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Old 06-04-2012, 05:04 PM
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Default Most "intuitive" guardy dog

Of course, everyone has a special connection with their dogs in individual unique ways. But my personal "fantasy" guard dog is one that picks up on when I'm nervous/uneasy immediately, is able to pinpoint the source of my uneasiness, and actively be wary of it/protect me against it. Of course all dogs expected to be used as actively guardy ones should be properly trained and taught as to HOW they are desired to protect whatever it is they should be protecting. But through everyone's experience here...what is the most basically "intuitive" guardy breed that you have come across and that has instincts to pick up on something that you perceive as a threat?

I've heard Caucasian Ovcharka, Filas, and Akitas to be highly sensitive to their owners feelings/reactions to things in their surroundings, and accurately and readily reactive to them.

Also, do you think that if these guard dogs are expected to be active working guards that socializing them too much can be detrimental to their protective ability?

My kuvasz is perhaps abit too young/overly socialized (lol) to know what exactly a threat is yet other than the mailman and strange cars in the drive - when I tense up/get abit uncomfortable due to something in the environment - she doesn't flinch or take much notice. She's low aggression in a urban environment so I'm certainly not complaining. and her protective instincts have yet to fully kick in - so, yeah. We're just going thru basic puppy obedience, continuing socialization, and basic commands now.
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:10 PM
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My RR does pretty well and he has no formal guard training
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:16 PM
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My Bouviers have been pretty protective when needed. Same with my little Westie Terrier.

My next breed will either be a Cane Corso or a Boerboel and boht those breeds can be pretty protective and intuitive.

Mitsu my 7 month old Pit bull cross Tosa Inu, really has no protective insticts as of yet but she is still a pup. It will be interesting to see if the Tosa comes out more as she matures.
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Old 06-05-2012, 03:19 PM
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There is no such thing as an overly socialized Fila. It won't "ruin" their guarding instincts; it hones their judgment as to what is and is not normal human behavior.

BUT . . . an owner who is prone to being anxious or fearful, especially someone who wants a dog to react on the basis of his or her feelings of fear or anxiety is absolutely the wrong person to try to handle a Fila.
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Old 06-05-2012, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Renee750il View Post
There is no such thing as an overly socialized Fila. It won't "ruin" their guarding instincts; it hones their judgment as to what is and is not normal human behavior.

BUT . . . an owner who is prone to being anxious or fearful, especially someone who wants a dog to react on the basis of his or her feelings of fear or anxiety is absolutely the wrong person to try to handle a Fila.
This. All of it. Except apply it to all breeds.
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Old 06-05-2012, 04:20 PM
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This. All of it. Except apply it to all breeds.
Agreed!!
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Old 06-06-2012, 08:56 AM
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Needless to say, although I'll state it anyways, when considering any guardian-type breed, genetics, socialization, training, and suitability of owners, are each of tremendous importance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephyMei1112 View Post
I've heard Caucasian Ovcharka, Filas, and Akitas to be highly sensitive to their owners feelings/reactions to things in their surroundings, and accurately and readily reactive to them.
The old grey Akita, she ain't what she used to be. But if I were a misanthropic, old coot (as opposed to being just a plain old coot), a well-bred Fila or C.O. or, better still, three (for me, that's the magic number) Fila's or Ovcharka's, would be ideal.


Quote:
Originally Posted by StephyMei1112 View Post
But my personal "fantasy" guard dog is one that picks up on when I'm nervous/uneasy immediately, is able to pinpoint the source of my uneasiness, and actively be wary of it/protect me against it.
What you're kind of describing is our BRT.
"Kind of", as our BRT will always identify that potential threat long before I, or anyone else, is aware of it.

For:
- a "normal" lifestyle, with visitors to the home of all sizes and ages (and many with no dog sense at all),
- a life style which involves taking your dog(s) out with you to different social situations,
- and assuming we are relying on the dog's natural instinct (as opposed to being specifically PP-trained),
I see few equals to a well-bred *BRT
(*and, as in many guardian-type breeds, most we see today are not particularly well-bred ... IMO).

