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  #1  
Old 07-23-2012, 03:41 PM
Dr. Zombie Snakes Dr. Zombie Snakes is offline
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Default New Breeders - Good or Bad?

I've been researching Japanese Akitas for several years - in fact, pretty much about as long as I've had Lobo, which is about four years. I want my own Akita Inu puppy, but this won't happen for a few years into the future.

Still, because I would still like to develop a relationship with a breeder, I have been looking. Because these dogs are so rare, it's been incredibly difficult to find a breeder near me. Through the Japanese Akita clubs (AKIHO and JACA), I have found a breeder that really appeals to me.

She does health testing.
She plans to sleep in the same room as the pups/mom, and socialize early.
The two dogs that she plans to breed next year come from nice lines.
She's knowledgeable about the breed.
They breed one breed(Japanese Akitas).
Her dogs are both outdoor and indoor dogs(they get outdoor time, as well as indoor time with the family).
She does allow home-visits to see the dogs and the puppies.
She has a waiting list, and it is NOT first come first serve. She has a questionnaire that she requires potential buyers to fill out so she can best place the puppy.
Because she lives in another state(there are no breeders in my state), I would have to go and pick up the puppy. IF the puppy was to be sent by plane, the puppy doesn't leave until twelve weeks. Otherwise, puppies are sold at eight to ten weeks old. Depending on how comfortable she is with their temperaments, they may stay longer.
She does spay and neuter before the puppies are sent to homes. She feels very strongly about spaying a female before her first heat. This is the only area that I disagree with her on, but I'm not educated in spaying/neutering. I've heard things from all sides of the argument, so I'm not really sure.
She WILL stand by her dogs if they need to be given back for any reason. So, yes, she will take back any puppies.

Other than the spay/neuter deal, the only other issue I have, is that she is new. She was going to have her first litter this year, but her female contracted Pyrometra and had to be spayed. SO, her first litter will be next year.

She does have a website, but the Facebook is updated more frequently.

Website: http://www.kaijukennels.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels?ref=ts
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Old 07-26-2012, 11:03 PM
Teal Teal is offline
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From the sounds of it, she is going to do everything responsibly.

My only question would be, how long has she owned the breed? If she just imported a few dogs in the last year or two and now wants to breed, I would be wary. But sometimes people are in a breed for a number of years before taking the plunge into breeding.

Even still... all breeders have to start somewhere! If you like her dogs, and are comfortable with everything aside from the fact that this is her first litter... then go for it.

(I don't personally like pediatric spay/neuters because of the health issues that can result, but I wouldn't be buying a pet dog from a breeder anyways)
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Old 07-26-2012, 11:07 PM
Saeleofu Saeleofu is offline
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Sounds pretty good. I don't like the pediatric spay-neuter bit and that would probably make it a no for me, but on the other hand there are a LOT of stupid and deceptive people in this world and I can't blame her for wanting to protect her lines and prevent BYB litters.

The other thing I would ask about is Early Neurological Stimulation. I don't think I'll ever use a breeder that doesn't do it.
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Old 07-26-2012, 11:36 PM
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Linds Linds is offline
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Everything up to the pediatric spay and neuter sounds fine to me if you're comfortable in it. The altering before they leave thing would have me running for the door faster than you can blink. But that's me. Just remember that it's permanent so I would make sure you are 100% comfortable with it before doing so.

And since you said you aren't educated on risks vs benefits of early altering here's a link to read that might give some perspective http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf

You could try talking to her about your concerns about altering that young, since she's a soon to be new breeder she's probably figuring all this out too.

I would also talk to people with dogs from her dogs breeders and hear what they're like. Since she's never bred before you can't talk to puppy buyers so go to her source and find out what you can through those people. Hopefully where she got her dogs from have established lines and people who've gotten dogs from them that you can speak to.

