Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dog Health Care


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-06-2012, 12:54 PM
Back40 Back40 is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 73
Default Elevated food/water bowls...Pros/Cons?

What are the pro and cons of providing food and water from elevated bowls? I currently provide both from elevated bowls but a new foster, who is smaller by about 4 inches than my other 3 mix breeds, coughs after drinking. It appears he is coughing to expell air. I just read a thread about bloat and am concerned. Thanks for your advice!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-06-2012, 01:00 PM
SaraB SaraB is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 5,673
Default

There is no evidence supporting the theory that elevated bowls reduce the risk of bloat. Bloat has a number of possible contributing factors but the main one seems to be stress. Aside from that, for some dogs it is uncomfortable to reach all the way to the ground to eat and drink. For their sake it is a good idea to use elevated dishes.

My first dane was one of those that didn't really want to reach down to the ground, we elevated for him. My second dane currently eats and drinks off the floor without any problems.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-06-2012, 01:02 PM
katielou's Avatar
katielou katielou is offline
Slave to the Aussie
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,224
Default

I am not really aware of any proven benefits.
For us its convenience for me
__________________
"If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence, try orderin' somebody else's dog around."
- cowboy wisdom
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-06-2012, 05:47 PM
SarahHound's Avatar
SarahHound SarahHound is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: North West Scotland
Posts: 3,120
Default

It's very mixed, using elevated bowls. I bought them 4 years ago, as someone told me they were better for greyhounds. I've not had any problems before or after. I use them because I think they look more comfortable for the dogs to eat from.
__________________

My Photos
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-06-2012, 08:12 PM
JustaLilBitaLuck's Avatar
JustaLilBitaLuck JustaLilBitaLuck is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,921
Default

Missy has an elevated food dish simply because it keeps the bowl in one place. She's an enthusiastic eater, and chased the bowl all over the kitchen while she was eating, making a terrible mess.
__________________
Megan
| Jack - Lhasa Apso | Missy - Rottweiler | Heidi - Cocker Spaniel | Sassy - Siamese | Emmy & Oscar - Parakeets |
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-06-2012, 08:19 PM
Fran101's Avatar
Fran101 Fran101 is online now
Resident fainting goat
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 12,296
Default

We like them it stops the bowls from sliding around and they just look pretty all paired up that way
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-07-2012, 05:19 AM
Saintgirl's Avatar
Saintgirl Saintgirl is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 936
Default

There is a CORRELATION between feeding from raised feedeers and bloat. Unfortunatly Linda Arndt feverishly disagrees and this seems to have created alot of controversy because most Dane owners agree thay they are good while many other giant breed owners pass by them these days. I do not use raised feeders. Period. While there is no conclusive evidence has been found it is hard to dispute that their is a very high correlation between the two. Many of the breeds that were in the purdue study were other breeds besides danes and many of these breeds are not typical raised feeders, but the increase in bloat did get higher when comparing, say weims, with raised feeds vs not.

I also think the argument that it is more comfortable for the dog is hog wash. My Saint Bernard and any of the fosters that lumber about the house have no more difficulty bringing their heads to the dish than my beagle, because physiologically they have the same basic structure and on a scale my beagles neck is no longer on his body than my 150lb Saints. If eating from the ground was such a trial for dogs don't we think that in the path of evolution a dog would present itself much differently to accomodate such a distressing position?

I most certainly look to other factors regarding bloat to predict if I have a dog in my care that may be more predisposed to it. Like SaraB said stress, genetics, many other strong facrtors are better predictors than a raised feeder. However in my home where a stressed foster, coming from unknown genetic heritage, often underweight...well I keep the raised feeders away becauase it is one of the factors that I CAN control.

It is a personal decision for each household. I have many clients that will ask me my opinion on it and I tell them why I don't use them but that doesn't mean my advice is the best for their dogs.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-07-2012, 12:49 PM
SaraB SaraB is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 5,673
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintgirl View Post
I also think the argument that it is more comfortable for the dog is hog wash. My Saint Bernard and any of the fosters that lumber about the house have no more difficulty bringing their heads to the dish than my beagle, because physiologically they have the same basic structure and on a scale my beagles neck is no longer on his body than my 150lb Saints. If eating from the ground was such a trial for dogs don't we think that in the path of evolution a dog would present itself much differently to accomodate such a distressing position?
Depends on the dog's conformation. Yes your 150lb saints that don't have super long front legs can probably easily reach the ground. My current dane with a long neck and long front legs can easily reach the ground. However, my first dane had long front legs coupled with a short neck, he had issues reaching the ground. Think newborn foal, and that would be him. It's not just a size issue, it's how the dog is built.

Also, there isn't much evolution going on in the selective breeding of dogs.
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:17 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site