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Old 09-20-2009, 09:35 AM
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Wimble Woof Wimble Woof is offline
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Default Brucellosis

Hey everyone,
Well, my last time here was when Karma was going in for hip/elbow evaluations and I'm happy to report that she has no signs of displaysia at all. Now that she has had all of her breed specific genetic tests and has passed each and every one with flying colors the decision to breed is where we are standing.
She came into heat a few days ago so clearly it's time to run back and forth to the vets for every other test imaginable, cycles of progesterone tests in the event natural breeding doesn't occur and AI is needed, as well as Brucellosis.

I will be honest, I was unaware of Brucellosis ( which is another great reason people should be working with a mentor when breeding) however, Karmas results came back negative, I got curious about it. Seeing as though thats the kind of person I am, if I don't know about something I make it a point to learn as much about it as possible. Therefore this is why I am here making this thread.
I have done a great deal of reading on Brucellosis but even when I did a search here about it, it really turned up with nothing more than the mention that it is a necessary test to be done. I would like to get some good information or links together for future reference on it.

Also, after I started reading on Brucellosis, i am curious if there is any risk of it to altered dogs, I realize it is mostly contracted by mating but I have read some info that it can be transmitted by licking. So, considering I have taken in rescues over the years and fostered I got to thinking for those of us who do this, shouldn't rescues also be tested? Most information I have read on it the only concern is to breeding dogs, and the possibility of euthanasia if one is found to have it. This concerns me, I can not find any information about it other than it discussing breeding dogs becoming sterile.

I called my vet and they are putting together a print up for me about it ( they have gotten to know my research nature over the years and don't even question why I want to know about things in the depth I do when I call them now, but it takes them a few days to get this sort of stuff together for me understandably) I have actually called a few vets, one of which a livestock/small animal vet in the area to whom I actually was asked "what is it that the brucellosis test tests for again?" I didn't expect too much information from them about it.

So any help would be appreciated. Google searches have brought up a great deal of conflicting information and opinions about it I find.

TIA
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Old 09-20-2009, 10:12 AM
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I always insisted on testing before breeding .
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Old 09-20-2009, 10:15 AM
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As will I but I am finding no one really knows why they insist on it other than to prevent sterility ( if thats a word or not)
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Old 09-20-2009, 01:09 PM
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It's not that common, but can cause sterility, abortion, etc. if they were to become infected.

Here's some info:

Quote:
Although dogs occasionally become infected with Brucella abortus , B suis , or B melitensis , these sporadic occurrences are usually closely associated with infected domestic livestock (see also Brucellosis in Large Animals: Introduction).
B canis is a cause of abortion in kenneled dogs. Dogs are the definitive host of this organism, and natural infections in other animals are rare. Infection has caused a reduction of 75% in the number of pups weaned in some breeding kennels. The disease disseminates rapidly among closely confined dogs, especially at time of breeding or when abortions occur. Transmission occurs via ingestion of contaminated materials or venereal routes. Both sexes appear to be equally susceptible. Transmission of brucellosis from dogs to humans occurs but appears to be very rare.
Primary signs are abortion during the last trimester of pregnancy without premonitory signs, stillbirths, and conception failures. Prolonged vaginal discharge usually follows abortion. Abortions may occur during subsequent pregnancies. Infected dogs may develop generalized lymphadenitis and frequently epididymitis, periorchitis, and prostatitis. Spondylitis and uveitis are occasional complications. Bacteremia is frequent and persists for ~18 mo after exposure. Fever is not characteristic.
Diagnosis is based on isolation and identification of the causative agent or by serology. The organisms can usually be readily isolated from vaginal exudate, aborted pups, blood, milk, or semen of infected dogs. The most widely used serologic test is an agglutination test by a tube or slide method. Nonspecific agglutination reactions occur in some dogs from which Brucella has not been isolated. To eliminate nonspecific antibodies, the serum is treated with 2-mercaptoethanol and retested. An agar gel immunodiffusion test performed in some laboratories is quite specific.
Attempts at immunization have not been successful. Control is based on elimination or isolation of infected dogs identified by positive cultural or serologic tests. Incidence of infection is much lower in kennels where dogs are caged individually. Longterm therapy, eg, with a combination of streptomycin or gentamicin and tetracycline, has been successful in many cases. Neutering of infected dogs is sometimes an alternative to euthanasia.
Merck Veterinary Manual

And quotes from the Merck manual with links to the full article:

[paraphrased] Brucellosis can cause orchitis and epididymitis in a stud, causing sterility in most cases. Merck Veterinary Manual

[direct quote]" ... The only confirmed infectious cause of infertility in the bitch is brucellosis ..." Merck Veterinary Manual
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:39 PM
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the funny thing is you see brucellosis neg or the requirement for it all over the adds (especially stud adds) in the hunting dog mags like full cry, coonhound bloodlines, & hunter's horn among others.
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Old 09-22-2009, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops2 View Post
the funny thing is you see brucellosis neg or the requirement for it all over the adds (especially stud adds) in the hunting dog mags like full cry, coonhound bloodlines, & hunter's horn among others.
It's been around sooo long that old timers and newcomers alike will test for it just on the odd chance of it springing up and ruining everything!!
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Old 09-22-2009, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops2 View Post
the funny thing is you see brucellosis neg or the requirement for it all over the adds (especially stud adds) in the hunting dog mags like full cry, coonhound bloodlines, & hunter's horn among others.
It can be contracted by an animal eating the afterbirth of another infected animal, right? Maybe the dogs of hunting/hound breeders are more likely to be around affected livestock. IIRC cattle, pigs, elk, and buffalo can all get it. (Okay, elk and buffalo aren't usually livestock, but you know what I mean.)
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Old 09-22-2009, 08:40 PM
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but i never see it mentioned on the show dog breeder sites or in dog world (well maybe not never but rare enough i can't remember seeing it).
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Old 09-22-2009, 08:48 PM
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I see it mentioned if people openly stud out to approved bitches on their websites... That their own males are tested often and negative.. and there needs to be a recent test for the bitch in the approval process.
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Old 09-22-2009, 09:55 PM
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true but most houndsmen don't allow dogs to just run free around the farm and usually don't hunt in pastures or hog barns.
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