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  #11  
Old 02-01-2010, 05:09 PM
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PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Originally a cattle dog, they're very confident. Considered a medium dog, they're short because they are a dwarf breed. Ancestry is somewhat unknown, but likely there's spitz ancestry.

acceptable colors: Red, sable, fawn, black and tan with or without white markings.
White is allowed on legs, chest, neck (either in part or as a collar). muzzle, underparts and as a narrow blaze on head.
Blue, fawn, "whitely" (predominantly white with colored markings), mismarks and fluffies are serious faults.

Temperament: They should never be shy. Shyness is disqualifying. They shouldn't be aggressive, but defensiveness/guardiness isn't at all uncommon. They've got a bit of tenacity and are absolute clowns.

Height: 10-12 inches

Weight: Males, about 27 pounds, females about 25 pounds.

Health Problems: The current list of health top health concerns is:
Hip dysplasia
Eye problems: progressive retinal atrophy, retinal folds, persistent pupilarily membranes, cataracts
Cancer and autoimmune system problems (including underactive and overactive immune systems)
Reproductive problems: uterine inertia during whelping, sterility in males (related to autoimmune problems?)
Degenerative Myelopathy is also becoming a serious concern

Exercise: Moderate. They tend to do better with multiple shorter sessions than one long one.

Life Expectancy: About 15 years

Grooming: Moderate brushing. They have an undercoat, so there is seasonal shedding - and often quite a lot.

What to look for in a breeder: Same stuff as with any breed - health testing, proving the dog's in some venue, knowledge of the breed, contracts, ongoing support.

Ideal living conditions: Indoors with a yard. They don't handle extreme temperatures well (hot or cold), so need to have sufficient shelter from those.

"Ideal" owner: ME!
Someone who will appreciate the antics, someone who is good at keeping food out of reach, someone who doesn't mind vacuuming, someone who will train their dog - pemmies are way to smart and way too cunning to go without training. Someone who will spend time interacting with the dog - they live to be the center of attention, and will cause trouble if needed to get that attention.

Trainability: High. They're typically a very food motivated dog, which certainly helps. They're very intelligent. But they're not the typical "yes ma'am" type of herding breed. There's spitz ancestry, so expect some independence and creativity. They don't do well with repetitive training - they figure things out quickly and will then move on to figuring out how to not do it if it's repeated. They do enjoy putting their own spin on things, so when training, it helps to keep a sense of humor.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in)
Some can be quite vocal, but not all are. Good with older kids. I would be hesitant to recommend them for someone with young kids. They can be good with cats if raised with them or taught how to behave. They do tend to be mouthy. They're usually very outgoing with strangers.

They've done well in obedience, agility, tracking and herding.

Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)

PWCCA - Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America, Inc.
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Last edited by corgipower; 02-01-2010 at 05:22 PM.
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  #12  
Old 02-01-2010, 05:16 PM
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Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Tollers began in the early 1900's in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Canada to "toll" (lure) ducks into shore to give the hunters a better shooting range. The dog was then sent to retrieve the birds. Tolling is an act of playfully bouncing along the shoreline after sticks or a ball that the hunter is throwing for the dog. The ducks are intrigued by the Toller's playful antics and are drawn in closer.

Appearance: Tollers have a medium-long double coat accepted in varying shades of red with or without white markings on paws, face, chest, and tail tip. Tollers are permitted to have flesh or liver pigment that blends with the coat, or black pigment.

Temperament: Tollers are very out-going, happy, and are loads of fun but also know when to be serious. They are supposed to be reserved with people that they don't know, but not shy. They're very excitable, high energy dogs but should have an off switch. Most Tollers are quite content to lie around the house most of the day, doing whatever it is you're doing, but are always ready to spring into action when appropriate.

Height: 17-21". Ideal height for females is 18" and ideal for males is 19".

Weight: The standard calls for 37-51lbs. Most females are between 30-40lbs, and most males between 45-50lbs.

Health Problems: CEA and PRA, thyroid, hip-dysplasia, and varying auto-immune disorders.

