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  #11  
Old 11-03-2011, 10:21 AM
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There really are ugly people no matter what you do, from performance, to shows, to you next door neighbor. They always have crap to say about somebody else and what they do. Sometimes you gotta learn when to realize some people really just don't ****ing matter.

I think it has more to do with how established something is, rather than the venue itself. Showing has been popular for a long long time, and has an established heirarchy and set of rules, especially compared to something like flyball or something,

Give those other sports long enough to have regular winners and establish an identity and get some money involved, then watch the egos go to work.

I personally do not like confo shows at all. I think they prove very little and do NOT steer the breeds involved in a good direction.

I used to be a part of GSD only confo shows, only because I was part of club that did them. I coped by setting up early, drinking all day and cooking food , then tear down when it was done. it was more SV type stuff, not American AKC shows, i have no idea how those go. But the majority of the people were at least nice, though there were a few that were nice to people's faces, and would berate them as soon as they left.

There was certainly politics involved at all levels, but if you just enjoy the people and your dogs, who cares? The majority of people were competetive and were good sports, like it should be. But there are always some that take it a bit further. One show I was involved in had a new young dog over from Germany, just imported. Very highly regarded, considered to be one of the top dogs in this country. He got beat by another dog in his class at the small confo show. The owner was ok with it, but the people behind him were just pissed beyond belief and trashing everyone involved.

That day, I think the right dog won from what I saw and know. The other dog had more intensity, just in gaiting as strange as that sounds, you could see more power. I don't care how they really look, but he had power. It was hot and the judge made them run a lot. That dog was in much better shape, much better muscle everything. I also had the opportunity to do protection work with both dogs. While the one from Germany did decent work, the other dog was much stronger, and I liked that.

The lesser known dog was also owned by someone that was putting on the confo show and maybe he was placed first in that show because the judge liked the person putting on the show? maybe, that's what everyone said and in my opinion the right dog won. He was stronger, and it was obvious, he had better stamina and really the only difference i could see physically was the one everybody thought should win had much blacker blacks and was very red in color where the other didn't have as rich of pigment. BFD is what I say, the dog worked better outside of the show and buried that dog in terms of stamina and strength in the show.

Anyway, that dog never beat the German import again. I know because i'm friends with both owners and both owners are friends. In fact the one guy does almost all the helper work for the other guys dogs. They compete for the right reasons. But one has more money, buys the right handlers for the shows and his dogs win a lot . Politics ?? I'm sure there are some.

I just watched some video from the lates national seiger show here in the states, a dog that placed very highly was absolutely pathetic, bred by an sv judge who was there, and co-owned by some money players in the game, and shown by a well known german handler. Another dog that showed very well, placed much lower, but was obviously a much stronger dog but owned by a little guy in the sport bought as a puppy and trained by her and shown by her and shown very well, but was not going to win anything other than appreciation from those that know what to look for.

There's politics to a degree in the sports I do, and it bothers me to a degree, but really, the only reason I do it is because i love spending time with my dogs and the people I train with. I love the progress and things we do. So in the end it those people all caught up in that really don't amount to **** to me. Others might hold them in a different light, i find it a bit sad sometimes, but mostly i just let them do their own thing, it doesn't change what I do.

Find what you like, do it, and have fun. Let those that don't matter talk all they want.
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  #12  
Old 11-03-2011, 01:23 PM
Mina Mina is offline
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On the plus side, showing (yourself) can be excellent for your doggy. It provides a different type of socialization which cannot be had in most other venues. Conformation showing, if done correctly (making it fun for the both you), can really help "round out" your dog!

If you are sociable, you will be able to make some wonderful friends (and, inevitably, some not-too-wonderful-enemies) along the way. As far as the expenditures are concerned, if you happen to live in an area where there are plenty of shows, unless and until you get serious and decide to travel, competing locally is quite inexpensive. And fortunately for you, Hayley, with Corsi, grooming requirements will be minimal.

On the down side, the reality is that these events are seldom "fair". And no matter how "good" your dog is, or how expert a handler you become, that the proverbial dice are loaded against you in favour of the professional handler, and the dog which has been campaigned. This does not mean that you will not win, only that you're not playing on a level playing field, and will probably not win as often as, perhaps, you should.

Personally, I'm not a huge fan of conformation shows. However, if you compete solely for pleasure (both yours and your dog's), and understand the simple ground rules, this can be a wonderful activity to do with your dog! And if your dog is decent, he/she will eventually finish.
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  #13  
Old 11-03-2011, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by HayleyMarie View Post
EEEKK!!!

All your stories are freaking me out lol. I guess I will have to look more into showing and if I am really "that" commited to do it. Or even if it is worth it. After all there are other dog ventues to compete and play in. Plus there is an issue of finding a mentor and since Cane Corso's are so rare here thats gonna be pretty much impossible. I have no idea what the CC crowd is like here.

P.S thanks for all the awesome responses.
I very much doubt you'd have the same sort of experience Kat or Mafia posted about in Cane Corsos.

I have been showing in AKC conformation for about 15 years and have finished several dogs and haven't really had those experiences. I have shown Belgians, GSDs, Greyhounds and a Briard. I've had the experience of some snide or snarly remarks now and then but usually from someone who's a poor loser and nothing on a regular basis at all. In fact, usually everyone congratulates the winners and goes on their way or stands ringside and chats after the show.

