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  #31  
Old 10-18-2008, 12:58 PM
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Domestika Domestika is offline
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Originally Posted by Doberluv View Post
It is not not beneficial to insist on perfect adult behavior from a 4 month old baby. They can learn to sit nicely as Red described. Treats help. Consistency is important. What I'm trying to get across is that trying to train a puppy with rigidity and too much seriousness can cause more harm than good.
There's nothing rigid about trying to be consistent. I know what she's capable of. I don't beat her when she gets it "wrong". I have expectations of her behaviour and I try to be kind and patient while she works it out. She's very smart. She's easily trainable with consistency.

My beef was that people in public are not helping me be consistent. The inconsistency of how people interact with her (despite clear instruction from me) is making it harder for her to learn.
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  #32  
Old 10-18-2008, 01:03 PM
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It's just that when I read the o.p, she sounded quite worried about the fact that her pup was still jumping up on people and that they weren't helping matters.
Ok, I have no idea how I gave that impression. I should re-read my post... I am not worried about her jumping up! She's a puppy! She's going to jump!

However, I would eventually like her to stop. And this will happen a lot sooner if people are more consistent with her. Which means that people need to listen to me when I tell them not to pet her when she's jumping.

That's it. That's the whole issue. I'm not "worried" or frustrated or any of that. I need to re-read what I posted...
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  #33  
Old 10-18-2008, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by corgipower View Post
...I also wanted to point out that she doesn't need to let the non-helpful public pet her dog and she can just let the helpful people pet her dog.
Yeah, we do walk away from people who are just too daft to get it. Ideally, I would want my dog to be able to socialize with everyone who comes up to interact with her, but if I see someone's just intent on teaching her bad habits (ie. encourages her to be mouthy by putting their hands all over her face, or starting to get physical or wrestling with her) then I walk away. Like "Ok, say bye Nova. Gotta keep going..." and we just walk.

It takes a minute to figure out who is and who isn't going to be helpful and I don't have a problem walking away when they aren't. I just wish more people were!

It's like people don't "get" training, I swear. So many people will be like "Oh, she has to perform amazing feats (sitting) in order for me to pet her....nevermind..." Geez, people. Just wait the minute and a half she acts like a nutcase and then you can pet her all you want!
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  #34  
Old 10-18-2008, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Doberluv View Post
But as they learned their lessons in walking nicely on the leash and "let's go"....all that fell into place.
Yeah, "Let's go" is something we've done from the start. It's the only time I'll actually pull her a bit on the leash. "Let's go" is non-negotiable. I'm going and she's coming with me, period. I think that'll come in handy down the road when her brains are working more and she's less excited about each and every single person who comes near us.

I have a dog who ignores people/dogs/whatever on "Leave it". As in "whatever you're getting interested in, leave it alone", which is pretty handy. Not really sure how to teach that though...he kinda just picked it up on his own. I guess just say it the moment they shift their interest in something, to start.
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  #35  
Old 10-18-2008, 04:27 PM
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LOL Domestika .... people are just way harder to train than dogs.
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Originally Posted by Doberluv View Post
But instead of putting the brakes on them, I found it more effective to get them interested in what I was trying to achieve, explain it a little bit and enlist their help. They seemed so much more willing to sort of join in and "follow directions" that way. I found that more people than I thought would be, were actually interested in a little explanation and feeling like they were needed to help.
^^^ Yes, exactly!! People like to feel needed and generally respond very well to sincere requests for help. As a female I have always found this to be especially true of men ... they never seem to refuse requests for help.

For the few people who don't respond well to requests for help, oh well .. Nova can learn from them that's there's all kinds of humans and some are jerks.
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  #36  
Old 10-18-2008, 07:40 PM
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Yes, this is how the process would go for me: First, someone would ooh and ahhh and want to come closer to see my pup. I'd get a very down-trodden look on my face and slump one shoulder in near despair. I'd say with the tone of almost giving up, *sigh*....I am trying to get this pup to stop jumping up (or stop chewing on people, whatever the case would be). (making sure I had their eye contact) Could you help me for a moment? I'd wait, standing back until they answered. They would more times than not, stop in their tracks because I had this real look of exasperation and hopelessness on my face. Now, how couldn't they pity me? And many people were really into it. So, they'd say, "sure...what sould I do?" I'd explain. "If you would only look at or pat my pup when he is on all fours (or sitting) and if he puts his feet on you, stand up and turn away from him without paying any attention. And then when I say, turn back around and try again. Squat down to his level so he doesn't feel like he has to jump so much." And they'd do it...sometimes with a mistake but it still helped a little bit and gave my pup a chance to interact with another human.

