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Old 10-30-2012, 03:35 PM
Hespa
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Default English Shepherds

I have been doing some research on this breed. The one question that we have not found an answer to is - is this breed apt to chase cars, trucks, etc. because of their herding traits? Years ago we had Shelties and that was one thing they just thought they needed to do. If an English Shepherd is taught that is not allowed as a puppy, will they not give in to temptation later on?

Last edited by Hespa; 10-30-2012 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 10-30-2012, 03:51 PM
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How about don't have your dog loose around cars no matter what breed it is. I mean, its a dog not a person and they should not be expected to know not to chase cars...
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Old 10-30-2012, 03:58 PM
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We are on a farm. The dog needs to be able to stroll around the farm to keep an eye on anything that is not the way it should be or persons entering barns to steal tools, gas, etc. We have two sets of buildings on 150 acres and unfortunately a road disections our farm.
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Old 11-03-2012, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hespa View Post
We are on a farm. The dog needs to be able to stroll around the farm to keep an eye on anything that is not the way it should be or persons entering barns to steal tools, gas, etc. We have two sets of buildings on 150 acres and unfortunately a road disections our farm.
Even if the puppy didn't chase cars.. I'd be worried that you expect your dog to stroll I assume both sides of that road. Even if it doesn't chase cars, it may still be hit by one. Sounds like you could use an alarm system, not an animal.
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Old 11-05-2012, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Aleron View Post
I would say it is because they "think cars are sheep" but herding breed dogs are wired to be motion sensitive and interested in controlling movement so it isn't all that far fetched to think some would develop car chasing issues if given the opportunity.
Being turned on and responding to movement is a prey drive thing and far from exclusive to herding.

Herding is simply a matter of channeled prey drive when used to control specific other species.
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Old 10-30-2012, 04:10 PM
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My in-laws' ES was a car chaser. You can imagine why she's no longer with us.
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Old 10-30-2012, 06:53 PM
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I really think it depends on the dog, honestly. In my experience, the dogs that chase cars view the cars as "trespassers" and are bored. I imagine if the pup is used to cars constantly coming and going and has plenty to do (and perhaps trained very strongly to avoid cars/the road) it would be okay. Never 100% though. Even if the dog isn't chasing cars, but happens to be in the road at the wrong time...dead dog.

Our dogs chased cars they viewed as a territorial threat. They would chase them to the edge of our property and then stop and come back. I think, IMO, if you are wanting to avoid a car chasing dog it is going to have a lot more to do with training and a lot less to do with breed.
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by *blackrose View Post
I really think it depends on the dog, honestly. In my experience, the dogs that chase cars view the cars as "trespassers" and are bored.
This exactly. My dogs are not car chasers per say. They won't chase cars when I'm with them, or they are on lead, or working out in the yards, but when left out in our fenced dog yard, they will run up and down the fence and bark at cars. They are bored and it's something to do.

If you're looking for a breed of dog to watch over your farm and be a guard dog I'd look into a different breed. LGD's were meant to do exactly as described, patrol the farm, guard livestock, etc. I'm pretty sure an English Shepherd is more of an all purpose farm dog, and would require a bit more family time and individual training to keep it occupied.
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:57 PM
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LGD's were meant to do exactly as described, patrol the farm, guard livestock, etc. I'm pretty sure an English Shepherd is more of an all purpose farm dog, and would require a bit more family time and individual training to keep it occupied.
I had an LGD chase my car as I was leaving my parent's house last weekend. What if it'd been some douche hunter from the valley or something that like to speed through that area?

Riding with my friend's hubby to go see her, we almost hit a different LGD in a different ranch area that was chasing cars on the highway. Apparently the cars on the highway were more engaging than his flock of sheep. I notice they no longer have an LGD with the flock....

Any breed of dog can chase cars.
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Old 10-30-2012, 07:03 PM
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I am going to very carefully say that they are less prone to movement reactivity than some BCs and some ACDs. However I strongly agree that it's less about breed tendency and more about the individual and training. I would hope you would be very careful with your puppy and not expect it to know better without good training and management.
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