Exercise: Anywhere from 1 to 2 hours of exercise a day should make most Tollers happy. Some require more. Tollers will go all day if you let them though, regardless of energy level.

Life Expectancy: 12-14yrs on average.

Grooming: Minimal grooming is needed. Depending on the coat, a once a week brushing is fine, and many don't even need that. They don't really have a very doggy smell that I've never noticed, so bathe when you feel the dog needs one -- generally once a month or longer. Feet and ears should be kept trimmed to keep the dog looking tidy. Tollers shed a fair amount, some more than others depending on the amount of coat. Some dogs have heavier coats than others.

What to look for in a breeder: Somebody who health tests (CERF, OFA, thyroid), and somebody who competes, trains, and titles their dogs in multiple venues. Not just conformation.

Ideal living conditions: Tollers thrive on being a part of the family in your home. They adore their people. A fenced yard is ideal, but I wouldn't say a requirement for a Toller as long as you're willing to provide them with an adequate amount of exercise and time away from the home.

"Ideal" owner: Somebody with a sense of humour, somebody who wants a serious but eager and fun little worker, and somebody who is willing to put in the time and effort to properly socialize (very important in this breed!), train, and exercise a Toller.

Trainability: Easy. They have a bit of an independent, "what's in it for me" streak but also adore learning and working with you. They're very intelligent and grasp new concepts quickly.

Other traits: Tollers need heavy socialization. They make great family pets, but must be exposed to kids from an early age or they might be afraid. Many Tollers get along with and live with cats, but there are also many Tollers who are very prey driven toward cats. Many Tollers are also screamers when they're excited. Tollers do well in heat or cold for reasonable amounts of time. Just be aware that they will drive themselves to exhaustion, especially in the heat. They don't always know when to stop themselves if they're intent on something (like a ball).


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:

NSDTR Club of Canada

NSDTRC(USA) Home

TollerLinks - Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (click on the flags for breeders)




















Last edited by Toller_08; 02-01-2010 at 06:09 PM.
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  #13  
Old 02-01-2010, 06:10 PM
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Doberman Pinscher

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: The Doberman originated in Germany by tax collector Louis Dobermann, who wanted a medium sized guard dog as well as a companion to accompany him on his rounds. Since Louis Dobermann was also the local dog catcher, nobody knows for certain which breeds went into the creation of the Doberman but the German Pinscher, Rottweiler, Greyhound, Manchester Terrier and German Shepherd are thought to have all contributed to the breed.

Appearance: Dobermans are supposed to be a moderate, medium sized, athletic, but powerful looking dog. They wear a sleek, close fitting smooth coat that is accepted in Black, Red, Blue, and Fawn all with rust markings.

Temperament: The Doberman is a very high energy, intense, alert working breed. They are totally and completely devoted to their family, and often velcro themselves to one person in particular. Dobermans are generally reserved with new people, but not shy or aggressive. They like to observe their surroundings and take everything in, always watching out for their people. Once a Doberman gets to know you, they're as sweet as can be, but don't expect a Doberman to be your new best friend upon first meeting the dog.

Height: Females are 24-26" tall and males 26-28" tall

Weight: Females are between 55-70lbs and males 75-90lbs.

Health Problems: The #1 health problem facing the breed is Dilated Cardiomyopathy, which is a disease that means the heart cannot contract properly. A dog diagnosed with DCM pretty much recieves a death sentence. There are medications to help a dog possibly live a bit longer, but no cure. Some dogs don't even show any symptoms of DCM and just collapse and die all of a sudden. Hypothyroidism, cancer, Von Willebrands Disease (hemophelia), liver issues, and hip dysplasia are other concerns. There is also the possibility of Wobbler's and also Gastric Torsion (bloat).

Exercise: As young dogs, Dobermans require a lot of exercise. They need to get out for a good run, about an hour or two long, sometimes more. As the Doberman starts to mature, they don't require quite as much. A good run a few times a week should make most dobermans happy. They're quite content to be couch potatos most of the day until you say it's time to go.

Life Expectancy: About 10-12 years on average. I've known a couple 14 year olds and one 16 year old, but that's not very common. DCM can take them much too soon.