If you showed up at a show in my area as a newbie with a Belgian, myself and several other people would talk to you about your dog when we saw you ringside. We'd say nice things about your dog, even if they weren't what we'd personally pick out. We'd tell you about our dogs and what we do and probably encourage you towards training in obedience or rally or agility if you weren't already planning to. If you didn't seem to have anyone to help you out with grooming, we'd offer for you to come by our set up the next day and we'd help you groom your dog and tell you what to buy. We'd exchange email addresses and invite you to become FB friends. Afterwards you'd be contacted through our email loop when we are trying to plan where/when to show, so no one (including you) has to pay to go to shows where no one else will be. That is IME more typical of how it works with the lower number breeds. Everyone needs to be at least polite to everyone else or no one's dogs are getting any points and no one new will ever become involved with the breed.

As far as how people keep their dogs, the majority of people I know keep their dogs as pets. Many do other things with their dogs. Some breeders do have kennel only dogs but it's generally not well looked upon by others. The people I know mostly don't care who you got your dog from or don't say if they do. They mostly just care that you show up when you're entered and don't break the major

I suspect having a less common, less competitive breed, your experience will be much more similar to mine. Of course, your attitude towards others in your area will also affect how you are treated. I don't see that really being an issue for you though. And don't worry if you don't have anyone to help you out who has the same breed as you. You aren't looking at a breed which requires special grooming or handling finesse. Find a place that offers good conformation handling classes and take your puppy. You will meet all kinds of people who show that will give you advice, critique your handling and help you out at your first shows. And of course, you'll learn how to handle your dog
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  #14  
Old 11-03-2011, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Mina View Post
On the plus side, showing (yourself) can be excellent for your doggy. It provides a different type of socialization which cannot be had in most other venues. Conformation showing, if done correctly (making it fun for the both you), can really help "round out" your dog!
I'm curious about this. In what ways does conformation showing provide socialization that performance sports don't? I've never shown a dog in confo and probably won't anytime soon, unless I decided to show my corgi ironically, LOL.
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:41 PM
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I'm curious about this. In what ways does conformation showing provide socialization that performance sports don't? I've never shown a dog in confo and probably won't anytime soon, unless I decided to show my corgi ironically, LOL.
I so think you should her!

Good conformation classes can be a great socialization experience for puppies - lots of real hands-on handling by strangers coupled with treats. And shows can be crazy! I've had my dogs fallen on, stepped on, gating knocked onto, etc at crowded shows ringside. I don't know that it provides socialization beyond what other venues do but there is a certain hectic environment that goes with big, crowded conformation shows. FWIW I know dogs who are very successful in agility but "can't handle" being in the conformation ring. Not that I think it's a temperament test or anything.
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  #16  
Old 11-03-2011, 03:07 PM
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I am a reluctant show person lol.

I show the whippets cause I should. Its ok, I don't find it fun. They find it ok, but its not high on their list of things to do. Running agility, a round of rally or a day coursing is much more fun for them and me.

One of the issues I have with showing, other than the politics is that if you have only one dog and you show it there is little you can do to 'improve' your dog if its not winning. In agility you can train harder, take lessons try new things. With conformation if you dog is a little to small, has a less than preferred physical trait it doesn't matter how much you do.

You won't find too many people showing dogs who only have the one. Its usually breeders or owners who are showing cause they have a friend who is a breeder and they are showing the dog they got from their friend. These people often have multiple dogs and if one doesn't win much they dont' show it unless they are tying to help someone 'get points'.

Showing JRTs is a little different, and a little more fun. But not much lol. I enjoyed showing Kat a little. But a part of the deal was the pride of showing off what *I* produced. I can't say I have the same push to show Seren, even though she is nicer. I likely will show her a bit. But once I find out what she enjoys I will likely concentrate on that.
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:06 PM
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I so think you should her!

Good conformation classes can be a great socialization experience for puppies - lots of real hands-on handling by strangers coupled with treats. And shows can be crazy! I've had my dogs fallen on, stepped on, gating knocked onto, etc at crowded shows ringside. I don't know that it provides socialization beyond what other venues do but there is a certain hectic environment that goes with big, crowded conformation shows. FWIW I know dogs who are very successful in agility but "can't handle" being in the conformation ring. Not that I think it's a temperament test or anything.
Ah, that makes sense. I guess since most OB/Rally trials I go to are huge confo shows, I wasn't thinking of quieter, performance only events (though I have been to those as well).

I actually have a coworker who wants to show her for me, haha. I told her she may not do so well (LOL) and that made her more determined. She breeds Frenchies, but is surprisingly levelheaded. She's outraged that such a functional dog with a great temperament would get overlooked for something short and fat, and she's determined to get Keeva in the breed ring, lol. So the mutant corgi may be shown yet.
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  #18  
Old 11-03-2011, 06:14 PM
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Thanks for all the great input guys..hmm I have alot to think about...
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  #19  
Old 11-03-2011, 06:28 PM
SaraB SaraB is offline
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All I can say about showing is that you will have a lot more fun if you join a breed club and get to know the other people in your area showing.
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  #20  
Old 11-03-2011, 08:50 PM
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Thanks for all the great input guys..hmm I have alot to think about...
If you want to just try it out, check into IABCA showing first. It's awesome! You can show in a t-shirt and jeans if you want, don't have to do tons and tons of grooming, and the judges give you a written critique of your dog. I love those shows. Plus if you end up in BC you can head south to the working dog expo IABCA show here . There's tons of corsos and filas...
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