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  #61  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Bahamutt99 View Post
...nor do I consider it to be truly threatened.
The DOG was feeling threatened, though. And was saying so over and over again.
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  #62  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:22 PM
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Honestly I'd have the dog put down.

Here that wouldn't fly in my house and me the dog and the .22 would be taking a nice long walk to the back of the property. But that's just me. I don't put up with aggression towards people in my house. I do own a Rottweiler that is protective, and a Cur that is shall we say has quirks. Hell Beau used to be VERY FA, but a few CTJM put an end to that.

Dogs that will bite more then once shouldn't be alive. It's not worth that risk. But I have a "Pit Bull" mind.

But that's just me and my opinion, seeing how I have an 8 year old nephew and a 2 day old nephew.
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  #63  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:26 PM
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But I think the point is, how many of us realistically would have pushed the dog to the point of biting in that moment vs. finding a different way to address the RG other than staring down and physically intimidating the dog? IMO the bite was a direct result of the technique, not a foregone conclusion.

I don't know, I personally find RG a relatively easy problem to manage and address. It just seems like such an odd thing to euthanize a dog over to me.
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  #64  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:31 PM
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This dog is not starting any of the confrontation. It's only reacting because there is this stranger getting all up in its face, staring a hole through her, looming over her and sticking his hands in her food dish. She's giving tons of signs to him to back the eff off. She averts her eyes. She growls. Licks her lips. Warning air snaps. He just keeps on and keeps on. Then puts his hand over her muzzle and then she bites.

If he would have stopped when she gave him appropriate warning signs instead of needing to prove he was alpha (or what other nonsense), he wouldn't have gotten bitten. It's because people keep pushing a dog past growling and air snapping (which are normal dog communication tools) that they end up biting. I know, that's how I've been bitten before. It's not Nikki's fault that I was ignoring every 'please stop' known to dog before I got bitten. He is teaching the dog that she needs to continue escalating because obviously her appeasement gestures aren't working.

I shouldn't have watched that. It got me angry.
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  #65  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by sassafras View Post
But I think the point is, how many of us realistically would have pushed the dog to the point of biting in that moment vs. finding a different way to address the RG other than staring down and physically intimidating the dog? IMO the bite was a direct result of the technique, not a foregone conclusion.

I don't know, I personally find RG a relatively easy problem to manage and address. It just seems like such an odd thing to euthanize a dog over to me.
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Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
This dog is not starting any of the confrontation. It's only reacting because there is this stranger getting all up in its face, staring a hole through her, looming over her and sticking his hands in her food dish. She's giving tons of signs to him to back the eff off. She averts her eyes. She growls. Licks her lips. Warning air snaps. He just keeps on and keeps on. Then puts his hand over her muzzle and then she bites.

If he would have stopped when she gave him appropriate warning signs instead of needing to prove he was alpha (or what other nonsense), he wouldn't have gotten bitten. It's because people keep pushing a dog past growling and air snapping (which are normal dog communication tools) that they end up biting. I know, that's how I've been bitten before. It's not Nikki's fault that I was ignoring every 'please stop' known to dog before I got bitten. He is teaching the dog that she needs to continue escalating because obviously her appeasement gestures aren't working.

I shouldn't have watched that. It got me angry.
Exactly!

For those saying they would PTS if this was there dog....if this was your dog I would say shame on you for causing it. THIS dog was pushed into becoming this defensive and biting.

And yes, I have PTS a resource guarder before.....and I kick myself all the time that I didnt deal with it the way I now know to. I pushed and fought him all the way and he ended up guarding way more than just food. He had other issues as well so it wasnt JUST the RG that made my mind up but still.....
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  #66  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:42 PM
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Our Bedlington Terrier was a resource guarder on par with that dog. We had him 15 years, starting when I was 10. He had exactly one bite, and it was someone who didn't know him (he got a...used personal hygiene product...out of the trash can, and she tried to grab it back from him). One bite in 15 years. Because when he had something he was allowed to have, but guarded, we left him the heck alone. And when he got something he wasn't allowed to have, we traded him.

