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Old 08-27-2011, 09:55 AM
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JustaLilBitaLuck JustaLilBitaLuck is offline
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Originally Posted by scrofford View Post
They ARE considered organic. Follow the links I posted in the upper theads. And whatever you want to do or think is fine.
No, they're not considered organic. Very, very few foods are truly "organic" (I can only think of three, and I work at a pet food store) - and since "organic" is a USDA-regulated term, companies can't use the term without the USDA certification.

I hear the terms "natural", "free-range", "organic", "human grade" and "holistic" all the time at work, and I think there is confusion as to what they actually mean.

"Organic" is a term that is regulated by the USDA. In order for a crop to be organic, it must be grown (the crop and the land itself) without chemicals, fertilizers, and pesticides. For meat to be organic, it must be raised without antibiotics or synthetic hormones, and the feed must be considered organic as well. Again, for a product to use the term "organic" it must be certified by the USDA. If companies are using "organic" in their advertising for a product that is not organic, they can end up with fines, lawsuits, etc.

"Natural" simply means that there are no additives or preservatives in the food. This term is not regulated.

"Holistic" just means that the food was formulated with the whole body in mind, that it is a food to nourish the whole body. Again, not regulated, and says nothing about the individual ingredients.

"Free-range" is a USDA-regulated term. All "free-range" means is that the animals have access to the outdoors - it doesn't specify the quality of the land, or how much land each animal has, etc.

There are two food "categories" - human-grade and feed-grade. Human-grade applies to a product that is legally approved to consumed by people. Feed-grade applies to a product that is only legally approved to be consumed by animals because of the ingredients that were used or the way it was made. Pet food can be "made with human grade ingredients", but once those human-grade ingredients have entered a pet food plant, it is now feed-grade. Currently, the Honest Kitchen is the only pet food company (I believe) allowed to use "human grade" in their advertising, as all their ingredients (before processing) are human grade, and the food is made in a human processing facility.

So, to sum up? Wellness, Canidae, Blue Buffalo. Natural? Yes. Holistic? Yes. Organic? Most definitely not.

Sorry about the ridiculously long post, but this kind of stuff bugs me on a day-to-day basis.

EDIT: Yes, Blue Buffalo used to have an organic line, that, as far as I know, was truly organic. I don't know what happened to it and why, but it is no longer in the market.
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  #32  
Old 08-28-2011, 12:28 PM
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AllieMackie AllieMackie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustaLilBitaLuck View Post
No, they're not considered organic. Very, very few foods are truly "organic" (I can only think of three, and I work at a pet food store) - and since "organic" is a USDA-regulated term, companies can't use the term without the USDA certification.

I hear the terms "natural", "free-range", "organic", "human grade" and "holistic" all the time at work, and I think there is confusion as to what they actually mean.

"Organic" is a term that is regulated by the USDA. In order for a crop to be organic, it must be grown (the crop and the land itself) without chemicals, fertilizers, and pesticides. For meat to be organic, it must be raised without antibiotics or synthetic hormones, and the feed must be considered organic as well. Again, for a product to use the term "organic" it must be certified by the USDA. If companies are using "organic" in their advertising for a product that is not organic, they can end up with fines, lawsuits, etc.

"Natural" simply means that there are no additives or preservatives in the food. This term is not regulated.

"Holistic" just means that the food was formulated with the whole body in mind, that it is a food to nourish the whole body. Again, not regulated, and says nothing about the individual ingredients.

"Free-range" is a USDA-regulated term. All "free-range" means is that the animals have access to the outdoors - it doesn't specify the quality of the land, or how much land each animal has, etc.

There are two food "categories" - human-grade and feed-grade. Human-grade applies to a product that is legally approved to consumed by people. Feed-grade applies to a product that is only legally approved to be consumed by animals because of the ingredients that were used or the way it was made. Pet food can be "made with human grade ingredients", but once those human-grade ingredients have entered a pet food plant, it is now feed-grade. Currently, the Honest Kitchen is the only pet food company (I believe) allowed to use "human grade" in their advertising, as all their ingredients (before processing) are human grade, and the food is made in a human processing facility.

So, to sum up? Wellness, Canidae, Blue Buffalo. Natural? Yes. Holistic? Yes. Organic? Most definitely not.

Sorry about the ridiculously long post, but this kind of stuff bugs me on a day-to-day basis.

EDIT: Yes, Blue Buffalo used to have an organic line, that, as far as I know, was truly organic. I don't know what happened to it and why, but it is no longer in the market.
Excellent post! I too, hear all the terms at work on a daily basis (I also work at a pet food store). Our store is located in between a district of "hippies" and a district of "yuppies" so we always get questions about natural, free-range, holistic and organic foods. It's extremely important to know the difference between the terms, and what each one truly means.
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