?
As much as I love border collies, I'm not sure that getting one with the expectation that it'd be okay with ~30-60 mins of exercise a day would be ideal... especially if it's your first dog. It's doable, but they're a breed with a great deal of quirkiness. Some dogs are stellar and steady and wonderful. Some are nervous OCD messes. For what it's worth, Creekside has a great reputation in the BC community. I'm not familiar with Contact Point but I don't think that a sports bred BC for your first dog is a good idea. If you're genuinely thinking about a BC as your dog, this is a great online community. Be warned, the community is founded on the basis of the working border collie. If you mention sport/show dogs, they'll let you know why they think you're wrong. http://www.bordercollie.org/boards/index.php?act=idx

When I read your OP I did think that a herding dog might be a good fit. I'm a herding breed nerd, so it's not uncommon to see 'your breed' when people describe what it is they're looking for. I have an Aussie as a sport/performance dog (out of pet/show lines). She's a firecracker and loads of fun. My last Aussie was my family dog and he was so laid back and relaxed. Aussies can be awesome, but more and more I'm seeing a lack of play drive/handler focus, and some members of the breed have quite the stubborn streak. Honestly, it again boils down to the individuals and the lines within the breed. Getting to know the sire/dam, the lines the breeder breeds from, etc will go a long way to helping you find exactly what you're looking for.

Or you can go to a shelter and find a cool ball-obsessed lab mix and have a great companion.
__________________

Cheynat's O' Lady Midnight CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh-S CGN HIC, Esq.
Megatron, Heat Vampire
Ci Da: Good Dog
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-15-2014, 07:21 PM
BostonBanker's Avatar
BostonBanker BostonBanker is online now
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 8,186
Default

I know a fair number of the Creekside dogs, and was in fact at a trial with at least four of them this weekend, including one run by the breeder. Every one I've known has been a fantastic dog, and I can't say enough good things about them. However, every one I've known has also been actively worked in agility and/or herding. I'm not sure if they would be as wonderfully delightful if they weren't well exercised mentally and physically (they may be, just can't say).

I agree that, while I think the border collie "oh my gosh they are so unique nobody can own them but me" mystique is a little over done, they may not be the ideal dog for someone looking for a great companion who will be fine on a moderate amount of exercise.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-19-2014, 05:24 PM
Sit Stay's Avatar
Sit Stay Sit Stay is offline
Not a Border Collie
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ontario
Posts: 2,800
Default

Just piping in to say that I would recommend being super up front about your exercise limitations if you go to an ES breeder (or any breeder really!) so that they can hopefully set you up with a suitable puppy. My ES would not be the type of dog to do well with 30-60 minutes a day, for instance. She does fine on 30-60 minutes a day of active training/hiking/playing, but that's coupled with her getting a few hours to poke around outside while we do farm chores every day. I think if those 30-60 minutes were her main time outside or interacting with us she'd get stir crazy pretty quickly. She has a fantastic off switch and is a super adaptable girl, but after a couple of days without doing something she gets a little sharp! However, there are lots of ES out there that are more easy going.

Also be aware that ESs should have a good bit of hunting instinct, so if you'd be disturbed by those small mammals maybe being dinner once in awhile, just be warned lol
__________________

Quinn - English Shepherd

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-19-2014, 05:53 PM
Laurelin's Avatar
Laurelin Laurelin is offline
I'm All Ears
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 29,227
Default

I know a few contact point dogs. Mostly I just notice flashy colors and petite build. They are pretty typical sporter collie, imo. Very high drive, very busy, reactive, super fast.

I know a lot of BCs and pretty much all of them are sports dogs. I really think most of them do need sports homes or homes that work them quite a bit.

I think you could find what you want in a much less intense dog.
__________________
Mia CGC - (5 year old papillon)
Summer TG3 TBAD - (10 year old papillon)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-20-2014, 04:11 PM
meepitsmeagan's Avatar
meepitsmeagan meepitsmeagan is offline
Meagan&TheCattleDogCrew
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Southwest Michigan
Posts: 2,467
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sekah View Post
When I read your OP I did think that a herding dog might be a good fit. I'm a herding breed nerd, so it's not uncommon to see 'your breed' when people describe what it is they're looking for. I have an Aussie as a sport/performance dog (out of pet/show lines). She's a firecracker and loads of fun. My last Aussie was my family dog and he was so laid back and relaxed. Aussies can be awesome, but more and more I'm seeing a lack of play drive/handler focus, and some members of the breed have quite the stubborn streak. Honestly, it again boils down to the individuals and the lines within the breed. Getting to know the sire/dam, the lines the breeder breeds from, etc will go a long way to helping you find exactly what you're looking for.

