Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog and Pet Fun > Photography


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 03-06-2009, 12:40 PM
96 GTS 96 GTS is offline
Custom User Title
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,658
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizmo View Post
I need help. I'm using the manual setting. ISO 100. White balance is auto. f/5 and a shutter speed of 125.

But if the sun is behind me or I'm shooting into the sun, this happens. . .



Yet, if I change the settins to portrait mode this happens, same. . .sun behind me.



Like it's WAY over exposed?
As others have said, your photo is way way overexposed, up your shutter speed close down the aperture, or both. Your light meter is definitely your friend, too, it'll tell you whether your photo is over or underexposed, and by how much. Any digital camera with manual settings will have one, and likely a good one, built in.

Also, if you're shooting action, I would suggest shooting in shutter priority mode. Set the shutter speed to what you want for the desired amount of blur, and the camera will adjust the aperture to take a well exposed photo. This especially helpful while panning a moving subject, where each frame is likely to have a different amount of light.

Program or automatic modes are not crutches, they are tools, nor does shooting in manual mode make you a "hardcore" photographer. All the different modes have their uses, and you're limiting yourself if you only use one.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-07-2009, 08:54 AM
Chewbecca's Avatar
Chewbecca Chewbecca is offline
feel the magic
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 7,328
Default

DSLRs don't have their own built-in light meter. You have to buy them separately.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-07-2009, 11:19 AM
Saje Saje is offline
Island dweller
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 23,932
Default

Yes they do. You can even change the metering modes.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-07-2009, 12:10 PM
Chewbecca's Avatar
Chewbecca Chewbecca is offline
feel the magic
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 7,328
Default

er...what?
Are we talking about spot metering, matrix metering, and center?

I always hear of them referred to as the individual metering type, not as light metering.
I know that SLRs have a light meter, and it's called that: a light meter.

I guess it makes sense, since it's all to due with exposure, but I have been doing so much inside photography (portraiture), that mine mainly stays on spot because spot metering works best when using the SB600 on camera.
And I slap it on matrix when I am snapping shots outside.
In other words, I have never gotten much into metering.

I'M STILL NEW, D@MMIT.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-07-2009, 12:30 PM
Saje Saje is offline
Island dweller
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 23,932
Default

Yeah those are the types but I"m mostly talking about the light meter bar in your viewfinder that gives you an idea of when you are on target or if you are over/under exposing. All cameras have them. If you shoot manual you'll really pay attention to it. although i suspect you already do
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-13-2009, 11:06 PM
Buckshot's Avatar
Buckshot Buckshot is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,155
Default

May want to try a polarizer filter too.
__________________
Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest. ~Denis Diderot

The hardest thing to explain is the glaringly evident which everybody had decided not to see.
Ayn Rand

There is a level of cowardice lower than that of the conformist: the fashionable non-conformist.
Ayn Rand
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-18-2009, 10:45 PM
zoe08's Avatar
zoe08 zoe08 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,160
Default

Saje is right, you definitely want to look at your meter.

First I would start out with definitely at least going to an f/8 aperture. When shooting action I would want a bit more depth of field to make sure the action is in focus.

I always pick my depth of field first, by deciding whether I want shallow (f/4) or I want everything in focus (f/22) and you have all the varying degrees. I then make sure that I can shoot at at LEAST 1/60, preferably faster, especially for action pictures.

You can do all this by looking at the meter Saje is talking about that is inside your viewfinder. Very important tool to shoot in manual.

There are external light meters that is used for flash photography, like if you were setting up a studio, since your camera only measures available light. The external light meter hooks up to your flash, so that you can set your strobes off and it will tell you then what your settings should be.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:58 PM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site