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  #1  
Old 05-07-2009, 10:05 PM
ocean2026 ocean2026 is offline
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Default Will a puppy love you more than an adult dog?

Is the advantage of getting a puppy because it bonds more closely to its owner and is a more loving pet than perhaps a 1-2 yr old dog?


or

is the advantage more in being able to watch the dog grow and to be able to train it the way the owner wants?
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:44 PM
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You can do all of that with an adult dog (er.. except the growing part).

My puppy had zero interest in me. We didn't start to bond until he was nearly 1 year old already.
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:58 PM
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All of my dogs have been over a year old when I've gotten them and I don't think my Aussie could be anymore bonded to me.

I think the main advantage in a puppy is knowing the background. I've had to guess on the first year and some with my dogs and work from there, but you typically have a decent idea of where a pup came from. Doesn't mean there won't be surprises though.
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Old 05-08-2009, 12:02 AM
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The age you get a dog has nothing to do with bonding, IMO. I know people who have had their dog since eight weeks and never have the bond that some folks with a rescue adopted at the age of seven have with their dog.

It depends on many factors. I don't think you can predict the level of bond you'll have with a dog. Just give it the best you can, spend lots of time with them and it just... happens!
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Old 05-08-2009, 05:48 AM
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To me the only benefit of a puppy (if we are talking about shelter dogs) is that you can make sure he gets all his socialization. BUT if you get an adult you can tell what the affects of his socialization are, so if he is not noise shy, human or dog aggressive you can be confident that no matter what socialization he got he's pretty well off.
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Old 05-08-2009, 06:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocean2026 View Post
is the advantage more in being able to watch the dog grow and to be able to train it the way the owner wants?
For me it's the training aspect. But it's really only an issue because I train for various competition venues and I want the imprinting. I could get an adult that had been started with training, that had the right imprinting and socializing, but I'd pay much more money for it.

For most people, they do fine getting an adult. The benefit of getting an adult is that you have a better idea of the dog's temperament, personality, size (especially if it's a mix), etc.
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Old 05-15-2009, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corgipower View Post
For me it's the training aspect. But it's really only an issue because I train for various competition venues.
I train service dogs, and my organization gets all of our dogs from shelters/rescues. The temperment evaluations for puppies are not accurate enough for what we do, so we only adopt adult dogs -- 1-3 years old.

It is very hard to compare organizations, since the training program and standards are different everywhere, but IMO we spend just as much time training the dogs as an organization that starts with puppies. Sometimes, too, because we don't know exact ages of the dogs, we get younger dogs - 8-12 months - and we ALWAYS spend more time training these dogs, because they lack the maturity to do the job as well as an older dog. Most of a service dog's job is to lay and chill out, which younger dogs have a hard time with! So we find that older dogs are much easier to train overall.

If you compare release rates - the number of dogs that are brought into the program only to be determined to not have the temperment for a service dog - our rate is also much lower than the rest of the industry. We release about 40% of the dogs we bring in. Organizations that breed their own dogs will release about 70-80% of the litter - and they are breeding ONLY for temperment, and do extensive socialization and early training with their puppies.

So, again, it's very hard to compare, but IMO there is no benefit to getting a puppy versus an adult, or vice-versa. Personally, I'd ALWAYS prefer an adult, puppies drive me crazy!
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Old 05-08-2009, 07:45 AM
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In some cases rescuing a dog can help a bond be stronger. The dog knows that there are other options than a loving family.

This dog (Sport) was rescued. We got him at a year. He had belonged to a family who really didn't like him. (he was left in a crate while the family went away for a weekend vacation with no one to come let him out)

Look at him now. He LIVES for my son.










There is no way that dog could love the child any more. We had a pup we got from a breeder. My son tried to work with her. He went to lessons with her. He loved her.. but they just didn't bond.

It has nothing to do with when you get your dog. It has more to do with how well your dog fits into your family. And in many cases its easier to know how well a dog will fit if he's a bit older.
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Old 05-16-2009, 10:29 PM
aussiemyf7 aussiemyf7 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dekka View Post
In some cases rescuing a dog can help a bond be stronger. The dog knows that there are other options than a loving family.

This dog (Sport) was rescued. We got him at a year. He had belonged to a family who really didn't like him. (he was left in a crate while the family went away for a weekend vacation with no one to come let him out)

Look at him now. He LIVES for my son.










There is no way that dog could love the child any more. We had a pup we got from a breeder. My son tried to work with her. He went to lessons with her. He loved her.. but they just didn't bond.

It has nothing to do with when you get your dog. It has more to do with how well your dog fits into your family. And in many cases its easier to know how well a dog will fit if he's a bit older.
Dekka thats so beautiful.
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Old 05-08-2009, 08:04 AM
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Dekka...those pictures made me all misty eyed! What a beautiful pair!!
Thank you for sharing those.
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