Or you can go to a shelter and find a cool ball-obsessed lab mix and have a great companion.
Add me to the herder-brain club. A few of your points did strike me for a herder. I will caution towards the exercise needs as well, however. Just be very honest with your breeder. You will have to watch prey drive with these guys though... just saying. IME, they will be attracted to all of the small animals. I know several live with small animals and are fine, but you get a squirrel running and you are going to have to have a decent recall.

Also, jobs are important to these dogs. So if you are just looking for a companion without giving them something specific to do it may not be the right fit. I know that is super helpful.

May be worth looking into a general or breed specific reputable herding breed rescue. I know it's a ways out, but HeRD of Wyoming is a great resource and they may have some leads for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sit Stay View Post
Also be aware that ESs should have a good bit of hunting instinct, so if you'd be disturbed by those small mammals maybe being dinner once in awhile, just be warned lol
Just emphasizing the prey drive again.

I have a Boxer as well (and have met PLENTY more). They weren't the first thing that popped into my mind while reading your description, but I don't think they are a bad fit persay.

They fit your bit of "judging strangers" pretty well. Mine is a pretty good judge of character. With that said, the socialization is super important. You want to make sure they meet several people and yadda yadda, otherwise you may end up with that instinct going the wrong way. They are definitely watchful of their home and she will alert to things that are weird long before my herder will.

They are loyal to their person. Even though I put all the training on my girl, she's my husband's dog through and through. She would do anything for him. She's kind of middle ground on velco-level (though you have to remember I live with ACD's my judgement may be off). She likes to be around, but doesn't HAVE to be. They are dogs that like to be doing things with you. She loves plowing snow in the winter with Josh. One of her favorite activities. Not super prone to SA, but it can happen.

She's not a wanderer at all. She likes to stick close to the house and to us when we go hiking. However, biddability isn't there. She will work for super awesome treats, but to just work because she wants to? Nah. Most Boxers I meet don't have the best recall, either... mine included. She's offleash if we are in a rural area because she stays close, but other than that she's on a lead. She's got no interest in small animals and no prey drive. Toy drive is something that is touch and go. I think most prefer tugging to fetch. I think your exercise limits are pretty reasonable for a Boxer if you go with the right lines. Health-wise, I'd definitely go with health tested lines. Dog reactivity is something to watch for in the breed, as well.

I know this is long winded. I'm sorry! Just trying to help. I think with the right moderate conformation, health tested line Boxer you would find a nice dog that fits most of your needs.
__________________


Harlow 2010 Boxer :: Rider 2012 ACDx :: Tulsa 2014 ACD

http://trailingcattle.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-21-2014, 09:14 AM
Cloudy Cloudy is offline
Active Pup
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 5
Default

Hi again After looking a bit more into BCs, I've decided they probably aren't my thing.

I took a few breed quizzes, but I don't think they were very...accurate.

Pedigree's gave me:
Shar-Pei (nope nope nope.)
Finnish Spitz (nope)
Australian Cattle Dog (probably not my thing)
Border Collie (already crossed out)
Bulldog (???..Why this suggestion.)
Canaan Dog (nope)
Cardigan Corgi (not a fan of dwarfed breeds)
Glen of Imaal Terrier (..no idea what this is)


Iam's:
Whippet (cool dogs, but there is a lot of things about them that don't make them ideal)
Staffordshire Bull Terrier (maybe? not sure if i want to deal with da)
Cirneco dell'Etna (no idea what that is)
Puli (looord no)
Basset Hound (nope)

SelectSmart's:
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (maybe?)
Polish Lowland Sheepdog (don't know anything about them)
Sussex Spaniel (nope)
Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen (nope)
German Pinscher (no)


I found the fact that Pedigree gave me a Shar-Pei really, really amusing.

I don't mind my dog getting a catch once in a while, but I don't want a dog that is always on alert barking at them or just getting spooked by it.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-21-2014, 08:37 PM
Romy's Avatar
Romy Romy is offline
Taxiderpy
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 9,954
Default

What about a collie collie? Like a rough or smooth collie? It sounds like smooth is something you'd be more into. They have herder brains, but are more of an all around good farm dog type that can be just as happy being a family companion or working stock.

They will also totally alert you to people. lol

Some are more varmint oriented than others. I know of some that will get possums. But then a lot of them aren't bothered by squirrels and stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-22-2014, 11:05 AM
Laurelin's Avatar
Laurelin Laurelin is offline
I'm All Ears
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 29,227
Default

Toller might be a good option....
__________________
Mia CGC - (5 year old papillon)
Summer TG3 TBAD - (10 year old papillon)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:11 PM.


©1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site