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  #41  
Old 12-18-2011, 01:35 PM
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I can't say I've ever really met a Boston that I would say is a good kids dog. They've all been, well, completely insane, balls to the wall, dog-reactive...not something I'd want to hand to a kid in a ring setting.

However, knowing it's going to be you guys and Syd, and the fact that you'd either go through a really great breeder or know enough to handle a rescue, it might work. 99% of people I meet with Bostons (and it's been A LOT. Like, ALOT A LOT) have no idea what they're doing with them and just accept their atrocious behavior as "this is how Boston's act."
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  #42  
Old 12-18-2011, 02:03 PM
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I can't say I've ever really met a Boston that I would say is a good kids dog. They've all been, well, completely insane, balls to the wall, dog-reactive...not something I'd want to hand to a kid in a ring setting.

However, knowing it's going to be you guys and Syd, and the fact that you'd either go through a really great breeder or know enough to handle a rescue, it might work. 99% of people I meet with Bostons (and it's been A LOT. Like, ALOT A LOT) have no idea what they're doing with them and just accept their atrocious behavior as "this is how Boston's act."

That's sad. Everybody I know with Bostons (with the exception of one) are also current/former Pit Bull people, and the dogs are lovely. They remind me a lot of tiny little Grants

I did find a Boston breeder in MN with a lot of performance titles on their dogs. They have a UDX and three MACH/UD/RAE dogs, plus some lower level titles. Everything but the puppies on the website are titled in obedience. I might look at their dogs sometime. We also have a couple of Papillon people in our kennel club.

We have time to think about it. And, she might not even be into dogs. She is half my husband, after all
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  #43  
Old 12-18-2011, 02:18 PM
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Bostons are well known for being excellent companion dogs for children, and with the right motivation/training, can make fun little sporting dogs for a child, too. Plus, they are low maintenance, easy keepers. Like most bull and terrier types, they are not quick to snap/bite people, even when startled. They also have a nice off switch, unlike some terriers. Another bonus.

And yes, I'm totally biased. lol But I'm not a little dog kinda gal, and Fiona has shown me that once you have a Boston, you will always want a Boston.

As for Brussels, my brother has two and they are pains in the asses.
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  #44  
Old 12-18-2011, 03:18 PM
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That's sad. Everybody I know with Bostons (with the exception of one) are also current/former Pit Bull people, and the dogs are lovely. They remind me a lot of tiny little Grants

I did find a Boston breeder in MN with a lot of performance titles on their dogs. They have a UDX and three MACH/UD/RAE dogs, plus some lower level titles. Everything but the puppies on the website are titled in obedience. I might look at their dogs sometime. We also have a couple of Papillon people in our kennel club.

We have time to think about it. And, she might not even be into dogs. She is half my husband, after all
Funny, you mentioned that kennel. A good friend of mine has a Boston from that breeder. I would wholeheartedly reccomend a Boston for a kids dog to a RESPONSIBLE dog savvy family. My friend's Boston, Jitterbug is a phenomenal Agility dog and working on OB stuff and she is littler than the Bostons I'm used to.

I love Brussels, they are super cute. A good friend of mine's sister breeds them and hers are lovely little dogs who ironically do a lot of 4H stuff cause my friend is a 4H leader.

Either of those are good choices IMO.
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  #45  
Old 12-18-2011, 03:32 PM
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I can't say I've ever really met a Boston that I would say is a good kids dog. They've all been, well, completely insane, balls to the wall, dog-reactive...not something I'd want to hand to a kid in a ring setting."
Bostons to me are basically hyperactive french bulldogs. ^^ This description I've found pretty accurate, I find them to be about as trainable comparatively as posts.
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:57 PM
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I like Bostons a lot. I could see one as being an appropriate match for your family.
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  #47  
Old 12-18-2011, 03:59 PM
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Keep in mind that we aren't going to hand a random little kid a dog and let her have at it. This is a child that has been raised by a parent that actually knows what they were doing. To be bluntly honest, she's 4yo now and I feel confidant that she wouldn't break a little dog. At 10 I would bet that she will be even more conscientious. Remember, not everybody is an idiot.
Kids don't know what they are doing. That's why I am pretty specific about what kind of experience I would want for a kid showing a dog. It's up to you to decide how much involvement you should have in this 4H project. IMO the kid should be doing the grand majority of training, handling, and day to day care under the at very minimum loose supervision of an adult. It doesn't mean mistakes won't happen.

Just yesterday my niece who is 8 who is very careful with little dogs and babies jumped over the couch corner and stepped on the cocker spaniel HARD. Yelp! Lecture for the little girl about horseplay and watching where you are going in the house, and a cocker spaniel who was a little confused on what just happened but got over it. If it had been a papillon I would likely have been at the vet, very likely with a broken dog that would have possibly cost thousands to repair and possibly years to repair mentally with the dog. For the spaniel, she was over it in about ten minutes.