I know it's difficult. I have the same problem with people and my Chihuahuas and their licking. For me, they'll stop when I say, "enough." But other people say, "Oh, it's okay. I don't mind." I would say that each time the dog licks after being told "enough," he/she should be set down on the floor and ignored....every single time and immediately. But other people tell the dog, "no" but keep on paying attention and loving them. I don't bother making an issue out of it. It's not worth it to me because the licking doesn't bother me so much as they will stop for me when I say "enough" so if these people really don't mind, oh well....it's not the worst behavior in the world. And in fact, it's really the only behavior "problem" they even have beside yapping. They stop that too on the cue, "enough." Oh, and begging and getting in the way and getting on my chair and taking dirty clothes out of the hamper and stealing socks. And yesterday, chasing after a herd of escaped cows that were running through my pasture....about 10 of them! But that's all.
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  #37  
Old 10-18-2008, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baxter'smybaby View Post
can you put a vest or back pack on her with "dog in training" printed on it? Sometimes people will have more respect for something like this than the actual words of the owner. Just a thought.
^^^ I've found this works very well. I bought an Outward Hound pack and put it on Morgan when I took him to band camp in August. I wasn't even intending it to be a training thing... I just wanted him to carry all of his own stuff so I didn't have to.

However, it proved to work out great, because for the first time ever, people actually ASKED me if they could pet him, and I could answer with yes or no depending on Morgan's behavior at the time. If he was waiting patiently the way he was supposed to, then "yes". If he was being a pain in the you-know-what, I could say "no, sorry, he's in training and needs to calm down first" and people were okay with that.

I also had to leave him on a tie out and go work with kids a few times now and again (never too far away, I could still see/monitor him) and if he was wearing the pack, people would leave him alone. If the pack was off, people were more likely to wander past and visit with him.



I hope I'm not being overly repetitive. I saw Bax's answer and skimmed the rest of the thread to get here.
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  #38  
Old 10-18-2008, 10:36 PM
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We definitely had this problem with Strider, and no amount of explaining the he was going to be a HUGE dog and that no, it's not okay if he jumps on you ever got through to them.

In the end, I decided to just let him go for it because him being socialized and loved up by strangers at that age was way more important than manners. Then...magically, when he was about 4 months old, he was suddenly way too big for jumping up to be cute anymore. Imagine that!

So, once he reached his magical "too big for jumping up" size, people stopped encouraging it and it only took about a week to break him of the habit because he already knew he wasn't allowed to do it to us, and being taller he didn't really need to jump up to get attention. This probably won't work with every dog, but it worked out that way for us.
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  #39  
Old 10-19-2008, 07:42 AM
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Fortunately with my Doberman, Lyric, he wasn't apt to jump up on people just by his nature. He was more reserved right from the start. And he almost naturally, without much prompting from me would plop into a sit....as though he were more comfortable that way for visiting. He jumped on me a little bit at first, but got over that really quickly. But other pups I've had....and the Chi's were a little more that way and still are apt to put their little feet up sometimes...but not anything too much.

Quote:
So, once he reached his magical "too big for jumping up" size, people stopped encouraging it and it only took about a week to break him of the habit because he already knew he wasn't allowed to do it to us, and being taller he didn't really need to jump up to get attention.
That makes sense. It sounds like it worked out. They do eventually become civilized, don't they.
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  #40  
Old 10-19-2008, 09:02 AM
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Just try to quickly explain to the approaching person that you are working on her training and ASK them if they would be willing to help you real quick and explain you want your dog to sit before she pets the dog.

People sometimes just don't understand, but I've found that if I offer the above brief explanation, people are jumping in line to "help."
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