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  #31  
Old 01-03-2013, 09:24 AM
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Danefied Danefied is offline
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Eh... for S&G try the MSM and add in some Coconut oil too - it's not going to hurt anything, it's relatively cheap, both also aid with digestion, not just skin, and if it doesn't work, your other dogs will love it. Hell, if you get human grade MSM instead of feed store stuff, you can take it, and the coconut oil makes for awesome stir fries.
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  #32  
Old 01-03-2013, 09:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danefied View Post
Eh... for S&G try the MSM and add in some Coconut oil too - it's not going to hurt anything, it's relatively cheap, both also aid with digestion, not just skin, and if it doesn't work, your other dogs will love it. Hell, if you get human grade MSM instead of feed store stuff, you can take it, and the coconut oil makes for awesome stir fries.
I like the way you think.
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  #33  
Old 01-03-2013, 10:11 AM
~Tucker&Me~ ~Tucker&Me~ is offline
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It sucks you are having such bad issues with the poor guy. Spy had a lot of skin, allergy and gastro issues until I switched him to raw. So far so good, but I always worry about going back to square one and having to deal with those symptoms again.

Good luck.
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  #34  
Old 01-03-2013, 02:46 PM
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~WelshStump~ ~WelshStump~ is offline
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Honestly, I won't press the "holistic" vet idea on you at all, because I finally broke down and went that route with Jinj, spent over $300, one month later he got so bad he chewed open one of his back feet blood all over. After that I looked around his diet some more, and concluded he must now have a beef allergy too, since taking it out of his diet (minus his christmas present) his eyes aren't as bad and the redness has dulled from his feet, but he's still gagging and licking. Here's a pic from late last month where you can see the one spot on a front foot he wont leave alone just to give an idea (and you can see his runny eye stains still):


Another thing too, in the new photo's he actually looks a lot like what Noodle gets every spring, his vet said it was a grass/pollen allergy, honestly if that's the case, it's in the environment and not his diet, good luck, there's really not a lot you can do anyway for them except move to a different location, and that's not a guarantee either.

Not to be so negative on the subject, really, but I've been there, still live there, and I really wish I had an option for you! Best thing I can come up with, put him on a new very limited ingredient diet for just one month and see what happens. Just found out while looking up canned food options (I can only get beef, chicken, or turkey to cook my own foods) Canine Caviar sells a Beaver formula, heck, you never know!
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  #35  
Old 01-03-2013, 03:02 PM
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If you haven't tried it yet, I would go with a raw diet, and a single, novel protein, something he's not likely had before and just that. In Canada there is Carnivora that does patties, not sure what there is in the states, but for cases like this that's usually what we end up working on - they get something like rabbit or elk that they'd not had before, no treats, no supplements, just that, and see. If that doesn't work they try a different meat, same thing, see how it goes after a month or two. Then slowly add in other meats and ingredients to find what works and what doesn't work.

A lot of kibbles you're hoping the company doesn't screw up ingredients, or forgets to clean the machines or whatever, and they have a lot of ingredients, so that doesn't help either.

Just food for thought, poor guy! I know the one holistic vet also will have the dogs do a course of cortisone etc. as needed to get the issues under control while changing, then wean off in hopes the diet prevents the cycle from continuing.
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  #36  
Old 01-03-2013, 07:00 PM
crazedACD crazedACD is offline
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I like the idea of the suit, though I was thinking about bulldogs and clothing and wondering if that wouldn't work out too well, haha.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SevenSins View Post
Crazed, do you happen to have any specific brand recommendations by any chance? One thing that none of my vets can figure out is why every time these allergies flare up like this, he becomes next to impossible to keep weight on, so far regardless of which food he's on. It's hard to tell body condition in the photo I posted, but although he's nowhere close to emaciated (he's teetered on it a couple times in the past), he has a lot of muscle wasting and his heavy, thick skin tends to A-frame over his spine. I've tried several types of food, ranging from 5-6 star brands on dogfood analysis.com (Instinct, Blue Wilderness), to intentionally testing him on lower quality, lower protein food (Diamond) because some Bulldogs just don't process higher protein well. Surprisingly didn't make a lick of difference as far as weight or condition on either end of the spectrum, and he required around the same quantity of food per day just to maintain what little weight I can keep on him. However, when he's on something that causes his allergies to subside...he practically becomes an "air fern."
Instinct is tapioca based which is definitely high glycemic index, Blue Wilderness is potato based which is high as well. I went with a local brand for the pug, a lamb and oatmeal based kibble (oatmeal is low GI). Raw, or raw patties would be low to no GI. Oatmeal, barley, beans, and such are low GI.

http://www.gripetfoods.com/CertifiedDogFoods.htm

Nutrisca might be a good option to try. Orijen would be fine too depending on what you want to spend trying it out. I don't think you will wholly be able to control the environmental allergies with food, but perhaps can kind of stem those secondary infections.
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  #37  
Old 01-03-2013, 07:17 PM
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PWCorgi PWCorgi is offline
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Canine Caviar is low glycemic, one starch source and one protein. There's barely anything in it. It's pricey but it might be worth a try.

I'm sorry you're having to deal with this
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  #38  
Old 04-13-2013, 02:04 PM
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MoparStar MoparStar is offline
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Default have him screened for autoimmune disease

You will likely need to have this done at university level. When I see over the top allergens like you describe, especially considering his breed in which AID is common, it is the first thing Ithink of. Your dog may not show classic symptoms. However AID can manifest in many atypical ways. Often affected dogs have NO actual allergies, their immune system and amino acid levels are so out of whack tht EVERYTHING triggers an immune (allergic) response. Treatment varies. With my dog a short course of steroids and immunosupressants combined with replacing the deficient amino acids resolved her years long issue with no recurrence in over 5 years. The deficient amino acid replacement is lifelong, but they are cheap and OTC at any pharmacy or health store. University level screening ican be pricy but so is continually trying new things that do not work. Good luck.
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