Grooming: Minimal grooming is required. You want to keep your Doberman's nails nice and short to maintain those tight feet, and a bath once a month (or longer) will suffice.

What to look for in a breeder: Somebody who health tests (very important) and proves their dogs in some sort of venue, preferably multiple venues. There is a working vs. conformation split in this breed, so be aware of that. Also, avoid breeders advertising "King" or "Warlock" Dobermans (or oversized Dobermans in general). An oversized Doberman is not a healthy Doberman.

Ideal living conditions: The Doberman needs to be in a home with it's family. They are by no means an outdoor dog. The Doberman not only has a coat that does not do well in most weather conditions, but they also just do not do well when away from their people. I would not have a Doberman without a fenced in yard, but I won't say that a fenced yard is a requirement. Other people have different views.

"Ideal" owner: Somebody who likes a dog who thrives on being with you (they take the term "velcro dog" to a whole new level), somebody who likes to spend a lot of time training and working with their dog, and somebody who enjoys a bit of a challenge.

Trainability: Relatively easy. Dobermans are thinkers and don't just do something because you told it to. They like to think of new, perhaps (in their minds) "better" ways to go about something. The Doberman is a highly intelligent breed and if left to it's own devices, can and will outsmart it's owner. They can be pretty naughty and definitely require fair but firm handling. They are very quick to catch on to new things.

Other traits: Socialization is key. This breed is a serious working dog bred for the purpose of protection in mind. In order to have a stable, well rounded dog make sure your Doberman gets to meet all sorts of different people and things from an early age. With proper socialization and training, many Dobermans excel at things like therapy work. Do the breed a favour and make sure your Doberman is a good canine citizen. Another important note is that same sex aggression is very common in the breed. Males especially. It is advised never to have a male Doberman living with any other male dog, intact or not. Most female Dobes are good in multiple dog homes with other females, but not all. Dobermans are also a very vocal breed -- they moan, groan, whine, etc. to express their opinions. They are not generally barky though.


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:

DPCA | Home
















Last edited by Toller_08; 02-01-2010 at 06:51 PM.
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  #14  
Old 02-01-2010, 06:22 PM
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Default Westhighland white terrier

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: The Westie originated in Scotland around the 1800's and originatly used to chase and dig out foxes and badgers and other vermine.

acceptable colors: White is the only acceptable color in the breed.

Temperament: Outgoing, very hardy breed that is pretty much up for anything. They love to dig and be outdoors. The Westie is friendly, but slightly aloof with strangers. A very confident breed that is very happy and free.

Height: Male dogs should stand 11 inches at the withers and Bitches should stand 9-10 Inches at the withers.

Weight: Male's weight between 15 and 20 pounds and Bitches 13-16 Pounds.

Health Problems: The Westie is prone to Craniomandibular osteopathy, liver Disease, jawbone calcification, chronic hernias and skin problems.

Exercise: The Westie needs lots of excersise. They need a walk or two a day, and lots of mental stimulation like throwing a ball or playing tug-a-war. I find them to be pretty high energy.

Life Expectancy: Westies can live between 12-17 years.

Grooming: The Westie needs daily brushings, Show dogs are have their coats stipped by removing the dead hairs or the top layer of hairs. This keeps the coat harsh and wiry. Most pet Westies get clipped into a westie cut, but this soften's the coat. Baths are not recommended for the Westie because of their sensative skin as well it soften's their coat.

What to look for in a breeder: Look for a breeder who does health testing

Ideal living conditions:
A place with a yard that they can run and romp all they want, being inside with the family is a must, they love partaking in the family activities.

"Ideal" owner: An owner who like's being outside and romping around, and who is willing to have a dog follow you around all day with a toy in their mouth. They should be willing to take the dog everwhere they do. They should also understand the breeds prey drive and need to chase small furry creatures.