If one preferred more of a visual deterrent as well (as a well-groomed BRT is uncontrollably approachable until/unless in protection mode), a well-bred Rottie would be a gr8 choice.



Quote:
Originally Posted by StephyMei1112 View Post
Also, do you think that if these guard dogs are expected to be active working guards that socializing them too much can be detrimental to their protective ability?
Absolutely not!!!
IMO, the better the socialization, the better the guarding ability. Socialization will not only bolster a dog's confidence in strange situations with strange people, but will allow for better reading of various situations, so that the dog better realizes what is, and what is not, a real threat.

But then again, I'm speaking of actual protectiveness, and not simply aggression due to bad nerves.
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Old 06-06-2012, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StephyMei1112 View Post
My kuvasz is perhaps abit too young/overly socialized (lol) to know what exactly a threat is yet other than the mailman and strange cars in the drive - when I tense up/get abit uncomfortable due to something in the environment - she doesn't flinch or take much notice. She's low aggression in a urban environment so I'm certainly not complaining. and her protective instincts have yet to fully kick in - so, yeah. We're just going thru basic puppy obedience, continuing socialization, and basic commands now.
How old is she? All of the breeds you mentioned are slow to mature. Most of them won't reliably protect (if at all, because all dogs are individuals) until 2 years old at least.

Also, kuvasz and other LGDs are independent. They aren't going to look to YOU for cues that there's danger about. If you get anxious, they're going to glance around, and if there's nothing wrong they're going to roll their eyes at you or give you a condescending pat on the head. If there is something to worry about, then they'll worry about it regardless of how aware or oblivious you are.

I don't think you can over socialize a kuvasz. From what I understand, most of their defensive instincts are active when they're on home turf vs. going out and about. It makes them a lot easier to take places like the vet and out in public for sure.

When you tense up and get worried, what kinds of threats are you perceiving? Are they real? Is someone climbing your fence with weapon? Or are you just feeling generally anxious?

Coming from someone who long struggled with anxiety issues, one of the least useful things for an anxious person is a reactive/guardy dog that makes it's own judgements based on your emotional state. I tried training a German shepherd as a service dog for me. That was a massive FAIL.

That dog was so in tune I'd get anxious and she'd feed right off of it. She wanted so badly to make me happy, help me feel safe, and be a good dog that she decided on her own that X thing in the environment was making me anxious (in reality I was just anxious and it had nothing to do with the joggers, or people visiting, or the doves in the back yard, or the stray cats, etc.). She became extremely reactive to a lot of random things that had nothing to do with anything because she decided on her own that those things were the threats. We ended up rehoming her (she was a foster anyway and we were a really bad fit) with a nice older couple that had a nice stable older shepherd. Within a week she was a totally different dog.

With LGDs, their default is to assume everything is a threat. By socializing them you're teaching them about a lot of things that are not threats, and this makes them safer and happier.
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Old 06-06-2012, 11:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HayleyMarie View Post
My Bouviers have been pretty protective when needed. Same with my little Westie Terrier.

My next breed will either be a Cane Corso or a Boerboel and boht those breeds can be pretty protective and intuitive.

Mitsu my 7 month old Pit bull cross Tosa Inu, really has no protective insticts as of yet but she is still a pup. It will be interesting to see if the Tosa comes out more as she matures.
a tosa is NOT a guard dog. it is a match dog. if the tosa comes out you're going to have 100# plus of red hot highly DA fighting machine.
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StephyMei1112 View Post
...But my personal "fantasy" guard dog is one that picks up on when I'm nervous/uneasy immediately, is able to pinpoint the source of my uneasiness, and actively be wary of it/protect me against it...
Believe it or not, that describes the black Lab I had as a teen. Most times he picked up on something/someone not being right before we did, tho.
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