We probably could have trained it out of him if we'd known better. But we simply found an easy way we could all live with it, and everyone was fine. It isn't rocket science.

Would I have that dog in the house with a toddler? Probably not. But they had an infant, right? So a year or so in which they could have done the training before the kid was really mobile and it was going to be an issue. My friend took in a dog for evaluation from the humane society, because the dog was resource guarding. Darn if within about 3 weeks, that dog wasn't picking up everything she could find and carrying it to whichever person was closest, in hopes that they would please please offer to trade with her for a cookie. Shoes. Toys. Socks. Anything on the floor, she'd carry up to you, parade back and forth, shoving it in your lap and woo-wooing.
Again, not rocket science.
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  #67  
Old 09-19-2012, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danefied;
...its still not pleasant to be treated like this.
Treated like what? Pointing out reciprocating smugness in your tone as you indicate to Katy that she sounds smug? We learned the golden rule in grade school, yo.

As for this dog, I would never have let it get this far. But I doubt people call Cesar as a first option. Most likely, the owners had no idea how to deal with this behavior. Not everybody has two brain cells in their head when it comes to dogs. In a world where people put prong collars on baby puppies, it's not surprising that a dog acting as badly as this needs a televised expert.
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  #68  
Old 09-19-2012, 09:49 PM
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I keep thinking of something that happened when I was in high school. There was this guy harassing me. At first I asked him nicely to 'please leave me alone'. He didn't and kept on. 'Go away'. He kept on. 'Get the **** away from me.' He didn't. So... I slugged him darn good and made him bleed. He finally left me alone.

I see this situation with the dog as similar. How many times does the dog have to say 'go away'? She tries nicely at first. Then a little more forcefully. Then eventually resorts to force.
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  #69  
Old 09-20-2012, 12:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Bahamutt99 View Post
The smug calling the smug smug. Uh, wait...

Yeah, I had my roll over this video on Facebook. I don't consider what this dog did to be an inhibited bite, nor do I consider it to be truly threatened. The last thing I see before the big bite is Cesar stopping and not doing anything. My response to things like this is purely visceral in nature. Cesar may not handle things the way many would want them handled, but I think that dog is way beyond and I wouldn't put up with it. At that point, it would be coming to Jesus to see the light or there would be no light at all.

And yes, I have walked the walk. With beautiful, promising, young dogs. I may not have done it over food aggression, but if one of my dogs had attacked a person in this manner, with the stimulus presented in this video, it would be enough for me. I would feel a huge liability owning such a dog.

Some of you might remember the "Fido" thread about a "friend's" dog. Yeah, I was talking about my own dog. And yes, she lives. Under tremendous pressure to control her mouth. But I came close. Homie don't play that. Had her last incident been a lucid bite and not an "oops, I missed," there would have been no question.
This.
I don't know how many people on this forum have children but I do . If a dog of mine did this to a human being it would be dead. Period.
I don't think anything that Katy said was smug. She was giving her opinion which is exactly what forums are specifically created for.
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  #70  
Old 09-20-2012, 12:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Muttkip View Post
Honestly I'd have the dog put down.

Here that wouldn't fly in my house and me the dog and the .22 would be taking a nice long walk to the back of the property. But that's just me. I don't put up with aggression towards people in my house. I do own a Rottweiler that is protective, and a Cur that is shall we say has quirks. Hell Beau used to be VERY FA, but a few CTJM put an end to that.

Dogs that will bite more then once shouldn't be alive. It's not worth that risk. But I have a "Pit Bull" mind.

But that's just me and my opinion, seeing how I have an 8 year old nephew and a 2 day old nephew.
Thankfully some people are of sound mind enough to believe this^^
Not so much in another forum I was part of *cough*
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