Trainability:
They are an independant breed, and stubborn so they need a firm, constant hand. They can and will outsmart you so you must always be on your feet. But they learn things very quickly

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in)

The Westie is very good with children, but with everyother breed needs lots of socialization. They do have a high prey drive so training with small rodents is a must if you have them. They tolerate the heat and the cold pretty well. This breed does well in agility and earth dog sports

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Last edited by HayleyMarie; 02-01-2010 at 06:37 PM.
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  #15  
Old 02-01-2010, 06:56 PM
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COLLIE (Rough and Smooth)

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: (From UKC Standard - Characteristics) The Collie has a strong physical structure, enabling it to perform its intended purpose, which is herding. Its coat is thick enough in both coat varieties, the Smooth and the Rough, to protect it from the elements. In the Rough, it is not so weighty as to tire it. The Collie is a balanced dog, easily trainable, is oriented to people and duty, and is a good watchdog, whether it is of the family's property, the children or the livestock.

From FCI standard 'General Appearance': Appears as gifted with intelligence, alertness and activity. Stands with dignity governed by perfect anatomical formation, with no part out of proportion, giving appearance of working capability.

Acceptable Colors: (In the US) The four recognized colors are "Sable and White," "Tri-color," "Blue Merle" and "White." There is no preference among them. The "Sable and White" is predominantly sable (a fawn sable color of varying shades from light gold to dark mahogany) with white markings usually on the chest, neck, legs, feet and the tip of the tail. A blaze may appear on the foreface or backskull or both. The "Tri-color" is predominantly black, carrying white markings as in a "Sable and White" and has tan shadings on and about the head and legs. The "Blue Merle" is a mottled or "marbled" color predominantly blue-grey and black with white markings as in the "Sable and White" and usually has tan shadings as in the "Tri-color." The "White" is predominantly white, preferably with sable, tri-color or blue merle markings. Edited to add - the sable merle is a common color, although not accepted as such by the standard, there are people working to get it added. The Sable Merle is a sable with a darker but muted red/brown merle pattern (not typically as distinctly marked as other breed's Red/Sable Merles).

Note: The White is not accepted in UK and most of Europe.

Temperament: A friendly breed with those they know, but can be protective of family and home. Not typically aloof, but do tend to be quiet and watchful around strangers until it is determined they can be trusted. Usually have an innate love of babies and small children, even if not raised with them.

Height: Males: 24-26 in, Females: 22-24 in (In Europe, both sexes are 2 inches shorter than the US standard).

Weight: Males: 60 - 75 lbs, Females: 50-65 lbs (Again, in Europe, they are considerably smaller: Males 45-65 lbs, Females 40-55 lbs).

Health Problems: Eye disorders (Collie Eye Anomaly, Progressive Retinal Atrophy); Hip Dysplasia, Drug Sensitivity (MDR1); hypothyroidism; dermatomyositis

Exercise: Moderate exercise needed. Can be good apartment dogs if given adequate exercise.

Life Expectancy: Usually 10-15 yrs.

Grooming: Roughs are double coated and require a weekly brushing to maintain shedding. Smooths do shed, but not in the same manner. Weekly brushing also keeps them in top condition. Bathing not needed unless the dog gets dirty.

What to look for in a breeder: Breeder who does health testing, and works their dogs in some event to showcase the versatility of the breed. Someone looking to eradicate the problems inherent in the breed.

Ideal living conditions: Indoor dog.

"Ideal" owner: Active family, but happy with 'weekend warriors'. Very good for families with children of all ages.

Trainability: Easy to train with positive methods. Do not respond well to harsh correction.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in): Highly intelligent and excel as service and guide dogs. Awesome performance dogs, who will attempt many sports. They may not always be a top contender, but you'll see them in a lot of places giving it their 'all' with a sense of humor. Great with children and other pets when raised with them and taught proper interaction. Herding instinct that goes uncontrolled can result in fence running and car chasing, but only in dogs without proper mental stimulation.


