Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > The Dog Breeds


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-23-2013, 03:55 PM
Dogdragoness's Avatar
Dogdragoness Dogdragoness is offline
<------ CLAIM! ^_^
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Gillett/San Antonio TX
Posts: 3,630
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saeleofu View Post
Gee, thanks


Anyway, well socialized, adjusted, and trained dogs should be able to handle pretty much anything life throws at them. Even us annoying autistic people I was at the river the other night and a little kid comes up out of nowhere and bear hugs Logan. Logan's reaction? Wagging his tail, kissing the kid, and generally enjoy the crap out of it.
I'm sorry but I don't recall using the word "annoying".

Anyway it's more the parent/guardians fault for not mediating interactions btw ANY child, special needs or not & a dog, I was just making sure this didn't happen here. For the dogs sake because let's face it the dog is the one who always loses.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-23-2013, 04:12 PM
Kat09Tails's Avatar
Kat09Tails Kat09Tails is offline
*Now with Snark*
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Upper Left hand corner, USA
Posts: 3,352
Default

So much depends on the kid and what you expect out of the dog. There are some spectrum kids I have met who aren't safe around babies, kids smaller than themselves, or small animals. Are these kids the majority, nope, but that is the reality sometimes of having a kid on the spectrum. I know several autistic kids who have family pets quite successfully and several families where they had to get rid of or alter how the kept the family pet because their kid and family couldn't handle how their pet or child dealt with each other. I remember one family who couldn't get their kid to leave the cat box alone so the cat became an outside cat, and another whose kid started pulling/plucking their dog's fur at every opportunity - they rehomed the dog to an Aunt. I remember one family whose family dog just steadily became more and more fearful of the random loud noises and movements of their kid and eventually they did PTS the dog which caused some big problems in the family with their other children.

I guess my question would be what do you want out of the dog? What do you envision your life with your dog and your kid to be like? Is this an assistance dog or just a pet? How does your kid handle being around animals now? Do they have normal or neutral interactions with them? Are you prepared to mediate those interactions?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-23-2013, 04:19 PM
Dogdragoness's Avatar
Dogdragoness Dogdragoness is offline
<------ CLAIM! ^_^
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Gillett/San Antonio TX
Posts: 3,630
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat09Tails View Post
So much depends on the kid and what you expect out of the dog. There are some spectrum kids I have met who aren't safe around babies, kids smaller than themselves, or small animals. Are these kids the majority, nope, but that is the reality sometimes of having a kid on the spectrum. I know several autistic kids who have family pets quite successfully and several families where they had to get rid of or alter how the kept the family pet because their kid and family couldn't handle how their pet or child dealt with each other. I remember one family who couldn't get their kid to leave the cat box alone so the cat became an outside cat, and another whose kid started pulling/plucking their dog's fur at every opportunity - they rehomed the dog to an Aunt. I remember one family whose family dog just steadily became more and more fearful of the random loud noises and movements of their kid and eventually they did PTS the dog which caused some big problems in the family with their other children.

I guess my question would be what do you want out of the dog? What do you envision your life with your dog and your kid to be like? Is this an assistance dog or just a pet? How does your kid handle being around animals now? Do they have normal or neutral interactions with them? Are you prepared to mediate those interactions?
That's what I mean, the pet/dog always is the one who suffers, I just don't want this to become another statistic ... As someone who deals in rescue & has volunteered at shelters ever since I was old enough, you can understand why stories like this are maddening
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:38 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site