Dog Site - Dog Stuff
Dog Forum | Dog Pictures

Go Back   Chazhound Dog Forum > Dog Discussions and Dog Talk Forums > Dog Training Forum


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-06-2008, 04:01 PM
TheCasa TheCasa is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 35
Default Dog Intense!

So Guinness is 11 months old now, has passed beginner obedience class and is doing quite well in Novice 1. We've been talking about looking for another training center or trainer because we're not into ring training. We actually would like to share him as a therapy dog.

He does VERY well in public. We take him to shopping malls, indoor and out, into very nice stores with very breakable things, lots of people, kids, strollers, wheelchairs, and just about anything else you can imagine. He reacts as perfectly as I would like him to. He shows neither fear nor excessive interest in anything. Of course people love him and want to pet him and he welcomes their affection. He doesn't jump on them, lick, paw, or anything that he shouldn't do. He's a model citizen in most every way when we're out and about.

That brings me to the "problem." He's a VERY dog social. If he sees a dog, he focuses like a laser beam while we get closer together. He's always done this, so I've trained him to sit or down as other dogs approach because most other owners get scared when they see this giant black dog staring at their little *insert name of tiny dog breed here*. Once he's within "sniffing distance," he jumps....lunges at the other dog attempting to sniff. This is such rude behavior in both dog and human language. He doesn't have an aggressive bone in his body and he's very careful, especially around small dogs. He's never jumped ON a dog unless it was a big dog and they were playing; he just wants to sniff. The problem is in the greeting. I can't seem to get him to stay calm and greet slowly.

Am I doing the right thing by keeping him in a down while the other dogs approach? I've been thinking of eliciting the help of some neighbors or people at the training club or friends to bring their dogs over or meet them someplace so that I can work on this with him. I thought that it would be a good idea to get him in a down when he sees the other dog and have them approach. If he gets up or jumps, have them turn around and walk the other way. I would do the same with him and we'd try again.

How have some of you dealt with dogs that are so intense around other dogs? I suppose I should be happy that he's neither fearful or aggressive around other animals, but he causes other animals (and their humans) to fear him when he has no intention to cause them harm, nor has he ever hurt another animal. Nevertheless, when my family and just about every other person I know with a dog is afraid that he's going to "eat" their dog, it's very disheartening and sand... Guinness has even been banned from my parent's house because their dogs are afraid of him. I'm sure that if he was a little more calm and a little less curious, they might get over it and he could come with us on our weekly visits.

Thanks in advance.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-06-2008, 04:08 PM
RedyreRottweilers
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The FIRST thing I would do is interrupt the dog the SECOND he tries to lock eyes with the other dog.

I would do most anything to keep him busy and/or distracted. Walk. Talk. Feed. Play.

Strong rewards for paying attention to you. Lots of movement, turning, and distractions if he tries NOT to focus on you but the other dog.

IMO it is the wrong thing to just let him lock stares with an approaching dog.

My guess also is that your dog is still a PUPPY, as he gets older, it will become clear that this is not play behavior.

Also, and I must emphasize this: I have owned a breed for 20+ years that is not known for playing well with others. I DO NOT allow my personal dogs to socialize or interact with dogs who are not in their pack. I will allow the occasional sniff and play bow, but I always control my dogs, and they learn very early that too much attention to other dogs gets them a lot of work to do.

JMO as always....
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-07-2008, 01:49 PM
TheCasa TheCasa is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 35
Default

I'm not sure it's locking eyes, but i'll be sure to get a better observation tonight when we go to training. I think he just looks at them out of curiosity. He seems to get the idea when an unfriendly dog makes it clear that he doesnt' want to be messed with. I'll be more observant tonight and see if I can figure out what's going on.

The other problem is have is that he is more play motivated than food motivated and playing with the other dog is by far the most rewarding activity he could have.

Given this, is it a good idea to just walk away if he focuses intently on the other dog and make the reward for behaving properly moving towards a dog that we know is friendly? We have lots of opportunity for him to meet friendly, well adjusted dogs through the training club. It may be worth it to go there every day for a few weeks.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-07-2008, 06:07 PM
lizzybeth727's Avatar
lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 6,403
Default

I agree with Redyre, I never let my dog play with another dog in public, just a little sniffing, and not always even that.

Question: Do your shopping malls allow dogs??
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-07-2008, 10:28 PM
TheCasa TheCasa is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 35
Default

some do. There's an upscale outdoor shopping center in the yuppie part of town that allows dogs in all the stores except the grocery store.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-08-2008, 05:50 PM
lizzybeth727's Avatar
lizzybeth727 lizzybeth727 is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 6,403
Default

Wow, that's really nice.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-09-2008, 09:47 AM
TheCasa TheCasa is offline
Puppy Dog
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 35
Default

yeah, it's very nice. There's stores like Williams-sonoma, pottery barn, restoration hardware, really upscale restaurants, decor specialty shops, etc. The dogs are welcomed into all the businesses except the restaurants and grocery store. This center is also very close to the dog park, so some weekends, we make a 2-fer stop and go shopping before the park.

Like I said - we go into all the stores where there are lots of breakable items at nose and tail level (He's a great dane, so there's not much he can't reach) and he stays perfectly calm, walks right with me and unless people are overly-excited themselves to see him, he greets very slowly and calmly. He's amazing with kids. We went to a plant and herb festival last weekend and he had kids all over him. We were even standing there talking to a friend when a small kid (3 or 4, probably) ran up to him from the side and grabbed him around the neck for a hug. Neither my wife, Guinness nor I saw him coming, but G-man was a perfect gentleman. He stood there calmly and accepted the lovin. There were plenty of other dogs there and he showed his interest from a distance and walked calmly to them, but once he was within distance, he lunged towards them to sniff. It's so embarrassing for us and scary for other owners. We try to warn from outside the distance that he's very gently, but very friendly and tell them what's likely to ensue. Some owners with well socialized dogs oblige and some are even patient enough to let us work with him about a proper approach for a few minutes, but most pick up their dogs and walk away terrified that the big lug will hurt their precious babies, with no evidence that he will other than their own prejudices....despite our assurances that he's perfectly safe and gentle. I understand their fear, but it's frustrating and sad for us since we know that he's just excited.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-09-2008, 10:55 AM
release the hounds release the hounds is offline
Top Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,154
Default

I think putting him in a down and allowing him to watch the other dog get closer and closer and closer, is just loading him really.

I wouldn't allow interaction much, especially if you have hopes of being a therapy dog. he has to learn that other dogs are just other things, not play mates to seek out.

Being able to interact with other dogs is important though as well, so play dates with dogs you know are important as well, but out in public doing other things, I'd make as much room between us and another dog as it took to get the attention back on me.

BTW, i'm jealous of the mall that allows dogs. I used to be able to do stuff in a lot of stores around here, I always asked, and never had a problem. In fact employees, managers, etc still ask me about some of my dogs i've brought in there that they got to know. But it appears some have abused the priviledge and now most places that used to, don't allow dogs anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-13-2008, 03:52 AM
goosey's Avatar
goosey goosey is offline
Big Dog
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: QLD Australia
Posts: 163
Default

Maybe you are making a to bigger deal of it by making him sit or giving him a command.
For some dogs having to think about something ealse instead of the situation at hand helps, but maybe not for your dog.
Try treating it like any other situation just ignore him and the other dog and casually move away. When you make a big deal he will think it's a big deal. Even if it's just one word like sit or drop, to him that may signal "look a dog get ready to greet him in excitment".

Also like others said his age is a large factor.
__________________

Mac Attack
Rip Daisy
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:29 AM.


1997-2013 Chazhound Dog Site