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)

American Working Collie Association American Working Collie Association Home Page
Collie Club of America Collie Club Of America Homepage
WSU Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology Dept (for MDR1 info): Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology Lab at the College of Veterinary Medicine
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Old 02-01-2010, 07:13 PM
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AMERICAN HAIRLESS TERRIER



GENERAL DESCRIPTION:
The American Hairless Terrier is a small to medium sized, well-balanced, muscular dog with a sleek and elegant look. It comes in two sizes, miniature and standard. The miniature stands under 13inches tall. The standard is 13inches to 18inches tall. They are alert, intelligent, and loving dogs. Their high energy makes them good playmates for children, and their intelligent and loving nature makes them loyal family members.

Acceptable Colors: Hairless Variety: Any skin color is acceptable. The skin is usually parti-colored with an underlying skin color and freckles or spots of contrasting color. Freckles enlarge with age, and skin color will darken when exposed to the sun.

Coated Variety: The coated American Hairless Terrier may be solid white, bi-color, tri-color, sable or brindle, but must always have some white, which may be of any size and located anywhere on the dog. The white area may be ticked as long as white predominates. The remaining accepted colors are: black, tan (ranging from dark tan to very light tan and from intense dark mahogany red to light red with black nose and eye rims), chocolate (ranging from dark liver to light chocolate with self-colored nose and eye rims), blue and blue fawn (with self-colored nose and eye rims), apricot (ranging from orange to faded yellow with black nose and eye rims), and lemon (ranging from orange to faded yellow with self-colored nose and eye rims).

Temperament:
The American Hairless Terrier is an energetic, alert dog whose curiosity and intelligence make him easy to train. The ancestors of this breed were bred to hunt. The lack of coat makes the hairless variety unsuited for hunting, but both varieties still have a strong hunting instinct and the coated dogs are fearless, tenacious hunters with seemingly unlimited energy. The American Hairless Terrier is an exceptionally friendly companion, getting along well with children, other dogs, and even cats. American Hairless Terriers enjoy human companionship immensely and will enthusiastically share any activity with their owners.

Height: The American Hairless Terrier ranges in height from 10 to 18 inches tall.

Weight: Varies from 10 to 20 lbs (can't find documentation - this is my personal estimate based upon size ... most dogs I've seen weighed basically 1 lb/in. )

Health Problems: Patellar Luxation, Cardiac disorders, Eye disorders (Primary Lens Luxation)

Exercise: Moderate exercise needed. Can be good apartment dogs if given adequate exercise.

Life Expectancy: Usually 15+ yrs.

Grooming: Very minimal grooming needed. Sun protection needed for hairless variety.

What to look for in a breeder: Breeder who does health testing, and works their dogs in some event to showcase the versatility of the breed. Someone looking to eradicate the problems inherent in the breed.

Ideal living conditions: Indoor dog.

"Ideal" owner: Active family, but happy with 'weekend warriors'. Very good for families with children of all ages.

Trainability: Train with positive methods. They are terriers and can be stubborn, so they must have discipline and set rules from an early age to avoid behavioral problems.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in): Awesome performance dogs, especially terrier racing. Great with children and other pets when raised with them and taught proper interaction, although will still chase strange animals and 'varmints'. The hairless variety is one of the only truly hairless breeds, with no hair on the body, and are therefore often good for those with allergies. Information on 'allergy testing' can be found on the AHTA website.


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)

American Hairless Terrier Association
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~American Hairless Terriers (coated)~
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "OE" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
UFR USR GRCH 'PR' "Spud" TT (UKC Total Dog Award winner)
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Old 02-01-2010, 07:22 PM
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BREED NAME:Cardigan Welsh Corgi

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: The cardigan welsh corgi, fondly called the "cardi," is a hardy, dwarfed cattle dog from Cardiganshire County in Wales. It's famous cousin is the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. the cardi is called corgi WITH the tail.

While both are corgis, they come from different ancestral heritage. Cardis originate from the tekkal dogs, from which also doxies and bassets also originated. They are the older of the two corgi breeds, and were developed specifically to drive cattle.

acceptable colors: Almost any color is acceptable, however a dog with too much white is not desirable. White must not touch the outside corner of the eye. Colors are black and white, tricolor with tan points, tricolor with brindle points, brindle, red and blue merle. Brindle merles and red merles are not acceptable.

Fluffies are not acceptable in the show ring, but are ridiculously cute and I really want one one day.