Kids do stupid stuff sometimes in moments that seem random. I just think you're setting yourself and the dog up for a real headache to pick a little dog just because you think your kid would be great with dogs. Just because you're dog savvy doesn't mean your kid is and wont make a mistake - just hopefully you set your kids and pets up so their mistakes won't be potentially fatal or obscenely costly.
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Old 12-18-2011, 04:34 PM
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I'd highly recommend a Boston Terrier. For what you want, it sounds like a perfect fit. They are smart as hell and eager to please, which makes for quick and easy training. Uber-low maintenance grooming, sturdy, fun-loving, unbelievably devoted and affectionate.

My own Boston is wonderful with kids, as are many others that I know of personally. My dog's father is actually a service dog for a five yr old boy.

It also doesn't hurt to consider how many times I get stopped by older people while out with Bowie. Over and over, I've heard people telling me their fond memories of Bostons they grew up with. Obviously the Boston/Child pairing has been successful for generations.
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  #49  
Old 12-18-2011, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Kat09Tails View Post
Kids don't know what they are doing. That's why I am pretty specific about what kind of experience I would want for a kid showing a dog. It's up to you to decide how much involvement you should have in this 4H project. IMO the kid should be doing the grand majority of training, handling, and day to day care under the at very minimum loose supervision of an adult. It doesn't mean mistakes won't happen.

Just yesterday my niece who is 8 who is very careful with little dogs and babies jumped over the couch corner and stepped on the cocker spaniel HARD. Yelp! Lecture for the little girl about horseplay and watching where you are going in the house, and a cocker spaniel who was a little confused on what just happened but got over it. If it had been a papillon I would likely have been at the vet, very likely with a broken dog that would have possibly cost thousands to repair and possibly years to repair mentally with the dog. For the spaniel, she was over it in about ten minutes.

Kids do stupid stuff sometimes in moments that seem random. I just think you're setting yourself and the dog up for a real headache to pick a little dog just because you think your kid would be great with dogs. Just because you're dog savvy doesn't mean your kid is and wont make a mistake - just hopefully you set your kids and pets up so their mistakes won't be potentially fatal or obscenely costly.

So, any family with children shouldn't own anything under 40 lbs? Do you say the same thing about cats? Cats could get hurt, too. So could another baby, so perhaps people should stick to one child. Come to think of it, my husband and I have stepped on the cat before. Maybe adults shouldn't own small dogs, either.

Yes, accidents can happen, and kids can be wild. But, I was a vet tech for 13 years. I saw lots of families with small dogs, and the vast majority of them somehow live lives without getting broken by the kids in the house.

Curious, have you ever actually spent time around children that were raised in homes where they were taught to behave properly?
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Old 12-18-2011, 05:26 PM
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So, any family with children shouldn't own anything under 40 lbs? Do you say the same thing about cats? Cats could get hurt, too. So could another baby, so perhaps people should stick to one child. Come to think of it, my husband and I have stepped on the cat before. Maybe adults shouldn't own small dogs, either.

Yes, accidents can happen, and kids can be wild. But, I was a vet tech for 13 years. I saw lots of families with small dogs, and the vast majority of them somehow live lives without getting broken by the kids in the house.

Curious, have you ever actually spent time around children that were raised in homes where they were taught to behave properly?
You're being a little over dramatic.... Just wee bit...

I have spent lots of time with lots of kids well behaved and otherwise. TYVM. Kids at some point in the day will behave like children, sometimes they might even break something, they might disobey you, even if you say the word careful they might be clumsy. *shock and horror* I guess my warning is to just be realistic about who your kid is and how your dog perceives it. The kid should be allowed to make a mistake without it being the end of the world, breaking your dog's leg because of the minor mistake of stepping on his foot to some, might be a pretty big event. I know for the small dog it certainly would be.

I didn't say under 40 lbs. I said small. I mean small. As in small with fine bone. Papillons, chihuahuas, yorkies, italian greyhounds, etc.

As far as cats until recently I didn't live with them. I haven't really formulated an opinion one way or the other about it. Fendi is a pretty tough big gnarly cat, really she's about double the size of Vinnie in all directions.

I know you're a vet tech. I can tell you how many papillon breeders in the last 3 years I've known where dogs/puppies are returned to them with broken legs that the new owner couldn't afford to fix or long term care after an "incident" but that's not what this is about. It's about setting yourself up for success and IMO getting a dog that matches the job/lifestyle. IMO a papillon isn't it, imo a beagle, a teckel, a cocker, or even a shiba would be a better choice for a smaller size dog with a kid in mind. I just don't think it's a great idea because that small isn't really THAT necessary. There are a ton of slightly larger options that are just as trainable, just as fun, and not as traumatically easily breakable. But hey, do what you want - this one disagreeing voice on the internet isn't going to stop you.
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