But anyways, the main thing when looking for a breeder is really decide what YOU want in them rather than everything you read you SHOULD want in them. Sometimes you gotta compromise on things so figure out what your hard line is. For me it would be the altering, for you it might be something different.
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Old 07-27-2012, 01:17 AM
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CharlieDog CharlieDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linds View Post
Everything up to the pediatric spay and neuter sounds fine to me if you're comfortable in it. The altering before they leave thing would have me running for the door faster than you can blink. But that's me. Just remember that it's permanent so I would make sure you are 100% comfortable with it before doing so.

And since you said you aren't educated on risks vs benefits of early altering here's a link to read that might give some perspective http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf
To me, this is a red flag. To you, it might not be. But I would definitely pass on that.
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Old 07-27-2012, 07:54 PM
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Being a novice or beginner is not necessarily a bad thing. She sounds like she has put a lot of research into responsible breeding and she wants to do everything right. Her lack of experience could affect her ability to grade a litter for show prospects but if she has a good eye for a dog then she may not have any trouble.

I agree with the others who oppose pediatric spay/neuter. My personal thoughts are, if a breeder doesn't trust a buyer to have it done at a more appropriate age then why are they letting them have a puppy in the first place?
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Old 07-31-2012, 02:17 AM
Dr. Zombie Snakes Dr. Zombie Snakes is offline
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Thank you to everyone who replied! <3

I think, since I'm not planning on buying a puppy for a few years anyway, I'll just speak to the people who buy from her and ask them about their dogs. And as someone else suggested, I'll also see if I can find others who have bought dogs from her dogs' lines and talk to them.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:20 AM
Dr. Zombie Snakes Dr. Zombie Snakes is offline
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Okay, this is an update.

I talked to other Akita owners and other Akita breeders, and apparently, Claire(the new breeder) is actually pretty recommended. She just had her first litter in October, so that's pretty exciting. She posts up daily photos, she posts pictures with the puppies at the vets, she even has a puppycam so we can watch the little puppies grow and stuff.

Anyway, I learned that it's not uncommon for Akita breeders to do pediatric spay/neuter. From all the owners and breeders I spoke with, the only problems that they've had are with growth, but that it didn't effect their joints. (These are also people who are EXTREMELY knowledgeable about nutrition, so perhaps that also plays a role in the lack of effect?) The only real behaviorial differences, were that pediatric spay/neuter seemed to make the females less likely to have SSA.

However, because I plan on entering my dog in sports, that does really worry me, even though I feel as though my dog's diet would be the best that I could give her. Perhaps with my sport-prospect I will look for another breeder, but I think I still may buy from her and use that dog for something that won't put too much pressure on joints(perhaps therapy dog work?).

Thank you everyone for all your help. (:
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  #9  
Old 12-23-2012, 11:07 PM
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chloe008 chloe008 is offline
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I notice this thread has something to do with new breeders, let me share some useful info. when it comes to pet neutering. According to an article people who have pets wanted their pets spayed or neutered, but when they find out how much it costs, they think it won't be possible. But it absolutely is possible—there are many shelters, veterinarians, and organizations who are ready and able to help. And it can be easy to find them.
Now, if you still need help, we've got more suggestions.
1. Visit some website on the Internet to see if there is a state or national group that will help you out.
2. Call your local humane society or animal shelter and tell them you are looking for low-cost spay/neuter services.
3. Talk to your veterinarian. You might be able to work out payment arrangements.
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Old 12-24-2012, 12:54 PM
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Keechak Keechak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chloe008 View Post
I notice this thread has something to do with new breeders, let me share some useful info. when it comes to pet neutering. According to an article people who have pets wanted their pets spayed or neutered, but when they find out how much it costs, they think it won't be possible. But it absolutely is possible—there are many shelters, veterinarians, and organizations who are ready and able to help. And it can be easy to find them.
Now, if you still need help, we've got more suggestions.
1. Visit some website on the Internet to see if there is a state or national group that will help you out.
2. Call your local humane society or animal shelter and tell them you are looking for low-cost spay/neuter services.
3. Talk to your veterinarian. You might be able to work out payment arrangements.
No offence but I don't think the OP has any trouble with affording to neuter their future dog. She was concerned that the breeder in question will be neutering the puppies young and that's it.
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