Temperament: Instincts towards herding, though not all cardigans will display this tendency. Active, curious, and incredibly intelligent. They have a natural suspicion of "new" people or things, and must be socialized heavily. Many cardigans are reactive or aggressive towards other dogs.

They are a "serious" breed, in that they are a goofy-in-your-face type breed like labs are. They do not love everyone, but they will tolerate them.

Height: 10 to 13 inches

Weight: approx 25 to 40 lbs

Health Problems
: none. Just kidding LOL Um... some auto immune disorders crop up, like Addison's and Lupus. Many corgis are dysplastic, and so testing MUST be done on every parent. Invertebral disk disease does crop up as well as degenerative myelopathy and other diseases inherant in dwarfed dogs.

Corgis tend to have growth plate closure issues and care should be given to what is fed to a young corgi as too much calcium and protien can affect the skeletal health down the road. Puppies that are overweight will often grow into dysplastic adults.

Exercise: As puppies, care should be taken that the puppy not play "too hard" and injure itself. Cardis are very active little dogs and daily exercise is important. However, the mental stimulation is far more important as corgis are a thinking breed and are destructive if their mental energy is not somehow expended.

Think about cardis like this: a 30 lb dog that used to drive cattle is not going to be a 30 lb dog that just anyone would want to have LOL

Life Expectancy: 12-16 years

Grooming:
if the dog is not a fluffy, just knock the dirt off and be on about your way Lol just teasing. I'd say a good brushing twice a week should be enough. The coat is extremely wash and wear!

What to look for in a breeder: I personally wouldn't buy from anyone who makes excuses for why they don't test for HD or DM. If they didn't show, I wouldn't be too worried as long as they do herding or agility or something.

Ideal living conditions:
Cardis are pretty versitile as a breed. They're small enough to travel well, but large enough not to be "foo foo" (please don't be offended LOL I just couldn't think of another way to describe cute little fluffy doggies!)

"Ideal" owner: mentally and physically active with a desire to have a constant companion who always has a "ready to go" attitude. Cardis will fit in to any house hold. They love kids and get along well with other pets IF SOCIALIZED PROPERLY.

Trainability: Cardis are very bright and they will out think you. You have to be on your toes when you train them. They will find every loop hole in your training method. Trust me on this one.


Other traits:
They are complete lovely mush balls with their people. A sweeter breed you're not likely to find. They are loyal to a fault and they tend to bond very tightly with one person in particular. They display herding tendencies even when playing, and other herding breeds are their best play buddies.


Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:

The breed club: Cardigan Welsh Corgi Club of America
Cardi Commentary: Cardigan Welsh Corgi info
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Old 02-01-2010, 08:42 PM
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HayleyMarie HayleyMarie is offline
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Default Bouvier De Flander

Bouvier De Flanders


GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Originally bred for herding cattle. The french name translates to english "cow herder" or "Ox herder" The Bouve was created in france, and Belgum by the flemish people who wanted a dog that could herd, act as a stock dog, guard dog, pull carts, kill vermin and be a family companion. The Bouve today is widly used as a family pet, guard dog, police dog and as well to herd cattle.

acceptable colors: Grey, black, fawn, brindle, dark grey. A white star on te chest is allowed

Temperament: The Bouve is a calm dog that is very assertive and outgoing. They are aloof with strangers, but not overly agressive. They are a happy even tempered dog that is outgoing and boiusterouse. Tjhey have a very high prey drive and love to herd things. They are great guardians of their family and will protect them to the end.

Height: Males are 24 1/2 inches to 27 1/2 inches and Bitches are 23 1/2 inches to 26 1/2 inches.

Weight: Male weigh between 77-100 pounds and bitches weigh between 60-85 pounds.

Health Problems: Hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, heart conditions and thyroid problems. Eye problems such as cataracts, entropion and glaucoma.

Exercise:The Bouve is high energy dog that needs lots of excerise and mental stimulation. They are a dog that needs a job to do. Either that be hauling kids around in a wagon or herding cows. They need to have a long hard walk daily to keep them happy.

Life Expectancy: 9-12 years.

Grooming: The Bouve needs alot of grooming, they have thick, whiry coat that needs brushing daily, they also need to see the groomers to maintain their coat and shape. The bouvier does not shed.

What to look for in a breeder: A breeder that does all health testing, also titles.

Ideal living conditions: Bouviers need a big yard to romp and play in. The need to be with their family and like to be inside at night..

"Ideal" owner: An owner that can spend lots of time playing and excerising and walking their dog. They also need a job to do. So an owner willing to provide that would be awesome. If they get bored they are a dog that will "do" before "thinking"

Trainability: They are very trainable. And learn very fast and need obediance training because of that. They have a very high prey drive so you need to keep that into consideration.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in)
Bouviers are fantastic with other dogs, because of their high prey drive they do need traning with smaller animals and pets. They thrive in the cold weather but the heat is a little harder for them to tolerate because of their thick coat, often owners will shave them in the summer. The Bouve excells in agility, herding classes as well as schutzhund, and pulling.







Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)

Bouvier des Flandres Club of Canada
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  #19  
Old 02-01-2010, 09:09 PM
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BELGIAN MALINOIS

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: One of four varieties of Belgian Shepherd. Originally a herding breed, they are often seen doing police work and protection sport.

acceptable colors: Fawn, with or without black overlay. Black mask.

Temperament: Energetic and alert. Always ready to jump into action.
From the FCI standard:
"Its lively, alert temperament and its confident nature, showing no fear or aggressiveness, should be obvious in its body stance and the proud attentive expression in its sparkling eyes."
(I love that part )

Height: About 22-24 inches

Weight: Males 55-65 pounds, females 45-55 pounds.

Health Problems: I'm not entirely sure, but hips, elbows, eyes, epilepsy are pretty high on the watch list.

Exercise: Lots! These dogs are extremely high energy and high drive and need a lot of exercise. Preferably structured and not just aimless running around.

Life Expectancy: 10-14 years, depending on who you ask.

Grooming: Minimal. Their coat tends to stay quite clean. They do have an undercoat, so need brushing out for that.

What to look for in a breeder: The usual...health testing, support system. Also knowledge of not only the breed, but their lines. Someone who proves their dogs in some sport or real life work. Producing stable temperaments is important. An unstable mali is more of a nightmare than it might be in some other breeds.

Ideal living conditions: These dogs are very handler oriented and need to live in the home with their people. They also need some way to get plenty of exercise. A yard is ideal, but if not then be prepared to spend sufficient time away from home meeting his needs.

"Ideal" owner: Someone who is experienced with energetic, drivey dogs. Someone who is prepared to train the dog and preferably give them a "job". Someone who is energetic and active.

Trainability: Very high. They tend to be eager to please and always ready to go. They're very athletic and versatile, so pretty much anything you want to do is possible.

Other traits: (good with kids, cats, other dogs, pets, strangers.... likes the cold, likes the heat... activies/sports the breed does well in)
Some might be too high drive for young children and cats, some can learn to calm down. They often are missing an off switch and their prey drive is quickly triggered. They are often "pack" oriented though, so they quickly learn what's acceptable and not in interacting with members of their house.

If you're going to own a mali with young kids or cats, be sure you're prepared to put in time supervising and training him to behave appropriately.

They tend to be all weather dogs. They do love the cold. Heat can be an issue, because they won't stop just because they're hot. The owner needs to make sure they take a break and cool off properly.

Useful links for those who want to own/know more about this breed:
(good breeders, breed info sites, clubs, etc..)

Gallery of Dogs
Belgian Malinois, Malinois
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  #20  
Old 02-03-2010, 09:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corgipower View Post
BELGIAN MALINOIS

Height: About 22-24 inches

I agree, other than the size. The standard goes to 26 inches. My dog is around 25.5 inches, and is pretty average for a male. I've seen many males larger at FR trials & seminars, SchH seminars, and in the show ring, but I've not seen many that were that much smaller than him. I think 22-24 would be a fair size range for bitches, but I'd not fault one a bit larger.
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